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Best American football head coach of All Time

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    1
    Frank Dobson

    Frank Dobson

    • Current team head coached:
    Frank Mills Dobson (January 10, 1885 – 1959) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Georgia (1909, with James Coulter), Clemson University (1910–1912), the University of Richmond (1913–1917, 1919–1933), the University of South Carolina (1918), the University of Maryland (1936–1939), and The Apprentice School (1940–1948), compiling a career record of 137–142–24. Dobson was also the head basketball coach at Clemson (1911–1913) and Richmond (1912–1917, 1919–1933) and the head baseball coach at Clemson (1911–1913) and Richmond (1915–1933). A native of Roanoke, Virginia, Dobson was an assistant under legendary Georgia Tech head coach John Heisman. In 1909, Dobson moved to Georgia Tech's arch-rival, Georgia. There, the new head coach, James Coulter, had no prior coaching experience. Dobson was hired as a co-coach and added new trick plays in an attempt to energize the offense. Still the team finished with a record of 2–4–2. Dobson moved on to Clemson University for the 1910 season, where he coached not only football, but also basketball and baseball. His overall record with the Clemson football team was
    6.64
    11 votes
    2
    Herman Edwards

    Herman Edwards

    • Current team head coached:
    Herman "Herm" Edwards, Jr. (born April 27, 1954) is an American football analyst who most recently coached in the National Football League for the Kansas City Chiefs. He was fired from this position on January 23, 2009. Since then, he has been hired as a football analyst for ESPN. He played the position of cornerback for ten seasons (1977–1986) with the Philadelphia Eagles, Los Angeles Rams and Atlanta Falcons. Prior to his coaching career, Edwards was known best as the player who recovered a fumble by Giants quarterback Joe Pisarcik on a play that has been dubbed by some as "The Miracle at the Meadowlands." Before being hired as the tenth head coach in Kansas City Chiefs history, Edwards was the head coach of the New York Jets from 2001–2005. He is known for his gameday terminology, dubbed "Hermisms" by fans. Of these, the quote and sound bite, "You play to win the game!", a message that Edwards gave during a New York Jets press conference, became the title of his book, a collection of "leadership lessons" for the reader to use as personal motivation. Edwards was born on an Army base in Eatontown, New Jersey. The son of an African American World War II veteran and his German wife,
    7.11
    9 votes
    3
    George Halas

    George Halas

    • Current team head coached:
    George Stanley Halas, Sr. (February 2, 1895 – October 31, 1983), nicknamed "Papa Bear" and "Mr. Everything", was a player, coach, owner and pioneer in professional American football. He was the iconic longtime leader of the NFL's Chicago Bears. He was also lesser known as an inventor, jurist, producer, philanthropist, philatelist, and professional baseball player. Halas was born in Chicago, Illinois, into a family of Czech-Bohemian immigrants. His parents were Slavic migrants from Pilsen, Bohemia part of what would later become Czechoslovakia. George had a varied career in sports. In 1915, Halas worked temporarily for Western Electric and was planning on being on the Eastland. He was running late, however, and missed the capsizing. After graduating from Crane High School in Chicago, he attended the University of Illinois, playing football for coach Bob Zuppke as well as baseball and basketball, and earning a degree in civil engineering. He also became a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He helped Illinois win the 1918 Big Ten football title. Serving as an ensign in the Navy during World War I, he played for a team at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, and was named the
    8.00
    7 votes
    4
    W. H. Hargiss

    W. H. Hargiss

    • Current team head coached:
    Homer Woodson "Bill" Hargiss (September 1, 1887 – October 15, 1978) was an American football and basketball player, and track and field athlete, and coach in Kansas and Oregon. He was an early innovator in football and was known to be one of the first coaches to use the forward pass and the huddle. Hargiss participated in sports at Kansas Normal College, now Emporia State University. He was a standout at the college in football, baseball, basketball, gymnastics, boxing, and track & field. Emporia State honored him in 1982 by inducting him into their "Athletic Hall of Honor" -- the first year the honor was available, as a distinguished alumni in 1970, and for the all-Centennial Team in 1997. Hargiss would later return to the college as a coach. Hargiss's first coaching job came as the head coach of the College of Emporia (C of E) in Emporia, Kansas. The school had a well-developed rivalry with Kansas State Normal School, where Hargiss played quarterback the previous year, and would later coach. At C of E, Hargiss developed plays using talented quarterback Arthur Schabinger that most had never seen before, namely the forward pass and the option pass. In the team's 1910 game at
    7.86
    7 votes
    5
    Stan Parrish

    Stan Parrish

    • Current team head coached:
    Stan Parrish (born September 20, 1946) is an American football coach and former player. Most recently, he was the head coach at Ball State University from 2009 to 2010. Parrish was previously head coach at Wabash College, Marshall University and Kansas State University. He has been an offensive coordinator at Ball State and the University of Michigan. Parrish is currently the quarterbacks coach at Siena Heights University. Parrish was born on September 20, 1946 in Cleveland, Ohio. He attended Valley Forge High School in Parma Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1964. Parrish then attended Heidelberg College, where he played football as a defensive back from 1965 to 1968. He graduated in 1969 with a bachelor's degree. After graduating from Heidelberg, Parrish began his coaching career at Windham High School in Windham, Ohio in 1969. He coached the Bombers first as an assistant, then as head coach. He led the Bombers to their first ever Ohio high school football playoff berth in his final year, 1974; only four teams in each division qualified in those early years of the playoffs. In 1975, Parrish joined the staff at Purdue University as a graduate assistant. Parrish had a
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    Marty Schottenheimer

    Marty Schottenheimer

    • Current team head coached: Virginia Destroyers
    Martin Edward "Marty" Schottenheimer (/ˈʃɒtənhaɪmər/; born September 23, 1943) is a former professional American football player and coach. Over his career, he has served as head coach of the Cleveland Browns, Kansas City Chiefs, Washington Redskins, and San Diego Chargers. He has the most wins of any NFL coach since 1966 to never coach a team in a Super Bowl (which was first held in that year). He was fired from his head coaching position with the San Diego Chargers in 2007, after leading the Chargers to a 14–2 record but a disappointing second round loss. He later emerged as the head coach of the Virginia Destroyers of the United Football League, where he would win his only championship as a coach in his lone season there. Schottenheimer was born in McDonald, Pennsylvania. Marty attended high school at Fort Cherry High School in McDonald, Pennsylvania. After attending the University of Pittsburgh, Schottenheimer, a linebacker, was selected in the fourth round of the 1965 NFL Draft by the Baltimore Colts and in the seventh round of the 1965 American Football League draft by the Buffalo Bills. He signed with the Bills and spent the next four (1965, 1966, 1967, and 1968) seasons
    8.60
    5 votes
    7
    George Little

    George Little

    • Current team head coached:
    George Edkin Little (May 27, 1889 – February 23, 1957) was an American football player, and coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati (1914–1915), Miami University (1916, 1919–1921), the University of Michigan (1924), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison (1925–1926), compiling a career college football record of 54–16–4. Little was also the head basketball coach at Cincinnati (1914–1916) and Miami (1916–1917, 1919–1922), tallying a career college basketball mark of 47–38. In addition to coaching, he served as the athletic director at Wisconsin and Rutgers University and as the Executive Secretary of the National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame. Little was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1955. Little was born in May 1889 in Washington, D.C. His father, George Little, was a Pennsylvania native and a school teacher. His mother, Marion Little, was also a Pennsylvania native. He had a younger brother, Howard Little (born July 1890), and a younger sister, Elizabeth Little (born February 1897). At the time of the 1900 United States Census, the
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Mike Shanahan

    Mike Shanahan

    • Current team head coached: Washington Redskins
    Michael Edward "Mike" Shanahan (born August 24, 1952) is the 28th and current head coach of the Washington Redskins of the National Football League. Shanahan also holds the title of Vice President of Football Operations with the Redskins, giving him full control over player personnel with the team. Shanahan previously coached the Los Angeles Raiders and the Denver Broncos. He led the Broncos to back-to-back Super Bowl victories in 1997 and 1998. Shanahan played high school football at East Leyden High School, Franklin Park, Illinois, where he played wishbone quarterback for legendary Eagles coach Jack Leese's 1968 and 1969 teams. He held the single-game rushing record of 260 yards on 15 carries (which was set in a 32–8 win over Hinsdale South on September 20, 1969) until it was broken in 1976 by Dennis Cascio. He graduated from high school in June 1970. He was a quarterback at Eastern Illinois University, where he joined Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity. During a practice in the 1970s, a hard hit on the practice field ruptured one of his kidneys, which caused his heart to stop for thirty seconds and nearly killed him. A priest was summoned to read the last rites to Shanahan, a devout
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Sam McElroy

    Sam McElroy

    • Current team head coached:
    Sam McElroy (born c. 1963 in Corsicana, Texas) is an American football coach. He formerly served as the defensive line coach for the Texas Tech Red Raiders and as head coach at Tarleton State University. McElroy is a 1985 graduate of Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University–San Marcos), where he did not play varsity football but served as student assistant to head coach John O'Hara. Soon after graduation he became assistant coach at Corsicana High School. In 1989, he was hired by Grant Teaff to serve as graduate assistant at Baylor University. He later had short stints at Navarro College and at Alto High School, where he was named 1992 District 22-AA Coach of the Year after winning the district title and earning a state playoff berth. In 1993, McElroy was hired by Ron Randleman to serve as defensive backs coach at Sam Houston State University. During his seven years on the staff at Sam Houston State, McElroy coached eight players who earned All-Southland Conference honors. In 2000, he left SHSU to join Todd Whitten's coaching staff at Tarleton State as defensive coordinator. While at Tarleton, McElroy guided a defense that improved each year under his direction.
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Grenville Lewis

    Grenville Lewis

    • Current team head coached:
    Grenville Lewis, Jr. (November 12, 1875 – September 1964) was an American engineer, cattle rancher, and college football coach. He served as the head coach at the Maryland Agricultural College (now University of Maryland). Lewis was born on November 12, 1875 in Washington, D.C., where he received a public education, including at the Business High School. He attended the Maryland Agricultural College, where he played as a fullback on the football team in 1894 and served as team captain in 1896. In his two seasons as a Maryland player, Lewis played every minute of each game. The school briefly discontinued its football team in 1895, but resurrected it the following year. As team captain in 1896, Lewis instituted the program's first physical training regimen, which included calisthenics and long-distance running. As coach in 1896, Lewis compiled an 6–2–2 record. Lewis also played on the baseball team and served as its captain in 1897. He graduated in 1897 with a Bachelor of Science degree from the school's Scientific Course. In 1897, Lewis intended to commute to College Park from Washington, D.C. to assist Maryland captain and player-coach John Lillibridge with his coaching duties.
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    John McLean

    John McLean

    • Current team head coached:
    John Frederick McLean (January 10, 1878 – June 4, 1955) was an All-American college football player, track and field athlete, and coach. He won a silver medal in the 110 metre hurdles at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris with a time of 15.5 seconds. He was also selected as an All-American football player in 1899 while playing for the University of Michigan. He went on to coach the Knox College and University of Missouri football teams in the 1900s. He was dismissed from his coaching position at Missouri in January 1906 after being accused of paying money to a player. McLean's hometown was Menominee, Michigan, a lumber town located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. He enrolled in the University of Michigan where he became a star athlete in American football, track and field, and baseball. He played as a substitute on Michigan's 1897 football team and played left halfback for the 1898 and 1899 teams. McLean was also a member of Michigan's track and baseball teams. In May 1899, McLean set the University of Michigan school record in the 120-yard hurdles with a time of 16-1/5 seconds. On the same day, he also broke a western intercollegiate record in the running broad jump by clearing 23
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    John Pont

    John Pont

    • Current team head coached:
    John Pont (November 13, 1927 – July 1, 2008) was an American football player and coach. He served as head coach at Miami University, Yale University, Northwestern University and Indiana University. He was the only Indiana University coach to take a team to the Rose Bowl. Later in his career, Pont was recruited to start a football program at Cincinnati's College of Mount St. Joseph. He later served as coach and consultant in creating a semi-professional football league in Japan. He was honored as NCAA Division I-A coach of the year in 1967, the year his Hoosiers appeared in the Rose Bowl. He was a member of the Cradle of Coaches and the Miami and Indiana Athletic Halls of Fame as well as Mid-American Conference Hall of Fame and the Indiana Football Hall of Fame. Pont was born on November 13, 1927 in Canton, Ohio to Bautista and Suzannah Pont. He graduated from Timken High School in Canton. As an undergraduate at Miami University, Pont was an outstanding halfback, playing for coaches Woody Hayes and Ara Parseghian, and was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. After a serving a tour as a Navy submariner, Pont played professional football in Canada. He and several of his "Cradle of
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    Urban Meyer

    Urban Meyer

    • Current team head coached: Ohio State Buckeyes football
    Urban Frank Meyer, III (born July 10, 1964) is an American football coach and former player. He is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University, having been hired for the position in November 2011. Meyer has previously served as the head football coach at Bowling Green State University from 2001 to 2002, at the University of Utah from 2003 to 2004, and at the University of Florida from 2005 until his retirement at the end of the 2010 season. He coached the Florida Gators to two BCS National Championship Game victories, during the 2006 and 2008 seasons. Meyer's winning percentage through the conclusion of the 2009 season (.842) was the highest among all active coaches with a minimum of five full seasons at a Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) program. He is a native of Ohio and an alumnus of the University of Cincinnati, where he played college football. During 2011, he worked as a college football analyst for the television sports network ESPN. In 2004, Meyer was recognized as the college football "coach of the year" at the University of Utah by both sportswriters (Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year) and television commentators (Home Depot Coach of the Year Award). He
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    Howard Schnellenberger

    Howard Schnellenberger

    • Current team head coached:
    Howard Schnellenberger (born March 16, 1934) is a retired American football coach with long service at both the professional and college levels. He was most recently the head coach at Florida Atlantic University, having announced his retirement on August 11, 2011, effective at the end of the 2011 season. He previously held head coaching positions with the University of Oklahoma, University of Louisville, University of Miami, where his team won a national championship, and the Baltimore Colts. He also worked extensively as an assistant coach at the college and pro levels, including as part of the staff of the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. Schnellenberger is also famous for recruiting Joe Namath to the University of Alabama for Bear Bryant in 1961. Schnellenberger was born to German immigrants. Schnellenberger graduated from Flaget High School in Louisville, Kentucky, where he played football, basketball and baseball before earning a scholarship to the University of Kentucky. Schnellenberger was an All-American (AP, 1955) end at Kentucky and worked as an assistant coach at Kentucky under head coach Blanton Collier in 1959 and 1960. There he joined the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity.
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    Bud Foster

    Bud Foster

    • Current team head coached:
    Bud Foster (born July 28, 1959) is a college football coach and former player. He is the current defensive coordinator for the Virginia Tech Hokies football team. Following the 2006 season, he received the Frank Broyles Award, which is annually given to the top assistant coach in college football. Foster indicated interest in the head coaching vacancy at West Virginia University after the 2007 season and most recently in the head coaching position at Clemson University in the middle of the 2008 season. Foster's 2005 and 2006 Hokie defenses led the nation in total defense. Foster went to high school in Nokomis, Illinois. A 1981 graduate of Murray State University, Foster played strong safety and outside linebacker from 1977 to 1980. Foster began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Murray State in 1981, Frank Beamer's first season as the head coach. After two years as a graduate assistant, Foster was elevated to a full-time staff position. He coached outside linebackers for three seasons before taking over the inside and outside linebackers in 1986. He also served as the Racers' recruiting coordinator and worked with special teams. Foster moved with head coach Beamer to
    10.00
    3 votes
    16
    Paul Brown

    Paul Brown

    • Current team head coached:
    Paul Eugene Brown (September 7, 1908 – August 5, 1991) was an American football coach in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League. Brown was the first coach of the Cleveland Browns, a team named after him, and later played a role in founding the Cincinnati Bengals. His teams won seven league championships in a professional coaching career spanning 25 seasons. Brown began his coaching career at Severn School in 1931 before becoming the head football coach at Massillon Washington High School in Massillon, Ohio, where he grew up. His high school teams lost only 10 games in 11 seasons. He was then hired at Ohio State University and coached the school to its first national football championship in 1942. After World War II, he became head coach of the Browns, who won four AAFC championships before joining the NFL in 1950. Brown coached the Browns to three NFL championships – in 1950, 1954 and 1955 – but was fired in January 1963 amid a power struggle with team owner Art Modell. Brown in 1968 co-founded and was the first coach of the Bengals. He retired from coaching in 1975 but remained the Bengals' team president until his death in 1991. The Bengals named their
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    Robert Zuppke

    Robert Zuppke

    • Current team head coached:
    Robert Carl Zuppke (July 2, 1879 – December 22, 1957) was an American football coach. He served the head coach at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 1913 until 1941, compiling a career college football record of 131–81–12. Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951, Zuppke coached his teams to national titles in 1914, 1919, 1923, and 1927. Zuppke's teams also won seven Big Ten Conference championships. While at the University of Illinois, Zuppke was a member of the Alpha-Gamma Chapter of Kappa Sigma. Among the players that Zuppke coached at Illinois, was Red Grange, the most celebrated college football player of the era. The field at the University of Illinois's Memorial Stadium is named Zuppke Field in his honor. Zuppke is credited for many football inventions and traditions, including the huddle and the flea flicker. Prior to coaching at the University of Illinois, Zuppke coached at Muskegon High School in Muskegon, Michigan and Oak Park and River Forest High School in Oak Park, Illinois, where he tutored future Pro Football Hall of Famer George Trafton. Zuppke led the team to state championships in 1911 and 1912. Zuppke also was a writer and a fine
    6.50
    6 votes
    18
    John McEwan

    John McEwan

    • Current team head coached:
    John James "Cap" McEwan (February 18, 1893 – August 9, 1970) was an American football player and coach. He played from 1913 to 1916 as a center at the United States Military Academy, where he was a three-time All-American and captain of the Army football squad for three seasons. McEwan served as the head football coach at West Point (1923–1925), the University of Oregon (1926–1929), and the College of the Holy Cross (1930–1932), compiling a career college football record of 59–23–6. He also coached at the professional level for the Brooklyn Dodgers of the National Football League. McEwan was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1962. From 1923 to 1925 McEwan led Army to an 18–5–3 record. All three of his seasons there were winning seasons. From 1926 to 1929 he took over as the head football coach at Oregon. His record there stands at 20–13–2, with his 1928 campaign having a 9–2 season.
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Johnny Vaught

    Johnny Vaught

    • Current team head coached:
    John Howard Vaught (May 6, 1909 – February 3, 2006) was an American college football coach at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 1947 to 1970 and again in 1973. Born in Olney, Texas, Vaught graduated as valedictorian from Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth, Texas and attended Texas Christian University, where he was an honor student and was named All-American. Vaught served as a line coach at the University of North Carolina under head coach Raymond Wolf from 1936 until 1941. In 1942, Vaught served as an assistant coach with the North Carolina Pre-Flight School. After serving in World War II as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy, he took a job as an assistant coach at Ole Miss in 1946, and was named head coach a year later. After winning the university's first conference title in his initial season in 1947, he led the Rebels to additional Southeastern Conference titles in 1954, 1955, 1960, 1962, and 1963. Vaught is the only coach in Ole Miss history to win an SEC football championship. Three of his teams, in 1959, 1960, and 1962, won shares of the national championship. His 1960 team received the Grantland Rice Award from the Football Writers Association
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Walter Camp

    Walter Camp

    • Current team head coached:
    Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was an American football player, coach, and sports writer known as the "Father of Football". With John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pop Warner, Fielding H. Yost, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most accomplished persons in the early history of American football. He played college football at Yale College from 1876 to 1882. Camp served as the head football coach at Yale from 1888 to 1892 before moving to Stanford University, where he coached in December 1892 and in 1894 and 1895. Camp's Yale teams of 1888, 1891, and 1892 have been recognized as national champions. Camp was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Camp was born in the city of New Britain, Connecticut, the son of Leverett Lee and Ellen Sophia (Cornwell) Camp. He attended Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, entered Yale College in 1875, and graduated in 1882. At Yale he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and Skull and Bones. He attended Yale Medical School, where his studies were interrupted first by an outbreak of typhoid fever and then by work for the Manhattan Watch Company. He worked for the New Haven Clock Company
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    Bo McMillin

    Bo McMillin

    • Current team head coached:
    Alvin Nugent "Bo" McMillin (January 12, 1895 – March 31, 1952) was an American football player and coach, who served at both the collegiate and professional levels. He played college football at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, where was a three-time All-American at quarterback, and led the Centre Praying Colonels to a historic upset victory over Harvard in 1921. After graduating from Centre, McMillin played professionally with the Milwaukee Badgers and Cleveland Indians, two early teams of the NFL, in 1922 and 1923. McMillin served as the head football coach at Centenary College of Louisiana (1922–1924), Geneva College (1925–1927), Kansas State University (1928–1933), and Indiana University (1934–1947), compiling a career college football coaching record of 140–77–13. He then returned to the NFL, coaching the Detroit Lions from 1948 to 1950 and the Philadelphia Eagles for the first two games of the 1951 season before he succumbed to a fatal illness. His career NFL coaching mark was 14–24. McMillin's legendary "poor mouthing", pronounced in his distinctive Texas drawl, was in sharp contrast to his teams' successes. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    Mac McWorter

    Mac McWorter

    • Current team head coached:
    Hamilton Pierce "Mac" McWhorter (born June 17, 1950) is the offensive line coach for the Penn State Nittany Lions and was the interim head coach for Georgia Tech's football team in 2001 after George O'Leary resigned and only coached for one game, the 2001 Seattle Bowl against No. 11-ranked Stanford. Tech won, 24 to 14, technically giving McWhorter the highest win percentage of any Georgia Tech football coach. McWhorter was an All-SEC guard at Georgia in 1973. McWhorter retired following the 2010 season with the Longhorns. The American Football Coaches of America voted Longhorn offensive line coach Mac McWhorter the top assistant coach in the country for 2008.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Bennie Owen

    Bennie Owen

    • Current team head coached:
    Benjamin Gilbert Owen (July 24, 1875 – February 26, 1970) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Washburn College, now Washburn University, in 1900, at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas from 1902 to 1904, and at the University of Oklahoma from 1905 to 1926, compiling a career college football record of 155–60–19. Owen was also the head basketball coach at Oklahoma from 1908 to 1921, tallying a mark of 113–49, and the head baseball coach at the school from 1906 to 1922, amassing a record of 142–102–4. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Owen was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1875 and his family moved to St. Louis, Missouri when he was 12. After he finished school, his family again moved, this time to Arkansas City, Kansas. There Owen served as an apprentice to a local doctor for three years. He then enrolled in the University of Kansas in 1897 to pursue his medical studies and he soon discovered his knack for football. Owen played football at Kansas under two excellent, but contrasting coaches. Wylie G. Woodruff, an All American player from the University of
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    J.T. King

    J.T. King

    • Current team head coached:
    J. T. King (October 22, 1912 – January 27, 1993(1993-01-27)) was an American football coach. He was the head football coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders from 1961 to 1969. He amassed a 44–45–3 record. Born in Wilmot, Arkansas, King graduated from Houston Reagan High School. Collegiately, he played offensive guard under coach Dana X. Bible at Texas. He later served as an assistant coach at his alma mater from 1950–52 and from 1954-56. King was appointed head coach at Texas Tech on November 29, 1960, after DeWitt Weaver resigned to enter private business in Alabama. King was the Texas Tech athletic director from 1970 until 1978. King was inducted to the University of Texas Men's Athletics Hall of Honor in 1981.
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Jim Thorpe

    Jim Thorpe

    • Current team head coached:
    James Francis "Jim" Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk): Wa-Tho-Huk, translated as "Bright Path"; May 28, 1888 – March 28, 1953) was an American athlete of mixed ancestry (Native American and Caucasian). Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals for the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, played American football (collegiate and professional), and also played professional baseball and basketball. He lost his Olympic titles after it was found he was paid for playing two seasons of semi-professional baseball before competing in the Olympics, thus violating the amateurism rules. In 1983, 30 years after his death, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) restored his Olympic medals. Of Native American and European American ancestry, Thorpe grew up in the Sac and Fox nation in Oklahoma. He played as part of several All-American Indian teams throughout his career, and "barnstormed" as a professional basketball player with a team composed entirely of American Indians. He played professional sports until age 41, the end of his sports career coinciding with the start of the Great Depression. Thorpe struggled to earn a living after that, working several
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    Barry Switzer

    Barry Switzer

    • Current team head coached:
    Barry Switzer (born October 5, 1937) is a former football coach, active in the college and professional ranks between 1962 and 1997. He has one of the highest winning percentages of any college football coach in history, and is one of only two head coaches to win both a college football national championship and a Super Bowl (the other being a rival college head coach Jimmy Johnson.) Born in Crossett, Arkansas, Switzer's father Frank was a bootlegger who was arrested at the family house. His mother Mary Louise raised Barry and his brother Donnie, but on August 26, 1959 she shot herself. Barry accepted an athletic scholarship and played football at the University of Arkansas. After graduation, he did a brief stint in the U.S. Army and then returned to Arkansas as an assistant coach. Following the 1966 season, Switzer moved to the University of Oklahoma as an assistant coach under new head coach and good friend, Jim Mackenzie. After Mackenzie died of a heart attack following spring practice of 1967, Switzer continued as an assistant under former University of Houston assistant and new Oklahoma head coach Chuck Fairbanks. Switzer quickly made a name for himself by perfecting the
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Ralph Glaze

    Ralph Glaze

    • Current team head coached:
    Daniel Ralph Glaze (March 13, 1882 – October 31, 1968) was an American athlete and coach who played as a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, and later became a football and baseball coach and administrator at several colleges. Glaze was born in Denver, Colorado, and was recruited by Dartmouth College after displaying his skill in two sports. He played football at the University of Colorado in the 1901 season under coach Fred Folsom, a Dartmouth alumnus who became that school's coach in 1903. Glaze enrolled at Dartmouth in 1902, being followed there by his younger brother, John. Under Folsom, he played a notable role in the school's first-ever football victory over Harvard in 1903, a game in which Harvard dedicated its new stadium. In 1905, Glaze was named an All-American as an end by Walter Camp, even though at 5'8" and 153 pounds he was the smallest player on Dartmouth's team that year. Glaze also played baseball at Dartmouth, and pitched a no-hitter against Columbia. During summers, Glaze played semi-pro ball in Colorado, using an assumed name to protect his college eligibility. In 1905 he met an opposing catcher named John Tortes, a Native American, and encouraged him
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Ernie Nevers

    Ernie Nevers

    • Current team head coached:
    Ernest Alonzo Nevers (June 11, 1902 - May 3, 1976) was an American professional athlete who played American football as a fullback for the Duluth Eskimos and the Chicago Cardinals of the National Football League, as well as baseball as a pitcher for the St. Louis Browns. Nevers was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963. Nevers attended Superior Central High School (Superior, Wisconsin) and Santa Rosa High School (Santa Rosa, California), where he excelled in football. In 1920, as a senior, he led the team to the NCS Championships. In 1925, the American football field at Santa Rosa High School was renamed Nevers Field in his honor. Nevers went on to attend Stanford University, where he was All-America and played in the 1925 Rose Bowl against the University of Notre Dame and the famous Four Horsemen backfield. He played all 60 minutes in the game and rushed for 114 yards, more yardage than all the Four Horsemen combined. He was named the 1925 Rose Bowl Player of the Game. Former coach Glenn Scobey "Pop" Warner called Nevers "the football player without a fault". Nevers often was compared to Jim Thorpe. Nevers' #1 jersey is
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Jim Zorn

    Jim Zorn

    • Current team head coached:
    James Arthur "Jim" Zorn (born May 10, 1953) is an American quarterbacks coach in the National Football League. He was formerly the quarterbacks coach for the Baltimore Ravens and now holds that same position with the Kansas City Chiefs. Zorn was a left-handed quarterback, and is best known as the youthful and charismatic leader of the (then-expansion) Seattle Seahawks of the NFL, for their first seven-and-a-half seasons. He was the quarterbacks coach for the Seattle Seahawks in the 2007 season. He was hired by the Washington Redskins to be their head coach starting with the 2008 season and remained head coach until being fired in the early morning of January 4, 2010, the day after the final game of his second season as coach. Shortly thereafter, Zorn was hired as quarterbacks coach of the Baltimore Ravens. Zorn was released as quarterbacks coach of the Ravens on January 27, 2011. Zorn was added to the Kansas City Chiefs coaching staff as their new quarterbacks coach on February 15, 2011. Zorn graduated from Gahr High School in Cerritos, California in 1971, and played college football at Cal Poly Pomona for the Broncos. Zorn was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Dallas
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Kevin R. Wilson

    Kevin R. Wilson

    • Current team head coached: Indiana Hoosiers football
    Kevin R. Wilson (born October 23, 1961) is an American football coach. He is currently the head coach of the Indiana Hoosiers. Wilson played offensive line and linebacker at Maiden High School. He was all-conference for two seasons and for his senior season was named to the Charlotte Observer All-Piedmont team. He played center and guard for the University of North Carolina Tar Heels as a walk-on. After two seasons as a walk-on he earned a scholarship. He earned a degree in Mathematics in 1984, and then became a graduate assistant for three years while working on a masters' degree in Physical Education. While at North Carolina Randy Walker was a Tar Heels assistant. When Walker left North Carolina to become head coach at Miami University in 1990, Wilson became his assistant there. After playing for the North Carolina Tar Heels, he spent three seasons (1984–1986) as a graduate assistant coach while he worked on this masters degree. In 1987, he became the offensive line coach at Winston-Salem State University. Wilson was the offensive coordinator for the 1988 season for the North Carolina A&T Aggies. In 1989 he became the head coach and athletic director of Fred T. Foard High School,
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Guy Chamberlin

    Guy Chamberlin

    • Current team head coached:
    Berlin Guy "Champ" Chamberlin (January 16, 1894 – April 4, 1967) was a professional American football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL). He played at Nebraska Wesleyan University and then at the University of Nebraska, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He graduated from Nebraska in 1916. Originally a halfback, in 1915 he moved to end and was named All-American end. He served in the United States Army from 1917 to 1919. He served as player-coach on four NFL title teams: 1922 and 1923 Canton Bulldogs, 1924 Cleveland Bulldogs, and 1926 Frankford Yellow Jackets. In 1925, Chamberlin became player-coach of the NFL Frankford Yellow Jackets, who finished only sixth that year, with a record of 13-7. In 1926, the Yellow Jackets went 14-1-1 to win the NFL Championship, Chamberlin's fourth in five seasons of coaching. The following year, he went to the Chicago Cardinals as a player for one season, then became the team's coach in 1928, after which he retired when the Cardinals managed only one win against six losses. His career NFL coaching record was 56 wins, 14 losses, and 5 ties. Chamberlin returned to Blue Springs in 1932, where he became a farmer,
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Bill O'Brien

    Bill O'Brien

    • Current team head coached: Penn State Nittany Lions football
    Bill O'Brien (born October 23, 1969) is the head football coach at Penn State. O'Brien began his coaching career in 1993 with Brown before spending more than a decade coaching in the ACC. He joined the New England Patriots in 2007 where he eventually served as quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator in 2011. After graduating from St. John's Preparatory School in Danvers, Massachusetts, O'Brien attended Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where he played defensive end and linebacker for the Bears from 1990-92. O'Brien's first coaching position was at Brown, where he coached tight ends in 1993 then inside linebackers in 1994. He would then spend the next three seasons (1995–1997) as an offensive graduate assistant at the Georgia Tech. He then coached the Yellow Jackets' running backs from the 1998 season through 2000 season. From 2001 to 2002, O'Brien served as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach and was named an assistant head coach for the 2002 season. As Offensive Coordinator at Georgia Tech in 2001 and 2002 his teams averaged 31 and 21.5 points per game, respectively as the teams went 9–4 and 7–6. In 2003, he left to coach running backs at the University
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Ben Schwartzwalder

    Ben Schwartzwalder

    • Current team head coached:
    Floyd B. "Ben" Schwartzwalder (June 2, 1909 – April 28, 1993) was a Hall of Fame football coach at Syracuse University, where he trained such future National Football League stars as Jim Brown, as well as the first African American to win the Heisman Trophy, Ernie Davis. Schwartzwalder played center at West Virginia University, despite weighing only 146 pounds, and was an all-campus wrestler in 1930 in the 155 pound weight class. He was captain of the football team in 1933. Schwartzwalder was born in Point Pleasant, West Virginia. He coached high school football for six years in West Virginia — a year at Sistersville High School, followed by the Parkersburg High School Big Reds football from 1936 to 1940 — and Ohio — a year at Canton McKinley High School — and won two state championships. In 1941, he was coach of Canton McKinley High School in Ohio when, even though he was in his 30s, he commissioned in the US Army and fought in World War II. As a captain in the 82nd Airborne (CO of Company G of the 507th), Schwartzwalder earned distinction during the invasion of Normandy and battles that followed in the last days of the war. He played key roles in the capture of the La Fière
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Jim Tressel

    Jim Tressel

    • Current team head coached:
    James Patrick "Jim" Tressel (born December 5, 1952) is an American football coach and educator, currently serving as the Vice President of Strategic Engagement for the University of Akron. He was football head coach at Ohio State University from 2001 to 2011 and at Youngstown State University from 1986 to 2000. Tressel's Youngstown State teams won four NCAA Division I-AA Football Championships, and he was hired by the Buckeyes before the 2001 season to replace John Cooper. During his tenure as Ohio State's 22nd head football coach, Tressel's teams played in three BCS National Championship Games. His 2002 squad won a national title and achieved the first 14–0 season record in major college football since Penn went 15–0 in 1897. Tressel finished his career at Ohio State with an official overall record of 94–22 (.810), including six Big Ten Conference championships, a 5–4 bowl record, a 4–3 mark in BCS bowl games, and an 8–1 record against the arch-rival Michigan Wolverines. Tressel's eight wins against Michigan place him second in school history to Woody Hayes, who had 16. He is the only Ohio State head coach to win seven consecutive games against the Wolverines. Tressel resigned as
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    John Markey

    John Markey

    • Current team head coached:
    David John Markey (October 7, 1882 – July 1963) was an American politician, Army officer, businessman, and college football coach. He is probably most notable for a controversial unsuccessful campaign for a United States Senate seat against former Maryland governor Herbert R. O'Conor in 1946. Markey was also the ninth head coach for the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) football team from 1902 to 1904. Markey was born in Frederick, Maryland on October 7, 1882 to parents John Hanshew and Ida Maria (née Willard) Markey. D. John Markey attended Frederick City High School. In 1898, he left high school and volunteered to serve in the Spanish-American War in the United States Army as part of a company of the First Maryland Infantry Regiment raised in Frederick. One of his ancestors, Johann David Markey, immigrated to Frederick from the Electorate of the Palatinate in 1736. Johann David Markey's son of the same name served in the War of 1812 and with the 16th Regiment of the Maryland Militia. The Markey family was alternatively described as of Scotch-Irish origin and "early settled in Frederick County". Markey's grandfather, also D. John Markey, was an owner
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    John Maulbetsch

    John Maulbetsch

    • Current team head coached:
    John F. "Johnny" Maulbetsch (June 20, 1890 – September 14, 1950) was an All-American football halfback at Adrian College in 1911 and for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1914 to 1916. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. After playing with an independent football team in Ann Arbor and at Adrian College, Maulbetsch became one of the most famous American football players in 1914 while playing for the University of Michigan. Maulbetsch became known as the "Human Bullet" because of his unusual low, line-plunging style of play, and was also known as the "Featherweight Fullback" because of his light weight and small size. After his performance against Harvard in 1914, in which some reports indicated he gained more than 300 yards, eastern writers, including Damon Runyan, wrote articles touting Maulbetsch. Maulbetsch was also selected by Walter Camp to his All-American team. In 1915, Maulbetsch underwent surgery for appendicitis and did not perform to the same level as he had in 1914. He made a comeback as a senior in 1916 and was again one of the leading players in college football. Between 1917 and 1920, Maulbetsch was the head football coach at Phillips
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Mike Brown

    Mike Brown

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael "Mike" Brown (born August 10, 1935) is the owner of the Cincinnati Bengals, an American football team in the National Football League. He is the son of former Cleveland Browns, Ohio State University and Cincinnati Bengals coach/co-founder, Paul Brown. Brown's ownership has been criticized for a lack of on-field success, his refusal to cede football operations to a general manager and the team's relationship with Hamilton County before and after a voter-approved tax increase to fund Paul Brown Stadium. He is one of two living sons by Paul Brown (His brother, Pete, is currently the Senior Vice-President of Bengals' player personnel. His older brother, Robin, died of cancer in 1978.) He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1957, where he played quarterback for their football team, and from Harvard Law School in 1959. In an unusual meeting between future sports owners, eventual New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner hired him to a summer job as a deck hand for Kinsman Marine Transit Company. Brown eventually followed his father into football management. Paul Brown founded the Bengals, then an American Football League team, in 1968. (This was several years after Paul Brown
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Bo Pelini

    Bo Pelini

    • Current team head coached: Nebraska Cornhuskers football
    Mark "Bo" Pelini (born December 13, 1967) is the head football coach at the University of Nebraska. He had previously been defensive coordinator for the LSU Tigers, Oklahoma Sooners, and the Nebraska Cornhuskers. On December 2, 2007, one day after coaching in the 2007 SEC Championship Game, Pelini was named as head coach at Nebraska by athletic director Tom Osborne. Pelini was raised in Youngstown, Ohio, a former center of steel production with a strong athletic tradition. He was nicknamed "Bo" after former Cleveland Browns running back Bo Scott. After graduating from Youngstown Cardinal Mooney High School (the same high school as Oklahoma Sooners Head Coach Bob Stoops), he went on to play free safety for Ohio State University Buckeyes under Earle Bruce and later John Cooper from 1987 to 1990, as a starter in his last two years. Pelini served as a team co-captain in his senior year, along with Vinnie Clark, Jeff Graham and Greg Frey. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business marketing from Ohio State University in 1990 while playing for the Buckeyes. Following his playing career, Pelini began his coaching career at the University of Iowa as a graduate assistant for the Iowa
    5.83
    6 votes
    39
    Kevin Sumlin

    Kevin Sumlin

    • Current team head coached:
    Kevin Sumlin (born August 3, 1964) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Texas A&M University, a position he accepted in December 2011. Sumlin was the head football coach at the University of Houston from 2007 to 2011. Kevin Sumlin was born in Brewton, Alabama on August 3, 1964. He later attended Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School in Indianapolis, where he played football. Sumlin served as an assistant with Washington State, Wyoming, Minnesota and Purdue; served as assistant head coach at Texas A&M for two years under R.C. Slocum(in the second half of his last season at A&M he took over offensive coordinator duties from Dino Babers); and for five years at Oklahoma under Bob Stoops(hired after dominating the Sooners the previous season), serving the last 2 years as co-offensive coordinator . In addition to Stoops and Slocum, he has served as an assistant under Mike Price, Joe Tiller, and Dennis Erickson. In his final year with the Sooners, his offense was one of the best in the country, averaging 44 points per game. In December 2009, it was announced that Sumlin was a finalist for the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award. In 2011, Sumlin
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Bobby Ross

    Bobby Ross

    • Current team head coached:
    Robert Joseph Ross (born December 23, 1936) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at The Citadel (1973–1977), the University of Maryland, College Park (1982–1986), the Georgia Institute of Technology (1987–1991), and the United States Military Academy (2004–2006), compiling a career college football record of 103–101–2. Ross was also the head coach of the National Football League's San Diego Chargers from 1992 to 1996 and the Detroit Lions from 1997 to 2000, tallying a career NFL mark of 77–68. He guided his 1990 Georgia Tech squad to a share of the national championship and coached the 1994 San Diego Chargers to an appearance in Super Bowl XXIX. After graduating from Benedictine High School in 1955, Ross enrolled at the Virginia Military Institute, where he started at quarterback and defensive back for two seasons and served as captain of the football team as a senior. Ross graduated from VMI in 1959 with a bachelor of arts degree in English and history. Following a tour of duty in the United States Army as a first lieutenant (1960–1962), Ross found work coaching high school football. He coached at Colonial Heights High School, and at
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Norm Chow

    Norm Chow

    • Current team head coached: Hawaii Warriors football
    Norman Chow (Chinese: 周友賢; pinyin: Zhōu Yǒuxián, born May 5, 1946) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, a position he assumed in December 2011. Chow previously held the offensive coordinator position for the Utah Utes, UCLA Bruins, the NFL's Tennessee Titans, USC Trojans, NC State Wolfpack, and BYU Cougars. Chow won the 2002 Broyles Award as the nation's top collegiate assistant coach. He also was named the 2002 NCAA Division I-A Offensive Coordinator of the Year by American Football Monthly and was named the National Assistant Coach of the Year in 1999 by the American Football Foundation. He is well known for developing quarterbacks such as Jim McMahon, Steve Young, Ty Detmer, Philip Rivers, Carson Palmer, and Matt Leinart. Chow, a native of Honolulu, and an alumnus of Punahou School, played college football for the University of Utah. Chow was a 2-year starter and a three-year letterman offensive guard for the Utes. In his senior season, Chow was named to the All-WAC first team and gained All-America honorable mention honors. He then played briefly in the Canadian Football League, for the
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Tom Landry

    Tom Landry

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas Wade "Tom" Landry (September 11, 1924–February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. He is ranked as one of the greatest and most innovative coaches in National Football League (NFL) history, creating many new formations and methods. He invented the now popular 4–3 defense, and the "flex defense" system made famous by the "Doomsday Defense" squads he created during his 29 year tenure with the Dallas Cowboys. Landry won two Super Bowl titles (VI, XII), 5 NFC titles, 13 Divisional titles, and compiled a 270-178-6 record, the 3rd most wins of all time for an NFL coach. His 20 career playoff victories are the most of any coach in NFL history. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 1966 and the NFC Coach of the Year in 1975. His most impressive professional accomplishment is his 20 consecutive winning seasons (1966–1985), an NFL record that remains unbroken and unchallenged. Also from 1965 to 1981 the Cowboys won 17 consecutive regular season openers, also an NFL record that remains unbroken and unchallenged. Under Landry the Cowboys had a record of 41-11 in regular season games in the month of Dec. from 1965 to 1982, and 24-4 from 1970 to 1979 to either clinch
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Fielding Yost

    Fielding Yost

    • Current team head coached:
    Fielding Harris Yost (April 30, 1871 – August 20, 1946) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Ohio Wesleyan University (1897), the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (1898), the University of Kansas (1899), Stanford University (1900), San Jose State University (1900), and the University of Michigan (1901–1923, 1925–1926), compiling a career college football record of 198–35–12. During his 25 seasons as the head football coach in Ann Arbor, Yost's Michigan Wolverines won six national championships, captured ten Big Ten Conference titles, and amassed a record of 165–29–10. From 1901 to 1905, his "Point-a-Minute" squads went 55–1–1, outscoring their opponents by a margin of 2,821 to 42. The 1901 team beat Stanford, 49–0, in the 1902 Rose Bowl, the first college football bowl game ever played. In 1921, Yost became Michigan's athletic director and served in that capacity until 1940. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Yost was also a lawyer, author, and businessman. Yost was born in Fairview, West Virginia. He enrolled at Ohio Normal School (now known as Ohio Northern
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    John Heisman

    John Heisman

    • Current team head coached:
    John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was an American player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Oberlin College (1892, 1894), Buchtel College—now known as the University of Akron (1893–1894), Auburn University (1895–1899), Clemson University (1900–1903), Georgia Tech (1904–1919), the University of Pennsylvania (1920–1922), Washington & Jefferson College (1923), and Rice University (1924–1927), compiling a career college football record of 186–70–18. His 1917 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets have been recognized as a national champion. Heisman was also the head basketball coach at Georgia Tech (1908–1909, 1912–1914), tallying a mark of 9–14, and the head baseball coach at Buchtel (1894), Clemson (1899–1904), and Georgia Tech (1904–1917), amassing a career college baseball record of 219–119–7. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. The Heisman Trophy, awarded annually to the season's most outstanding college football player, is named after him. Heisman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, but grew up in Titusville, Pennsylvania, where he played football for Titusville High School,
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    R. C. Slocum

    R. C. Slocum

    • Current team head coached:
    Richard Copeland Slocum (born November 7, 1944), better known as R. C. Slocum, was the head football coach at Texas A&M University from 1989 until 2002. He has won more games as coach (123) than anyone else in Texas A&M football history. Raised in Orange, Texas, Slocum attended McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He has two sons, Shawn and John Harvey. Shawn served as an assistant on Slocum's staff which helped his father on to his winning record and is now the Special Teams Coordinator for the Green Bay Packers. John Harvey is employed as Global Account Manager for LeTourneau Technologies. Slocum began his career as a football coach at a Lake Charles high school in 1968. Two years later, in 1970, Slocum became a graduate assistant at Kansas State University under head coach Vince Gibson. In 1971, he was named Head Freshman Coach. Slocum spent the 1981 season as the defensive coordinator at the University of Southern California. The team was led by head coach John Robinson. Slocum's defense led the Pac-10 in total defense that season. The team lost to Penn State in the Fiesta Bowl, finishing with a 9–3 record. In 1972, Slocum was hired as a receiver coach under
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Turner Gill

    Turner Gill

    • Current team head coached: Liberty Flames
    Turner Hillery Gill (born August 13, 1962) is currently the head football coach at Liberty. Gill's previous coaching job was as the head coach at University of Kansas from 2010–2011, and was one of 11 African-American head coaches in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision at the time of his hiring. Gill graduated from Arlington Heights High School in Fort Worth, Texas where he was an all-state, all-county and all-district quarterback for Coach Merlin Priddy. During his senior season, Gill was courted heavily by Nebraska, as well as arch-rival Oklahoma, and Texas. Nebraska won the spirited battle for Gill, in part because they would allow Turner to play baseball as well as football, but also because head coach Tom Osborne had managed to quell any rumors about Nebraska supposedly being reluctant to play an African-American at quarterback. Gill arrived on campus in 1980 and saw limited action in mop-up duty as a freshman, which at the time was still relatively unusual, as freshmen had only been recently allowed under NCAA rules to participate at the varsity level. Nebraska started the 1981 season poorly, losing two of its first three games and performing anemically on offense
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Vernon Louis Parrington

    Vernon Louis Parrington

    • Current team head coached:
    Vernon Louis Parrington (August 3, 1871 – June 16, 1929) was an American historian and football coach. His liberal ("progressive") interpretation of American history was highly influential in the 1920s to 1940s, when it fell out of favor. Born in Aurora, Illinois to a Republican family that soon moved to Kansas, Parrington attended Emporia College and Harvard College (BA 1893). He was appalled by the hardships of Kansas farmers in the 1890s, and began moving left. After teaching English at Emporia College (now Emporia State University) he moved to the University of Oklahoma in 1897, where he taught British literature, organized the department of English, coached the football team, played on the baseball team, edited the campus newspaper, and tried to beautify the campus. He published little and in 1908 he was fired due to pressures from religious groups who wanted all "immoral faculty" fired. From there he went on to a distinguished academic career at the University of Washington. Parrington moved to the much friendlier University of Washington in Seattle in 1908. He recalled in 1918, "With every passing year my radicalism draws fresh nourishment from large knowledge of the evils
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Bump Elliott

    Bump Elliott

    • Current team head coached:
    Chalmers W. "Bump" Elliott (born January 30, 1925) is a former American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played halfback at Purdue University (1943–1944) and the University of Michigan (1946–1947). Elliott grew up in Bloomington, Illinois, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps as a senior in high school and was assigned to the V-12 Navy College Training Program at Purdue University. He received varsity letters in football, baseball, and basketball at Purdue, before being called into active duty in late 1944, serving with the Marines in China. After being discharged from the military, he enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1946 and joined the football team for whom his brother Pete Elliott played quarterback. In 1947, he played for an undefeated and untied Michigan football team known as the "Mad Magicians", led the Big Nine Conference in scoring, won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Most Valuable Player in the Conference, and was selected as an All-American by the American Football Coaches Association. After graduating from Michigan in 1948, Elliott spent ten years as an assistant football coach at Oregon State, Iowa, and
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Gomer Jones

    Gomer Jones

    • Current team head coached:
    Gomer Thomas Jones (February 26, 1914 – March 21, 1971) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played college football as a center at Ohio State University from 1933 to 1935. After serving at an assistant coach for 17 years under Bud Wilkinson at the University of Oklahoma, Jones helmed the Sooners for two seasons in 1964 and 1965, compiling a record of 9–11–1. He was also the athletic director at Oklahoma from 1964 until his death in 1971. Jones was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1978. Jones was one of the outstanding college football players in the 1930s. From 1933 to 1935, he played at Ohio State University as a center on offense and a linebacker on defense. Jones was the anchor of the Buckeyes' offensive line, and was named team MVP following the 1934 and 1935 seasons. In 1935, he was named team captain and was a consensus All-American. Jones was selected by the Chicago Cardinals in the second round of the 1936 NFL Draft as the 15th player selected overall. However, he chose instead to pursue a career in coaching. During his time at Ohio State, Jones was a member of the Alpha Rho Chapter of the Pi Kappa
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Steve Logan

    Steve Logan

    • Current team head coached:
    Steve Logan (born February 3, 1953) is an American football coach. Most recently, he served as the running backs coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL), a position he held from 2009 to 2011. Logan was the head football coach at East Carolina University from 1992 to 2002, compiling a record of 69–58. Logan was born in Lawton, Oklahoma and grew up in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. He attended Broken Arrow High School where he lettered in football, basketball and track. Logan was recruited by coach Bud Elliott to play football at Emporia State University, a Division II school in Emporia, Kansas. He played one season as a defensive back for the Hornets before deciding to end his playing career. Logan then transferred to the University of Tulsa, planning to pursue a career in college teaching. After graduating in 1975, he was hired as a physical education teacher and assistant football coach at Union High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His first collegiate coaching position was a one-year stint as tight ends coach at Oklahoma State University under head coach Jimmy Johnson. He then spent the next two years as head football coach at Hutchinson Community College, a
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Percy Haughton

    Percy Haughton

    • Current team head coached:
    Percy Duncan Haughton (July 11, 1876 – October 27, 1924) was an American football and baseball player and coach. He served as head football coach at Cornell University from 1899 to 1900, at Harvard University from 1908 to 1916, and at Columbia University from 1923 to 1924, compiling a career college football record of 97–17–6. The Harvard Crimson claim national champions for three of the seasons that Haughton coached: 1910, 1912, and 1913. Haughton was also Harvard's head baseball coach in 1915 and part owner of the Boston Braves from 1916 to 1918. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Haughton attended Groton School for high school, graduating in 1895, and then went on to Harvard, graduating in 1899. Haughton and his wife owned Gould Island in Rhode Island where Haughton trained the Harvard football team. Haughton became Columbia's football coach in spring 1923 as the school re-established a team that had been dissolved in 1905 following allegations that football had become too violent. To alleviate concerns that the game was still too violent, Haughton promised to instill discipline in his players, saying: "It will be my purpose to teach the
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    F. H. Peters

    F. H. Peters

    • Current team head coached:
    Francis Henry Peters was an American college football coach. He served as head coach for the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1900. A native of Wesley Station, Maryland, Peters attended the Maryland Agricultural College, where he played on the football team as an end from 1898 to 1900. During the 1899 season, Peters served as acting captain in place of Sam Cooke who had suffered an injury, and he was elected team captain and served as player-coach for the 1900 season. The Aggies finished the 1900 season with a 3–4–1 record. At the Maryland Agricultural College, Peters also played on the baseball team as a right fielder, and competed in the hammer throw, shot put, broad jump and hurdles events as a member of the track and field team.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Pat Fitzgerald

    Pat Fitzgerald

    • Current team head coached: Northwestern Wildcats football
    Pat Fitzgerald (born (1974-12-02)December 2, 1974) is the current head coach of the Northwestern University Wildcats football team. He was selected after the unexpected death of Randy Walker and announced at a press conference on July 7, 2006. He was 31 at the time of his appointment, making him the youngest coach in the Big Ten Conference and in NCAA Division I-A football by five years. With Lane Kiffin's hiring at the University of Tennessee on December 1, 2008, Fitzgerald lost his status as the youngest coach by about six months. Fitzgerald starred at linebacker for the Wildcats in the mid-1990s, helping to lead the team to a 10–1 regular season record in 1995 and a berth in the 1996 Rose Bowl, the school's first appearance there since 1949. Fitzgerald was unable to play in the game, however, after breaking his leg in the next-to-last game of the 1995 season against Iowa. Fitzgerald returned for the 1996 season, leading the Wildcats to the 1997 Citrus Bowl. In his playing career, he twice was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year and won both the Bronko Nagurski Trophy and the Chuck Bednarik Award in 1995 and again in 1996, becoming the first two-time winner of both
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Sammy Baugh

    Sammy Baugh

    • Current team head coached:
    Samuel Adrian "Slingin' Sammy" Baugh (March 17, 1914 – December 17, 2008) was an American football player and coach. He played college football for the Horned Frogs at Texas Christian University, where he was a two-time All-American. He then played in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins from 1937 to 1952. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in the 17-member charter class of 1963. Baugh was born on a farm near Temple, Texas, the second son of James, a worker on the Santa Fe Railroad, and Lucy Baugh. His parents later divorced and his mother raised the three children. When he was 16, the family then moved to Sweetwater, Texas, and he attended Sweetwater High School. As the quarterback of his high school football team (Sweetwater Mustangs), he would practice for hours throwing a football through a swinging automobile tire, often on the run. But apparently, Baugh would practice punting more than throwing. Baugh, however, really wanted to become a professional baseball player and almost received a scholarship to play at Washington State University. About a month before he started at Washington State, however, Baugh hurt his knee while sliding into
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Phil Bengtson

    Phil Bengtson

    • Current team head coached:
    John Phillip Bengtson (July 17, 1913 – December 18, 1994) was a college football player and longtime assistant coach on the collegiate and NFL levels, chiefly remembered as the successor to Vince Lombardi as head coach of the Green Bay Packers in 1968. Bengtson was a native of Roseau, Minnesota, and played tackle under Bernie Bierman at the University of Minnesota during the 1930s. In 1934, he earned All-America honors with the Golden Gophers, working in tandem with a player who would go on to coaching immortality: quarterback Bud Wilkinson. Bengtson took his first assistant coaching job at the Missouri in 1935, but soon returned to his alma mater as line coach, staying through the 1939 season. Beginning in 1940, he moved to Stanford, where he served as an assistant coach for twelve years. Bengtson moved to the professional level in 1952 with the nearby San Francisco 49ers. In seven seasons with the Niners, Bengtson would serve under three head coaches: (Buck Shaw, Red Strader, Frankie Albert) before being dismissed with Albert after the 1958 season. Soon after, he was one of the first four assistants hired in Lombardi's first week with the Packers in early February 1959. Phil
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Tyrone Willingham

    Tyrone Willingham

    • Current team head coached:
    Lionel Tyrone "Ty" Willingham (born December 30, 1953) is a former American football player and coach. He was the head coach at Stanford University (1995–2001), the University of Notre Dame (2002–2004), and the University of Washington (2005–2008), compiling a career college football record of 76–88–1. Willingham attended Jacksonville Senior High School in Jacksonville, North Carolina and lettered in football, basketball, and baseball. He went on to Michigan State University where he played football and baseball and graduated in 1977 with a degree in physical education. Willingham held assistant coaching positions at his alma mater (1977, 1980–82), Central Michigan University (1978–79), North Carolina State University (1983–85), Rice University (1986–88), and Stanford University (1989–91). When Stanford head coach, Dennis Green, was hired as the Minnesota Vikings head coach in 1992, Willingham followed him as running backs coach (1992–94). Following the 1994 season, despite lacking experience as a head coach or coordinator, Willingham was appointed head coach of the football program at Stanford, succeeding Bill Walsh. In his seven seasons (1995–2001) as coach, he led the Cardinal
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Bill Orwig

    Bill Orwig

    • Current team head coached:
    James Wilfred "Bill" Orwig (January 1, 1907 - August 3, 1994) was a basketball and American football player at the University of Michigan. He later served as the athletic director at the University of Toledo, University of Nebraska, and Indiana University. Raised in Toledo, Ohio, Orwig was an all-state athlete in high school and went on to be an All-Big Ten basketball player at Michigan. He received three varsity letters in basketball and one in football. After graduating from Michigan, Orwig was a successful high school football and basketball coach from 1931-1945 in Benton Harbor, Michigan and Toledo. He helped develop an athletic program for the occupation forces in Germany and became the athletic director, football coach, and basketball coach at the University of Toledo after World War II. From 1948-1951, Orwig was an assistant football coach at Michigan in charge of ends, participating in Michigan's 1948 national championship team and the 1950 team that won the Big Ten championship and the Rose Bowl. He accepted a job as athletic director at the University of Nebraska in 1954 and remained there for seven years. In 1961, he was hired as athletic director at Indiana University
    6.00
    5 votes
    58
    Pappy Waldorf

    Pappy Waldorf

    • Current team head coached:
    Lynn Osbert "Pappy" Waldorf (October 3, 1902 – August 15, 1981) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, now Oklahoma State University–Stillwater, (1929–1933), Kansas State University (1934), Northwestern University (1935–1946), and the University of California, Berkeley (1947–1956), compiling a career college football record of 157–89–19. Waldorf had the most career victories of any Cal head coach at 67 until he was surpassed in 2010 by current head coach Jeff Tedford. Waldorf was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1966. Waldorf, son of Methodist bishop Ernest Lynn Waldorf, was born in Clifton Springs, New York. As a collegiate athlete, Waldorf played tackle for Syracuse University from 1922 to 1924. Waldorf began his major college career as head football coach at Oklahoma A&M from 1929 to 1933. In his five seasons at Oklahoma A&M Waldorf went 34–10–7, won three Missouri Valley Conference championships, and never lost to arch-rival Oklahoma. In 1932, Waldorf was also promoted to Director of Athletics at the school. Nevertheless, in 1934, Waldorf was coaxed north to Kansas State,
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Pat Ruel

    Pat Ruel

    • Current team head coached:
    Golden Pat Ruel (born December 5, 1950) is an offensive line coach for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League. Ruel has 35 years of college and National Football League coaching experience. He lettered at offensive guard for University of Miami under head coach Fran Curci and received his B.S. in psychology in 1972 where he immediately became a graduate assistant coach in 1973. He and USC Head Coach Pete Carroll were both graduate assistants on the 1977 Arkansas Razorbacks football team. Current Mississippi Head Coach Houston Nutt was also at Arkansas at the same time, as a backup quarterback. Arkansas' Defensive Coordinator at the time, Monte Kiffin, would be a mentor to Carroll who would later have his son Lane Kiffin as his offensive coordinator at USC. The Razorbacks won the 1978 Orange Bowl that season and Ruel would move on to a full-time position at Washington State University. He spent four years with the Cougars, the first 2 seasons as the offensive line coach before adding offensive coordinator duties for his final two seasons. Ruel's longest tenure was at Kansas from 1988–96, the first 3 as the offensive coordinator and offensive line coach, then adding
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Tom Flores

    Tom Flores

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas R. "Tom" Flores (born March 21, 1937) is a retired American football quarterback and coach. Flores and Mike Ditka are the only two people in the National Football League history to win a Championship (1 AFL Championship, Super Bowl XI as an Assistant Coach and Super Bowls XV and XVIII) as a player, as an assistant coach, and as a head coach. Flores was also the first Hispanic starting quarterback and the first minority head coach in professional football history to win a Super Bowl. Flores is currently a radio announcer. Flores played quarterback for two seasons at Fresno City College beginning in 1955. He was active off the field as well serving on the Student Council as well as President of the Associated Men's Students. He received an academic scholarship to study at the College (now University) of the Pacific. Flores graduated from the University of the Pacific in 1958, but was unable to find a job in professional football. He was cut by the Calgary Stampeders of the CFL in 1958, and then by the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL) in 1959. In 1960 Flores finally landed a position as a quarterback with the American Football League's Oakland Raiders,
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Gary Barnett

    Gary Barnett

    • Current team head coached:
    Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Fort Lewis College (1982–1983), Northwestern University (1992–1998), and the University of Colorado at Boulder (1999–2005), compiling a career college football record of 92–94–2. His 1995 Northwestern team won the Big Ten Conference title, the first for the program since 1936, and played in the school's first Rose Bowl since 1949. At Colorado, Barnett was suspended briefly in the 2004 offseason due to events stemming from allegations of sexual misconduct by several members of the football team. Barnett attended Parkway Central High School in Chesterfield, Missouri and graduated from the University of Missouri in 1969 with a bachelors degree in social studies. He continued on to get his masters degree in 1971 in education. Barnett played wide receiver for Missouri from 1966–1969. He lettered his senior year under coach Dan Devine. Barnett started his coaching career at the University of Missouri as a graduate assistant from 1969–1971 under coach Al Onofrio. After he graduated, he was a successful high school coach at Air Academy High School in Colorado Springs, Colorado
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Tom Coughlin

    Tom Coughlin

    • Current team head coached: New York Giants
    Thomas Richard Coughlin (born August 31, 1946) is an American football coach who is currently head coach for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). Coughlin led the Giants to victory in Super Bowl XLII and Super Bowl XLVI. Coughlin was also the inaugural head coach of the Jacksonville Jaguars, serving from 1995–2002 and leading the team to two AFC Championship Games. Prior to his career in professional football he was head coach of the Boston College Eagles football team from 1991–1993, and served in a variety of coaching and administrative positions in college football. Coughlin was born in Waterloo, New York. He attended Waterloo High School, and was a good student and a letterman in football. While attending Waterloo, he gained the school's single season touchdown record-which still stands at 19. Coughlin attended Syracuse University, where he played halfback for the Syracuse Orange football team. He was teammates with Larry Csonka and Floyd Little. In 1967, he set the school's single-season pass receiving record. Jim Boeheim was his residence advisor (RA) while attending Syracuse. Coughlin was mentored by Bill Parcells while Coughlin was wide receivers coach
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Bill Parcells

    Bill Parcells

    • Current team head coached:
    Duane Charles "Bill" Parcells (born August 22, 1941) is a former American football head coach, most recently with the Dallas Cowboys from 2003 to 2006. He is known as "The Big Tuna", a nickname about the shape of his physique derived from a team joke during his tenure as linebackers coach of the New England Patriots. Parcells won two Super Bowl rings with the New York Giants, defeating the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXI and the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXV. He led the New England Patriots to Super Bowl XXXI, but lost to the Green Bay Packers 35-21. He also led the New York Jets to the 1998 AFC Championship Game. He announced his third retirement from football on January 22, 2007 before returning to the sport later that year as the Vice President of Football Operations with the Miami Dolphins. He resigned from his role as the "football czar" with the Dolphins in September 2010, working as a "consultant" with the team until he took a leave of absence in October 2010, and left the team after the season. He is currently an NFL analyst for ESPN. Parcells was born in Englewood, New Jersey, on August 22, 1941. He grew up in the nearby town of Hasbrouck Heights, His mother, Ida
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Ed Orgeron

    Ed Orgeron

    • Current team head coached:
    Ed Orgeron (born July 27, 1961) is an American football coach who is currently serving as the defensive coordinator/defensive line coach/recruiting coordinator for the USC Trojans. Orgeron previously served as the head football coach of the Ole Miss Rebels from 2005 to 2007. Prior to that, Orgeron was one of the highest paid assistant coaches in college football, with an annual salary of $650,000. Orgeron attended South Lafourche High School in Galliano, Louisiana with former Michigan Panthers, New Orleans Saints, and Atlanta Falcons quarterback Bobby Hebert. Orgeron and Hebert played on the school's Class 4A state championship team in 1977. Orgeron then signed to play college ball at Louisiana State University, but he transferred to Northwestern State University after one practice. He is of Cajun descent. Orgeron returned to the college ranks in 1994 at Nicholls State University before moving to Syracuse University in 1995, where he met his wife Kelly in 1996. Before being hired by Mississippi, he was the defensive line coach and assistant head coach for the University of Southern California (USC) where he played a key role in Pete Carroll's Trojans winning the Rose Bowl and
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Hank Stram

    Hank Stram

    • Current team head coached:
    Henry Louis "Hank" Stram (/ˈstræm/; January 3, 1923 – July 4, 2005) was an American football coach. He is best known for his 15-year tenure with the American Football League's Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs and the Chiefs of the NFL. Stram won three AFL Championships (more than any other coach in the league's history) and Super Bowl IV with the Chiefs. He also coached the most victories (87), had the most post-season appearances (6) and the best post-season record in the AFL (5–1). Stram is largely responsible for the introduction of Gatorade to the NFL due to his close association with Ray Graves, coach at the University of Florida during Gatorade's development and infancy. Hank Stram never had an offensive coordinator, defensive coordinator, or special teams coach during his legendary career with the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs. Stram was born Henry Louis Stram in Chicago in 1923. His Polish-born father, Henry Wilczek, wrestled professionally under the name Stram and the family name was changed accordingly. He later grew up in Gary, Indiana, and graduated from Lew Wallace High School class of 1941.(The football stadium press box was renamed after him in his honor.) He
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Sol Metzger

    Sol Metzger

    • Current team head coached:
    Sol S. Metzger (December 29, 1880 – January 18, 1932) was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, college athletics administrator, and sports journalist. He served as the head football coach at Baylor University (1904), the University of Pennsylvania (1908), Oregon State University (1909), West Virginia University (1914–1915), Washington & Jefferson College (1916–1917), Union College (1919), the University of South Carolina (1920–1924), compiling a career college football of 69–41–8. Metzger was also the head basketball coach at South Carolina for one season in 1920–21, tallying a mark of 7–11. In addition, Metzger wrote a nationally syndicated sports column. Metzger was born in Bedford, Pennsylvania on December 29, 1880. He was of son of American Civil War veteran Captain Sol Metzger and his wife Margaret (Andrews) Metzger. He was one of six children with three brothers and two sisters. Growing up in Bedford he attended Bedford Public Schools and the Bedford Academy before going to Phillips-Andover Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. He graduated from Phillips-Andover Academy in 1899 where he was a member of the track team as a member of the quarter mile
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    David Lee

    David Lee

    • Current team head coached:
    David Lee (born July 2, 1953 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri) is an American football coach. Lee is the current quarterback coach of the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL); he was formerly the offensive coordinator with the Ole Miss for the 2011 season. David Lee attended Vanderbilt University from 1971-1975 where he earned his bachelor degree in History in 1975. As the quarterback for the Commodores, he served as team captain and was named the team’s most valuable player in 1974 with a record of 7-3-2. Lee went on to lead his team to a 6-6 tie against the Texas Tech Red Raiders in the Peach Bowl. David Lee began his coaching career at the University of Tennessee at Martin as the quarterbacks and receivers coach. During his time at the University of Tennessee at Martin, he organized the first Fellowship of Christian Athletes chapter in the school’s history. He then left Tennessee-Martin to return to his alma mater, Vanderbilt University, where he coached as the quarterbacks coach for one season. He then spent the next five season as a quarterbacks coach (1978–1982) with the University of Mississippi. In 1983, he served as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Henry Schulte

    Henry Schulte

    • Current team head coached:
    Henry Frank Schulte (February 4, 1879 – October 18, 1944) was an American football player and coach and also a college track and field coach. Schulte played football at the University of Michigan from 1903–1905 and later coached football and track and field at Eastern Michigan University (1906–1908), University of Missouri (1914–1917), and University of Nebraska (1919–1938). Schulte was often referred to by the nickname "Indian" Schulte, though he was of German rather than Native American descent. Schulte was born in 1879 in St. Louis County, Missouri. His father, Gerhardt Henry Schulte (1846-1917), was a teamster who emigrated to the United States from Germany. His mother, Amalia, also emigrated from Germany. Schulte played football at Smith Academy in St. Louis and then at Washington University in St. Louis. In 1903, Schulte transferred to the University of Michigan where he played at the guard and center positions for Fielding H. Yost's famous "Point-a-Minute" teams of 1903, 1904, and 1905, which compiled a record of 33–1–1 over the three years Schulte was a starter. In late 1905 and early 1906, charges of professionalism were leveled at the major college football programs,
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Howard Jones

    Howard Jones

    • Current team head coached:
    Howard Harding Jones (August 23, 1885 – July 27, 1941) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Syracuse University (1908), Yale University (1909, 1913), Ohio State University (1910), the University of Iowa (1916–1923), Duke University (1924) and the University of Southern California (1925–1940), compiling a career record of 194–64–21. His 1909 Yale team and four of his USC teams (1928, 1931–1932, 1939) won national championships. Jones coached USC in five Rose Bowls, winning all of them. Before coaching, Jones played football at Yale (1905–1907), where he played on three national title-winning teams. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951. Jones was born in Excello, Ohio, now a part of Middletown. He played football for three seasons at Yale University, from 1905 to 1907. During his three years, the Yale Bulldogs never lost a game, going 28–0–2. Yale claims national championships for all three seasons. After graduating in 1908, Jones became the head coach at Syracuse University, leading the Orangemen to a 6–3–1 record before returning to Yale as the head coach. He led Yale to a 10–0 record in 1909, a season in which Yale
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Karl Dorrell

    Karl Dorrell

    • Current team head coached:
    Karl Dorrell (born December 18, 1963) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the quarterbacks coach for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL), a position he assumed in February 2012. Dorrell served as the head football coach of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) from 2003 to 2007, compiling a record of 35–27. He led the UCLA Bruins to five bowl appearance in five seasons, but did not coach in the fifth after he was fired in December 2007. Dorrel was the first African American head football coach in UCLA's history. Karl attended Helix High School in La Mesa, California, where he played football. He was a two-time all-league selection and an honorable mention All-American as a senior. He led Helix to the CIF San Diego Section second place in 1981. Karl went on to play football at UCLA, earning four varsity letters in football. He was one of the most successful wide receivers at UCLA with 1,517 receiving yards on 108 receptions. He suffered a shoulder injury in 1984 and was granted an extra year of eligibility by the NCAA. He played on a team that won the Rose Bowl in 1983, 1984, and 1986, and that won the Freedom Bowl in
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Lee Corso

    Lee Corso

    • Current team head coached:
    Leland "Lee" Corso (born August 7, 1935) is a sports broadcaster and football analyst for ESPN. He has been featured on ESPN's College GameDay program since its inception and he appeared annually as a commentator in EA Sports' NCAA Football through NCAA Football 11. In the off season, Corso serves as Director of Business Development for Dixon Ticonderoga, a Florida based pencil manufacturing company. Corso played college football at Florida State University. He served as the head football coach at the University of Louisville (1969–1972), Indiana University (1973–1982), and Northern Illinois University (1984), compiling a career college football record of 73–85–6. Corso was also the head coach of the United States Football League's Orlando Renegades in 1985. Corso was born in Miami, Florida, and attended Miami Jackson Senior High where he played quarterback. He played college football at Florida State University, where he was a roommate of football player and actor Burt Reynolds and former University of Miami baseball coach Ron Fraser. As a defensive player, he set the school record for most career interceptions (14), a record that stood for more than two decades until it was
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Amos Alonzo Stagg

    Amos Alonzo Stagg

    • Current team head coached:
    Amos Alonzo Stagg (August 16, 1862 – March 17, 1965) was an American athlete and pioneering college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at Springfield College (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35. His Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 have been recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at the University of Chicago (1920–1921), and the head baseball coach there for 19 seasons (1893–1905, 1907–1913). At University of Chicago, Stagg also instituted an annual prep basketball tourney and track meet. Both drew the top high school teams and athletes from around the United States. Stagg played football as an end at Yale University and was selected to the first College Football All-America Team in 1889. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as both a player and a coach in the charter class of 1951 and was the only individual honored in both roles until the 1990s. Influential in other sports, Stagg developed basketball as a five-player sport and was elected
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Chester Brewer

    Chester Brewer

    • Current team head coached:
    Chester Leland Brewer (November 26, 1875 – April 16, 1953) was an American football, basketball, baseball, and track and field coach and athletic director. He served as the head football coach at Albion College (1899–1902), Michigan Agricultural College, now Michigan State University, (1903–1910, 1917, 1919), the University of Missouri (1911–1913), and the University Farm, now the University of California, Davis, (1922), compiling a career record of 97–51–4. Brewer was also the head basketball coach at Michigan Agricultural (1903–1910), Missouri (1910–1911) and the University Farm (1922–1923), tallying a mark of 84–36, and the head baseball coach at Michigan Agricultural (1904–1910, 1918–1920) and Missouri (1911, 1914–1917, 1933–1934), amassing a record of 148–93–4. From 1903 to 1910, and in 1917 and 1919, Brewer coached football at Michigan Agricultural College, where he compiled a 58–23–7 record, making him one of the school's most prolific coaches. From 1911 to 1913, he coached football at the University of Missouri, where he compiled a 14–8–2 record. During his years at the Missouri, Brewer fulfilled many roles. He was hired as athletic director in 1910 and wasted little time
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Greg Schiano

    Greg Schiano

    • Current team head coached: Tampa Bay Buccaneers
    Gregory Edward Schiano (born June 1, 1966) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach of the National Football League's Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a position he assumed in January 2012. Schiano served as the head football coach at Rutgers University from 2001 to 2012. It has been reported that Rutgers is making overtures to re-hire Schiano, whom they love and miss. Schiano was born and grew up in Wyckoff, New Jersey, and attended Ramapo High School. He then attended Bucknell University, where he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, and graduated in 1988 with a B.S. in business administration. In his playing career at Bucknell University, he was a three-year letterman at linebacker. In his junior year, he led his team with 114 tackles and was named to the All-Conference team. In his senior year, he was named team captain, and was named to The Sporting News Pre-season All-American Team. He and his wife Christy have four children: Joey, John, Matt, and Katie. Schiano began his coaching career in 1988 as an assistant coach at Ramapo High School. In 1989, he served as a graduate assistant at Rutgers. In 1990, he took the same position at Penn
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Jason White

    Jason White

    • Current team head coached:
    Jason White (born June 19, 1980) is a former American college football quarterback who played for the University of Oklahoma, was recognized as a unanimous All-American, and won the Heisman Trophy in 2003. White is currently a business owner in Oklahoma. White was raised in Tuttle, Oklahoma. He attended Tuttle High School, and played for the Tuttle Tigers high school football team. His parents owned a cement plant in east Tuttle. White attended the University of Oklahoma, where he played for coach Bob Stoops's Oklahoma Sooners football team from 1999 to 2004. White played in a reserve role his true freshman season, behind Josh Heupel, the Sooners' starting quarterback. He redshirted his sophomore season in 2000; the Sooners went on to win the 2001 Orange Bowl and the BCS National Championship. Nate Hybl beat out White for the starting quarterback job in 2001. Hybl hurt his right side in the first quarter of the Sooners' 14-3 win over No. 5 Texas and did not return. White replaced him and was 16-of-23 for 108 yards and ran 12 times for a team-high 38 yards. He started the next week against Kansas, throwing four touchdown passes to tight end Trent Smith. White continued to start the
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Joe Maddock

    Joe Maddock

    • Current team head coached:
    Joseph Herbert Maddock (July 11, 1877 – November 11, 1943) was a college football player and coach. He was an All-Western tackle for the University of Michigan's "Point-a-Minute" football teams from 1902–1903. He also set a Western Conference record in the hammer throw. He later served as a head football coach at the University of Utah, where he compiled a record of 28–9–1 between 1904 and 1909. Maddock was born in East Jordan, Michigan and began his collegiate career at Albion College. In 1901, the 24-year-old Maddock played for Albion football coach Chester Brewer who taught him the "Wisconsin style of tackle play." Maddock was so effective against the University of Michigan in 1901 that Coach Fielding H. Yost enticed him to transfer to Michigan. He became a star for Yost's "Point-a-Minute" teams in 1902 and 1903. He played tackle and punter at the University of Michigan on Fielding H. Yost's "Point-a-Minute" teams. Though he was a lineman, Maddock was also used as a ball carrier in short-yardage situations. As reported by The New York Times, the Wolverines used "big Joe Maddock, the sturdy right tackle, for first downs when a few yards were needed." In Michigan's 1903 victory
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Rick Neuheisel

    Rick Neuheisel

    • Current team head coached:
    Richard Gerald "Rick" Neuheisel, Jr. ( /ˈnuːhaɪzəl/; German: [ˈnɔʏhaɪzəl]; born February 7, 1961), is a TV football analyst, former American football coach, former player, and attorney. He was most recently the head coach at UCLA, his alma mater, from 2008 to 2011. Prior to UCLA, Neuheisel was the head coach at Colorado from 1995 to 1998 and Washington from 1999 to 2002. From 2005 to 2007, he was an assistant coach with the NFL's Baltimore Ravens, as quarterbacks coach for two seasons and offensive coordinator for one. Before coaching, Neuheisel played quarterback at UCLA from 1980 to 1983, then spent two seasons with the San Antonio Gunslingers of the United States Football League before splitting the 1987 NFL season between the San Diego Chargers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Neuheisel was born in Madison, Wisconsin, one of four children and the only son of Dick and Jane (Jackson) Neuheisel, with sisters Nancy, Katie, and Deborah. Dick is an attorney and Rick grew up in Tempe, Arizona, and graduated from McClintock High School in 1979. He lettered in three sports (football, basketball, baseball) and was named its outstanding athlete during his senior year. Neuheisel played his
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Will Muschamp

    Will Muschamp

    • Current team head coached: Florida Gators football
    William Larry Muschamp (born August 3, 1971) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach at the University of Florida. A native of Georgia, Muschamp attended the University of Georgia and played football for the Bulldogs. Muschamp previously served as the defensive coordinator for the LSU Tigers, Auburn Tigers, and the Texas Longhorns. He also served as the assistant head coach and defensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Muschamp has gained a reputation both for his excellent defenses and his intense, enthusiastic demeanor during games and practice. In his second season at Auburn, Muschamp was a finalist for the 2007 Broyles Award for the most outstanding assistant coach in college football. Prior to accepting the job at Florida, the University of Texas had announced that Muschamp would eventually succeed Mack Brown as head coach of the Longhorns and designated him the "head coach in waiting." Muschamp was born in Rome, Georgia but grew up in Gainesville, Florida. He attended Martha Manson Academy elementary school and Oak Hall High School in Gainesville. His family moved back to Rome, where his father
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Mike Leach

    Mike Leach

    • Current team head coached: Washington State Cougars football
    Michael C. "Mike" Leach (born March 9, 1961) is an American college football coach. He is the head coach of the Washington State Cougars football team. Previously, he was head coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team, leading the Red Raiders to winning seasons in every year of his tenure. Born to Frank and Sandra Leach in Susanville, California, Mike Leach claims Cody, Wyoming, as his hometown. He graduated from Cody High School before studying at Brigham Young University, where he closely followed the exploits of the Brigham Young Cougars. The Cougars, guided by head coach LaVell Edwards and offensive coordinator Norm Chow, played a pass-oriented offense. Leach graduated in 1983 with a bachelor's degree in American Studies. In 1986, Leach earned a Juris Doctor (J.D.) from Pepperdine University School of Law. Leach is also one of the most prominent graduates of the United States Sports Academy, from which he earned a Master's of Sports Science in Sports Coaching in 1988. Leach is married with four children. He was raised a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Leach is atypical among NCAA Division I head football coaches in that he did not play
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Fred Bennion

    Fred Bennion

    • Current team head coached:
    Fred Bennion (September 29, 1884 – January 1960) was a college football coach at Montana State, and Utah. From 1910 to 1913, he coached at Utah, where he compiled a 16–8–3 record. From 1914 to 1917, he coached at Montana State, where he compiled an 11–11–5 record. As a head coach, his overall record stands at 27–15–8. In 1911 and 1912, he went 5–1–1 in each of those two seasons.
    5.60
    5 votes
    81
    Brent Venables

    Brent Venables

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas Brent Venables (born December 18, 1970) is an American college football coach. He is the defensive coordinator at Clemson University. From 1999 to 2011 Venables coached at the University of Oklahoma, where he served as associate head coach, defensive coordinator and linebackers coach for the Sooners under head coach Bob Stoops. Previously he had coached with Stoops at Kansas State and was brought to Oklahoma by Stoops. In 2006, he was one of five finalists for the Broyles Award for the nation's top assistant coach. In January 2012, after it was announced that Mike Stoops would be returning to Oklahoma to resume the defensive coordinator position he had held until 2004, Venables accepted the position of defensive coordinator at Clemson, where his salary was expected to be between $750,000 and $1 million. Venables had been previously reported to be a candidate for the head coaching position at a number of schools including Miami, Kansas, Arkansas, Kansas State, and Clemson. As a player he played at Kansas State under coach Bill Snyder. He would later become an assistant on Bill Snyder's staff at Kansas State. He is also a strong advocate in support for Haitian babies. While
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Dick Tomey

    Dick Tomey

    • Current team head coached:
    Dick Tomey (born June 20, 1938) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the special teams coach at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, a position he assumed in February 2011. Tomey has served as the head football coach at Hawaii (1977–1986), the University of Arizona (1987–2000), and San Jose State University (2005–2009), compiling a career college football record of 183–145–7. The DePauw University graduate and Phi Kappa Psi member held assistant coaching positions at Miami University, Northern Illinois University, Davidson College, the University of Kansas, and UCLA. From 1977 to 1986, he led his teams at Hawaii to their first in season top-20 Associated Press ranking in 1981, and their first AP first-team All-American player, Al Noga. In 1981, Tomey also earned Western Athletic Conference "Coach of the Year" honors. He left as the winningest coach in Hawaii history, but has since been passed by June Jones. In 1987, he became head coach at Arizona, earning Pac 10 "Coach of the Year" honors in 1992. During his tenure, he coached five future NFL first-round draft choices, 20 All-Americans, and 43 Pac-10 first team players. His best teams were in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    George W. Woodruff

    George W. Woodruff

    • Current team head coached:
    George Waldo Woodruff (August 27, 1895 - February 4, 1987 in Atlanta, Georgia) was an engineer, businessman, and philanthropist in Atlanta, Georgia. He attended the Georgia School of Technology in 1917 and gave generously to both his alma mater and Emory University, including (in coordination with his brother Robert W. Woodruff) the single largest donation ever to a school, $105 million to Emory University in 1979. Woodruff went to high school at Tech High School (now Henry W. Grady High School) and attended Georgia Tech's School of Mechanical Engineering and later the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but left school in 1917 due to World War I. At Georgia Tech, he was a brother of the Kappa Alpha Order. From 1936 to 1985 (49 years), Woodruff was the director of the Coca-Cola Company, although he was never an officer of the company. He also headed the Continental Gin Company from 1930 to 1985, which was a cotton-processing business. George was the last living child of Ernest Woodruff, the magnate that led the Trust Company (now known as SunTrust) and who orchestrated the takeover of the Coca-Cola Company. In 1984, Forbes Magazine estimated that Woodruff was worth $200 million
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Bob Weber

    Bob Weber

    • Current team head coached:
    Robert Weber (April 21, 1934 – November 1, 2008) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Arizona from 1969 to 1972 and at the University of Louisville from 1980 to 1984, compiling a career college football record of 36–61. Weber grew up on a farm near Fort Collins, Colorado and played center at Colorado State University from 1951 to 1954, earning all-Skyline Conference honors his final two years. After college he played in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos for a year before a water skiing injury ended his playing career. Weber began his coaching career at Trinidad State Junior College before becoming an assistant coach at Colorado State University. Following his time at the University of Louisville, Weber served as an assistant coach at Southern Methodist University and Vanderbilt University before retiring in the mid-1990s. Weber died of pancreatic cancer on November 1, 2008.
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Dennis Erickson

    Dennis Erickson

    • Current team head coached:
    Dennis Erickson (born March 24, 1947) is a former American football coach, most recently the head coach at Arizona State University from 2007 to 2011. Previously, Erickson was the head coach at the University of Idaho (1982–1985, 2006), the University of Wyoming (1986), Washington State University (1987–1988), the University of Miami (1989–1994), and Oregon State University (1999–2002). Erickson also was the head coach of two teams in the NFL, the Seattle Seahawks (1995–1998) and the San Francisco 49ers (2003–2004), where he tallied a mark of 40–56. During his career at Miami, Erickson's team won two national championships, in 1989 and 1991. Erickson was raised in Ferndale, Washington, 100 miles (160 km) north of Seattle, and in Everett, 25 miles (40 km) north of Seattle. His father, Robert "Pink" Erickson, was the head football coach at Ferndale High School before becoming the head coach at Cascade High School in Everett. The younger Erickson played quarterback at the rival Everett High, coached by next-door neighbor, Bill Dunn. This "made for some quiet dinners on game day." As a junior, Dennis was the starting quarterback, beating out the former starter, senior Mike Price,
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Glenn Scobey Warner

    Glenn Scobey Warner

    • Current team head coached:
    Glenn Scobey Warner (April 5, 1871 – September 7, 1954), most commonly known as Pop Warner, was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at the University of Georgia (1895–1896), Cornell University (1897–1898, 1904–1906), the Carlisle Indian Industrial School (1899–1903, 1907–1914), the University of Pittsburgh (1915–1923), Stanford University (1924–1932), and Temple University (1933–1938), compiling a career college football record of 319–106–32. Warner coached four teams to national championships: in 1915, 1916, and 1918 with Pittsburgh and in 1926 with Stanford. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Warner also helped start the popular youth American football organization, Pop Warner Little Scholars. Warner was born in Springville, New York. He attended and played football for Cornell University. As captain of the Cornell football team, Warner obtained the nickname "Pop" because he was older than most of his teammates. After graduating from Cornell, he had a brief legal career in New York. Warner married Lorraine Tibb, 1888 graduate of Ten Broeck Academy in theTown of Franklinville. In 1902, Warner played pro
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Kirk Ferentz

    Kirk Ferentz

    • Current team head coached: Iowa Hawkeyes football
    Kirk James Ferentz (born August 1, 1955) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Iowa, a position he has held since 1999. From 1990 to 1992, Ferentz was the head football coach at the University of Maine. He has also served as an assistant coach with the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens of the NFL. Ferentz played college football as a linebacker at the University of Connecticut from 1974 to 1976. After playing football at Upper St. Clair High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Ferentz played linebacker for the University of Connecticut. He was a football captain and an academic all-Yankee Conference linebacker at Connecticut. He served as a student assistant at Connecticut in 1977 and graduated in 1978. Ferentz spent his next two seasons as defensive coordinator at Worcester Academy, where he taught English literature. He then spent one season in 1980 as an assistant offensive line coach at the University of Pittsburgh. That Panther team, coached by Jackie Sherrill, finished with an 11–1 record and a number two national ranking. Ferentz was the offensive line coach at the University of Iowa under Hall of
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Todd Dodge

    Todd Dodge

    • Current team head coached:
    Todd Dodge (born July 21, 1963) is an American football coach at Marble Falls High School. After graduating from the University of Texas at Austin, where he played quarterback for the football team, Dodge began coaching at the high school level, eventually becoming the head football coach at Southlake Carroll High School, where his teams won four 5A state titles in a seven year span. In 2006, Dodge was hired to lead the University of North Texas football team, but he was released in 2010 after acquiring a 6–37 record as head coach. After coaching the quarterbacks at the University of Pittsburgh for the 2011 season, he returned to high school coaching in Marble Falls in January 2012. Dodge played quarterback at Thomas Jefferson High School in Port Arthur, Texas, under coach Ronnie Thompson. As a senior in 1980, Dodge became the first quarterback in Texas high school football history to pass for more than 3,000 yards in a season, while he led Jefferson High to the 1980 Class 5A state championship game against Permian High School of Odessa, Texas. Dodge went on to play quarterback at the University of Texas at Austin under coach Fred Akers. He still ranks ninth on the UT all-time
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Frank Solich

    Frank Solich

    • Current team head coached:
    Frank Solich (born September 8, 1944) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach at Ohio University, a position he has held since the 2005 season. From 1998 to 2003, Solich served as the head coach at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, where he also played fullback under Bob Devaney in the mid-1960s. Solich grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, and graduated from Holy Name High School in 1962, where he earned all-state, All-America, and all-scholastic honors. He was a part of Bob Devaney’s first recruiting class at Nebraska, and became a standout for the Huskers in the mid-1960s, where he earned the nickname "Fearless Frankie". An All-Big Eight fullback and co-captain of the Huskers’ 1965 team, his playing career earned him induction into the Nebraska Football Hall of Fame in 1992. In NU's 27–17 win over Air Force in 1965, he ran for 204 yards on 17 carries, becoming the first Husker to run for 200 yards in a game, and subsequently the first Husker to be featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated. He began his career in the Nebraska prep ranks, as head coach at Holy Name High School , Omaha, Nebraska in 1966 and 1967. His 1967 team was state runner-up.
    6.25
    4 votes
    90
    Johnny Majors

    Johnny Majors

    • Current team head coached:
    Johnny Majors (born May 21, 1935) is a former American football player and coach. A standout halfback at the University of Tennessee, he was an All-American in 1956 and a two-time winner of the Southeastern Conference Most Valuable Player award, in 1955 and 1956. He finished second to Paul Hornung in voting for the Heisman Trophy in 1956. Majors served as the head football coach at Iowa State University (1968–1972), the University of Pittsburgh (1973–1976, 1993–1996), and Tennessee (1977–1992), compiling a career college football record of 185–137–10. His 1976 Pittsburgh squad won a national championship after capping a 12–0 season with a victory in the Sugar Bowl. Majors was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1987. Majors played high school football for the Huntland Hornets of Franklin County, Tennessee. They won the state championship in 1951. Majors' father, Shirley Majors, was the head coach at Huntland from 1949 to 1957 and then head coach at The University of the South, Sewanee, from 1957 to 1977. Majors also played alongside his brother, Joe, at Huntland. Another brother, Bobby, also played at Tennessee and professionally for the Cleveland Browns.
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    William Heffelfinger

    William Heffelfinger

    • Current team head coached:
    William "Pudge" Walter Heffelfinger (December 20, 1867 – April 2, 1954) was an American football player and coach. He is considered the first person to play football professionally. Heffelfinger, a three-time All-American, played for Walter Camp at Yale University in 1889, 1890, and 1891. He then played amateur football for the Chicago Athletic Association (for which he was compensated with "double expenses," as was a common practice at the time). In the 1960s a man known only as "Nelson Ross", walked into the office of Art Rooney, the president of the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League. After a brief discussion, the man gave Rooney a typed, 49-page manuscript about the early history of pro football. Ross' examination of Pittsburgh newspapers indicated that the first pro football player actually was Pudge Heffelfinger, an all-American guard from Yale, who was hired to play for Allegheny on November 12, 1892 for $500. Up until then John Brallier, of the Latrobe Athletic Association, was considered the first professional football player. The Pro Football Hall of Fame soon discovered a page torn from an 1892 account ledger prepared by Allegheny manager, O. D.
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Dom Capers

    Dom Capers

    • Current team head coached:
    Ernest Dominic "Dom" Capers (born August 7, 1950) is an American football coach. He is the current defensive coordinator of the Green Bay Packers, and the only man to serve two different National Football League expansion teams as their inaugural head coach. After playing high school football for the Meadowbrook Colts in Byesville, Ohio Capers attended Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio where he played linebacker and defensive tackle. He is a brother of the Alpha Nu chapter of Alpha Tau Omega. He began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Kent State University and the University of Washington. Later he was an assistant coach at Hawaii, San Jose State, California, Tennessee and Ohio State. After a stint in the USFL, he began his NFL career as an assistant with the New Orleans Saints and was named defensive coordinator of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1992, including a trip to the AFC Championship game in 1994. He remained with the Steelers until becoming head coach of the expansion Carolina Panthers in 1995. After 1995's 7–9 season, a record breaking mark for an expansion team, the Panthers went to the NFC Championship game in 1996. Continuing to spend against the salary
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Frank J. O'Neill

    Frank J. O'Neill

    • Current team head coached:
    Frank J. "Buck" O'Neill (March 6, 1875 – April 21, 1958) was an American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at Colgate University (1902, 1904–1905), Syracuse University (1906–1907, 1913–1915, 1917–1919), and Columbia University (1920–1922), compiling a career college football coaching record of 81–41–8. O’Neill was a two-sport athlete at Williams College where he played football and ran track. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. O'Neill was a two-sport athlete at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He lettered in football in 1899, 1900, and 1901 and served as captain his senior year under coach J. J. Hazen. The team he captained had an overall record of 6–4 with losses to Harvard, Dartmouth, Columbia, and Army. Even with those losses, O'Neill led team did go on to win the 1901 Tricollegiante Football Association championship with victories over league rivals Wesleyan and Amherst. O'Neill also lettered three times in track where he ran the 440. As in football, he captained the track team his senior year. He placed third in the 440 at the 1901 New England Intercollegiate Athletic Association annual
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Greg McMackin

    Greg McMackin

    • Current team head coached:
    Greg McMackin (born April 24, 1945) is a retired American football coach and former player. He served as the head football coach at Oregon Institute of Technology from 1986 to 1989 and at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa from 2008 to 2011, compiling a career college football record of 53–39–1. Before coming to Hawaii as defensive coordinator in 2007, he previously served in the same capacity for the Seattle Seahawks, the Miami Hurricanes, and the Texas Tech Red Raiders. McMackin has coached extensively at both the collegiate and professional levels. At the professional level, McMackin has coached for two National Football League teams: as defensive coordinator for the Seattle Seahawks from 1995 to 1998, and as linebackers and assistant head coach for the San Francisco 49ers from 2003 to 2005. He also coached for the Denver Gold of the defunct United States Football League (USFL). At the college level, McMackin gained prominence as the defense coordinator for the University of Miami for the 1993 and 1994 seasons. There, Miami won two Big East Championships and ranked first in total defense, scoring defense and pass defense. Further, the Hurricanes allowed just seven touchdowns on
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Henry L. Williams

    Henry L. Williams

    • Current team head coached:
    Dr. Henry Lane Williams (July 26, 1869 – June 14, 1931) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the United States Military Academy in 1891 and the University of Minnesota from 1900 to 1921, compiling a career college football record of 141–34–12. Williams's Minnesota Golden Gophers teams won eight Big Ten Conference titles and his 136 wins are the most of any coach in team history. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. After playing football at Yale University, Williams began his coaching career at the United States Military Academy in 1891 while he was a teacher at Siglar Academy in Newburgh, New York. He then moved to Philadelphia where he enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine while he coached football and track at William Penn Charter School. In 1900, Williams was hired as the head football coach at the University of Minnesota. His Minnesota Golden Gophers were Big Ten Conference champions eight times (1900, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1915). Williams had a 136–33–11 record at Minnesota. His winning percentage (.786) is the highest of any Gopher football coach to date
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Jeff Tedford

    Jeff Tedford

    • Current team head coached: California Golden Bears football
    Jeff Tedford (born November 2, 1961) is an American football coach and the current head coach of the California Golden Bears football team, a position he has held since 2002. As a first-time head coach, Tedford has won wide acclaim for revitalizing the Cal football program. Tedford currently has the most career victories of any Cal head coach, which was accomplished during the 2011 season. He is the highest paid state employee of California as of 2011. Tedford was born in Lynwood, California the youngest of five children to Joe and Betty Tedford. Tedford's parents divorced before he turned 10. His brother Dennis, 10 years his senior, helped raise Tedford, taking him on camping trips and driving him to football practice and games. Tedford attended Warren High School in Downey, California, where he was a letterman in football, playing quarterback and earning an All-League selection. Tedford graduated from Warren High School in 1979. After high school, Tedford enrolled at Cerritos College, becoming the first member of his family to attend college. He spent two years playing quarterback at Cerritos followed by two years at Fresno State, where he established several passing records,
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Josh Cody

    Josh Cody

    • Current team head coached:
    Joshua C. Cody (June 11, 1892 – June 17, 1961) was an American college athlete, head coach and athletics director. Cody was a native of Tennessee and an alumnus of Vanderbilt University, where he was a three-time All-American college football player. After graduation from Vanderbilt, Cody coached college football, basketball and baseball and served as the athletics director at various universities, including Clemson University, Vanderbilt, the University of Florida and Temple University. Josh Cody was born and raised in Franklin, Tennessee, where he attended Battle Ground Academy. In 1914, at the age of 22, he enrolled at Vanderbilt University and played football for legendary coach Dan McGugin. At 6 foot, 4 inches, and 225 pounds, Cody played offensive and defensive tackle, but was versatile enough to play quarterback, running back and place-kicker at times. He was known as a sure tackler and fierce blocker who helped the Commodores score 1,099 points in thirty-five games (31.4 points per game). Vanderbilt was 23–9–1 in his four seasons, including 21–3–3 in his final three years. He was also a member of the basketball, baseball and track and field teams at Vanderbilt, earning
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Major Applewhite

    Major Applewhite

    • Current team head coached: Texas Longhorns football
    Major Lee Applewhite (born July 26, 1978) is the Co-Offensive Coordinator and Running Backs Coach for the University of Texas. Prior to Texas, Applewhite served as offensive coordinator at Rice University under Todd Graham in 2006, and at the University of Alabama under Nick Saban in 2007. He was the youngest offensive coordinator among Division I-A schools at that time. Applewhite was previously the quarterbacks coach at Syracuse University in 2005. Prior to coaching, he was a college football quarterback for the Texas Longhorns from 1998 to 2001 and set 8 school records. Many of these still stand, including the longest pass play (97 yards), consecutive passes without an interception (156) and most yards passing in a game (473). He previously held the record for career yards (8,353). Applewhite was a quarterback for the Texas Longhorns from 1998 to 2001. Recruited from Catholic High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana by then Texas coach John Mackovic, he was later coached by Mack Brown. While at Texas, the undersized Applewhite's tenure was noted both for his often gritty heroics as well as his battle for playing time with the heralded blue chip recruit Chris Simms, son of New York
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Chan Gailey

    Chan Gailey

    • Current team head coached: Buffalo Bills
    Thomas Chandler Gailey, Jr. (born January 5, 1952) is an American professional and college football coach. Gailey is the current head coach of the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL); he was formerly the head coach of the NFL's Dallas Cowboys and the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets college football team. Gailey previously served as offensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins in 2000–01 when the Dolphins posted consecutive 11–5 records. He was on the Pittsburgh Steelers staff from 1994-97 when the Steelers won four straight AFC Central titles and coached in one Super Bowl (XXX). He was offensive coordinator in 1997 when Pittsburgh ranked sixth in the NFL in total offense and seventh in scoring. Gailey served as the offensive coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs in 2008 and three games of the 2009 pre-season before he was relieved of duties by Chiefs head coach Todd Haley. Gailey was born in Gainesville, Georgia in 1952. He attended Americus High School in Americus, Georgia, where he was an Eagle Scout, and a letterman in high school football, basketball, baseball and golf. In football, he was an all-state selection as quarterback. Gailey graduated from Americus High
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Jerry Glanville

    Jerry Glanville

    • Current team head coached: Hartford Colonials
    Jerry Glanville (born October 14, 1941) is a former American football player and coach, former NASCAR driver and owner, and sportscaster in the United States. He served as Head Football Coach of the Houston Oilers from 1986 to 1990 and the Atlanta Falcons from 1990 to 1994, compiling a career NFL record of 63–73. From 2007 to 2009, he was the Head Football Coach at Portland State University, tallying a mark of 9–24. Glanville has worked as an analyst on HBO's Inside the NFL, CBS's The NFL Today/NFL on CBS and Fox's coverage of the NFL. He has also raced on the Automobile Racing Club of America circuit. Glanville also briefly served as a consultant and liaison for the United Football League in 2011. Glanville played college football as a middle linebacker at Northern Michigan University where he graduated in 1964 with a bachelors degree. He also holds a masters degree from Western Kentucky University where he worked as an assistant football coach on campus and was roommates with a former NFL coach, Joe Bugel. The two were known for drawing football plays on pizza boxes. During Glanville's time in the National Football League he was the special teams/defensive assistant for the
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Ken Niumatalolo

    Ken Niumatalolo

    • Current team head coached:
    Ken Niumatalolo (born May 8, 1965) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the United States Naval Academy, a position he has held since the 2007 season. Niumatalolo played college football at the University of Hawaiʻi. As a quarterback he led the then-Rainbows to their first postseason bowl game in 1989. Niumatalolo is the second person of Polynesian descent to be named head coach of a NCAA Division I FBS college football program and the first Samoan collegiate head coach on any level. He is also a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as Mormons. Niumatalolo was a star in both football and basketball at Radford High School in Honolulu, graduating in 1983. He went on to play at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, eventually becoming the Rainbows (now the Warriors) starting quarterback after serving a two-year religious mission to the Spanish speaking people of the Ventura California area. During his time with the Rainbows, he ran an option-oriented offense under the direction of Paul Johnson, who was then the offensive coordinator. Niumatalolo stayed on at Hawaii after his graduation, taking a
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    Mike Sherman

    Mike Sherman

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael Francis Sherman (born December 19, 1954) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the offensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL), a position he assumed in January 2012. Sherman has previously been the head football coach at Texas A&M University from 2008 to 2011. Prior to coaching the Aggies, he served as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers from the 2000 to 2005. Sherman led the Packers to five consecutive winning seasons from 2000–04 and three divisional titles in 2002, 2003, and 2004. Before he started coaching in the NFL, he served as an assistant coach at five different colleges, including Texas A&M, where he coached the offensive line for seven seasons. Sherman was born in 1954 in Norwood, Massachusetts. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, Sherman spent his life in Hyde Park, Massachusetts, the southernmost neighborhood in Boston. He lived there with his parents, Claire and Frank Sherman, his two sisters, Sandra and Cynthia, and his two brothers, George and Frank. His extended family members, who lived nearby, were devout Green Bay Packers fans and now follow the Aggies regularly. Sherman was also raised in
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Benny Friedman

    Benny Friedman

    • Current team head coached:
    Benjamin "Benny" Friedman (March 18, 1905 – November 24, 1982) was an American football quarterback who played for the University of Michigan (1924–1926), Cleveland Bulldogs (1927), Detroit Wolverines (1928), New York Giants (1929–1931), and Brooklyn Dodgers (1932–1934). He is generally considered the first great passer in professional football. In 1926, Friedman earned the Chicago Tribune Silver Football Award as the Big Ten MVP. In 2005, Friedman was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Friedman became the starting quarterback and placekicker midway through his sophomore year at Michigan (On defense, he played in the backfield). In 1925 and 1926, he led the Wolverines to consecutive 7–1 seasons and first place finishes in the Big Ten Conference. Against Indiana in 1925, Friedman accounted for 44 points, throwing for five touchdowns and kicking two field goals and eight extra points. The following year, he was a consensus first-team All-American and most valuable player of the Big Ten. In 1927, Friedman joined his hometown Cleveland Bulldogs in the National Football League. After a successful rookie season in Cleveland, he had a spectacular second year playing for the
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Bret Bielema

    Bret Bielema

    • Current team head coached: Arkansas Razorbacks football
    Bret Bielema ( /ˈbiːləmɑː/; born January 13, 1970) is an American college football coach and current head coach of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Badgers football team. Bielema has held the position since 2006, achieving a 60–19 record through the conclusion of the 2011 season. Bielema's 2011 salary of $2.5 million made him the 17th highest paid coach in the Football Bowl Subdivision. In January 2012, after leading the Badgers to their first back-to-back Rose Bowls in twelve years, Bielema's contract was extended until January 31, 2017. Bielema played college football as a defensive lineman at the University of Iowa under legendary coach Hayden Fry from 1989 to 1992, serving as team captain his senior season. After receiving a scholarship his sophomore year, he got a tattoo of Iowa's Tiger Hawk logo on his left calf, which he still has today. Bielema graduated from Iowa with a bachelor's degree in marketing. He went on to play for the Milwaukee Mustangs, a team in the Arena Football League. Bielema then returned to the University of Iowa, serving as an assistant coach from 1993 to 2001. He then became the co-defensive coordinator for Kansas State University from 2002 to 2003.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Dante Scarnecchia

    Dante Scarnecchia

    • Current team head coached:
    Dante Scarnecchia (born February 14, 1948) is the American football offensive line coach and assistant head coach for the New England Patriots of the National Football League. Scarnecchia has spent the majority of his professional coaching career with the Patriots, joining them in 1982 and only leaving in 1989 to coach with the Indianapolis Colts, before returning to the Patriots two years later. Scarnecchia attended Taft Junior College before transferring to California Western University in 1966, where he played football as an offensive lineman and earned a degree in physical education, while also serving as a sergeant in the United States Marine Corps Reserve. Scarnecchia began his coaching career in 1970 with his alma mater California Western University as their offensive line coach, a position he held through 1972. From 1973 to 1974, Scarnecchia was the assistant offensive line and assistant defensive backfield coach for Iowa State University. In 1975, he began a two-year stint with Southern Methodist University, first as a graduate assistant before being promoted to offensive line coach upon the hiring of head coach Ron Meyer in 1976. From 1977 through 1978, Scarnecchia served
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Dell Morgan

    Dell Morgan

    • Current team head coached:
    John O'Dell Morgan (c. 1902 – March 3, 1962) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Texas Tech University from 1941 to 1950, compiling a record of 55–49–3. Morgan was also the head basketball coach at Texas Tech from 1931 to 1934, tallying a mark of 42–29. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Auburn University from 1934 to 1939 and at Rice University from 1953 to 1961, amassing a career college baseball coaching record of 146–143–2. Morgan was the head coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders basketball from 1931 to 1934. During the same time, Morgan also served as an assistant coach to the football team. His record during that time was 42–29. Morgan was later the head coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team from 1941 to 1950. During his tenure, he compiled a 55–49–3 record. In four of his last five seasons, he posted a winning record. His best season came in 1941, when his team went 9–2. Morgan was killed in car accident near Bay City, Texas on March 3, 1962.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Gary Pinkel

    Gary Pinkel

    • Current team head coached: Missouri Tigers football
    Gary Robin Pinkel (born April 27, 1952) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Missouri, a position he has held since the 2001 season. From 1991 to 2000, Pinkel coached at the University of Toledo, where his team won a Mid-American Conference championship in 1995. Before becoming a head coach, he was an assistant at the University of Washington, where he served as Don James's offensive coordinator. Pinkel graduated from Kenmore High School in Akron, Ohio, and received his bachelor of science degree in education from Kent State University in 1973, where he played tight end under James. Pinkel and Alabama Head Coach Nick Saban were college teammates. Pinkel took over the head coaching job at Toledo in 1991 when Saban left to to become defensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns. His roommate at Kent was Pittsburgh Steelers great Jack Lambert. He did post-graduate studies at Kent and Bowling Green State University. He was inducted into the Kent Athletic Hall of Fame in 1997. Since arriving at Missouri in November 2000, Pinkel has guided the Tigers to eight bowl games in 11 years, winning four. The first was in
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Hank Ketcham

    Hank Ketcham

    • Current team head coached:
    Henry Holman "Hank" Ketcham (June 17, 1891 – November 1986) was an American football player. He played the center and guard positions for Yale University. He was selected as a first-team All-American three consecutive years in 1911, 1912 and 1913. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1968. Ketcham was born in Englewood, New Jersey. After attending the Hotchkiss School, he enrolled at Yale University, where he was a member of Skull and Bones. He played every game for Yale's varsity football team in 1911, 1912, and 1913. He helped lead Yale to a 7-2-1 record in 1911 and a 7-1-1 record in 1912 and was a consensus All-American in both of those years. In 1913, Ketcham was selected as the captain of Yale's football team. In a departure from past tradition at Yale, Ketcham appointed Howard Jones as the school's first salaried football coach. Ketcham later recalled: "I played every varsity game for three years and was taken out only once for a slight injury ... I am generally credited with having developed the term 'roving center'. Except for today's platoon systems, football hasn't changed materially. We had the on-side kick, the ball was a bit larger in circumference
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Ivan Fears

    Ivan Fears

    • Current team head coached:
    Ivan Fears (born November 15, 1954 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is the current American football running backs coach for the New England Patriots of the National Football League. Fears attended John Yeates High School in Suffolk, Virginia, and was a letterman in football. In football, he was twice named the school's "Outstanding Player of the Year", and as a senior, was also an All-State selection. Fears attended The College of William & Mary, where he played football as a running back from 1973 to 1975. Fears began his coaching career in 1976 with his alma mater, William & Mary as a graduate assistant and in 1977 was the team's wide receivers coach. From 1978 to 1979 he served as the team's quarterbacks coach before moving to Syracuse University in 1980 in the same capacity. Fears joined the Patriots' coaching staff in 1991. He spent two seasons with the Patriots before moving on to coach the Chicago Bears' wide receivers starting in 1993, but rejoined New England in 1999 as their wide receivers coach. In 2002, he was re-assigned to running backs coach.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Lovie Smith

    Lovie Smith

    • Current team head coached:
    Lovie Lee Smith (born (1958-05-08)May 8, 1958) is the head coach of the Chicago Bears professional football team of the NFL. Smith has been to the Super Bowl twice, as the defensive coordinator for the 2001 St. Louis Rams and as the head coach for the Chicago Bears in 2006. Lovie Smith was born in Gladewater and raised in Big Sandy, Texas. He was named after his great aunt, Lavana. During Smith's high school career in Big Sandy, he earned all-state honors for three years as a defensive end and linebacker. His team won three consecutive state championships in 1973–75, including a 0–0 tie in 1974 versus Celina High School of legendary coach G. A. Moore. In 1975, Big Sandy had one of the most dominant seasons in high school football history, as the defense allowed only 15 points (11 shutouts) all season, while the offense, featuring eventual Miami Dolphins running back David Overstreet, scored a then-national record 824 points. Smith played college football at University of Tulsa under head coach John Cooper. He was a two-time All-American at linebacker and safety. After graduation he immediately pursued a coaching career. He was hired as defensive coordinator at his hometown high
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Mike Nolan

    Mike Nolan

    • Current team head coached:
    Mike Nolan (born March 7, 1959 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American football coach and the current defensive coordinator of the Atlanta Falcons. He was formerly head coach for the San Francisco 49ers and a defensive coordinator for the Baltimore Ravens, New York Jets, Washington Redskins, New York Giants, Denver Broncos and Miami Dolphins. Nolan attended the University of Oregon and was a three-year letterman in football and starter at safety. He has coached at the collegiate level at Stanford University, Rice University, and LSU before moving on to the National Football League. The son of former San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints head coach, Dick Nolan, he signed with the 49ers in 2005 to be head coach, following in his father's footsteps. Nolan joined San Francisco after establishing himself as the defensive coordinator of the Baltimore Ravens, a position he held with three other teams: New York Jets (2000), Washington Redskins (1997–99), and New York Giants (1993–96). Nolan and the 49ers selected Alex Smith with the first overall pick in the 2005 NFL Draft. Nolan thought Smith to be cerebral, introspective, and non-confrontational. Nolan also evaluated Aaron Rodgers
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Ron Zook

    Ron Zook

    • Current team head coached:
    Ron Zook (born April 28, 1954) is a former American football coach and player. He served as the head football coach at the University of Florida from 2002 to 2004 and the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 2005 to 2011. Zook is a native of Ohio and an alumnus of Miami University, where he played college football. He has worked as an assistant coach in the National Football League (NFL) with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1996–1998), Kansas City Chiefs (1999), and New Orleans Saints (2000–2001). In August 2012 it was announced that he has been hired as a college football studio analyst by CBS Sports. Zook was born in Loudonville, Ohio in 1954. He played college football as a defensive back for Miami University, and graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1976. Zook immediately began coaching football, beginning at Orrville High School in Orrville, Ohio in 1976. In 1978, Zook began coaching college football at Murray State University. Through the 1980s, Zook held coaching positions with a number of college football teams, including Cincinnati, Kansas, Tennessee, Virginia Tech, and Ohio State. Beginning in 1991, Zook served as defensive coordinator for three seasons at the
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Russ Grimm

    Russ Grimm

    • Current team head coached:
    Russell Scott Grimm (born May 2, 1959 in Scottdale, Pennsylvania) is a former American football guard for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League. As a collegian, he was an All-American center at the University of Pittsburgh. As a professional, Grimm had multi-selections to both the All-Pro and Pro Bowl teams, and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010. Grimm played 11 seasons for the Redskins and was a first team selection to the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team. He is currently the assistant head coach and offensive line coach for the Arizona Cardinals. Grimm is featured in the video game All-Pro Football 2K8. He was drafted in the third round by the Redskins in the 1981 NFL Draft. Upon hearing that he had been drafted by the Redskins, Grimm thought to himself, I'm going to Seattle, not realizing that the Redskins played in the nation's capital. Along with Jeff Bostic, Mark May, George Starke and Joe Jacoby, Russ Grimm was a founding member of the Redskins' renowned "Hogs" offensive line of the 1980s and early 1990s (deemed one of the best front fives of NFL history), which was a mainstay of the Redskins' glory years during the first Joe Gibbs
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    John Madden

    John Madden

    • Current team head coached:
    John Earl Madden (born April 10, 1936) is a former American professional football player in the National Football League, a former Super Bowl-winning head coach with the Oakland Raiders in the American Football League and later the NFL, and a former color commentator for NFL telecasts. In 2006, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in recognition of his coaching career. He is also widely known for the long-running Madden NFL video game series he has endorsed and fronted since 1988. Madden broadcast with Pat Summerall in the 1980s and 1990s, on CBS and later Fox. He was also the last color commentator for ABC's Monday Night Football before it moved to ESPN in 2006. His last regular role was as a commentator for NBC Sunday Night Football. Madden has also written several books and has served as a commercial pitchman for various products and retailers. He retired from broadcasting on April 16, 2009 in order to spend more time with his family. John Madden was born in Austin, Minnesota, to Earl Russell Madden and Mary Margaret (Flaherty) Madden. His father, an auto mechanic, moved the Madden family to Daly City, California, a suburb of San Francisco, when he was young. He
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Steve Mariucci

    Steve Mariucci

    • Current team head coached:
    Stephen Ray "Steve" Mariucci (born November 4, 1955) is a former National Football League coach. He coached for the San Francisco 49ers and most recently for the Detroit Lions. Mariucci was born and raised in Iron Mountain, Michigan, and was a three-time All-America (Division II) quarterback at Northern Michigan University (NMU) in Marquette. In 1975, he quarterbacked NMU to the NCAA Division II National Football Championship. He then went on to play 2 weeks with the Hamilton Tigercats in the Canadian Football League. He began his coaching career at his alma mater (1978–79), and moved to Cal State Fullerton (1980–82) and Louisville (1983–84). Mariucci's first pro position was as a receivers coach for the USFL's Orlando Renegades in 1985. Later that fall, he had a brief stint with the Los Angeles Rams as quality control coach. He joined the USC staff in 1986 and then moved to the coaching staff at California in 1987. In 1990–91, he served as the Golden Bears' Offensive Coordinator before being appointed as QB coach for the Green Bay Packers. After four years as quarterback coach for the Green Bay Packers, Mariucci returned to Cal as Head Coach in 1996 where the team finished 6–6,
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Dennis Franchione

    Dennis Franchione

    • Current team head coached:
    Dennis Wayne Franchione (born March 28, 1951), also known as Coach Fran, is an American football coach. He is currently the head football coach at Texas State University, a position he held from 1990 to 1991, when the school was known as Southwest Texas State University, and resumed in 2011. Franchione has also served as the head football coach at Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas (1981–1982), Pittsburg State University (1985–1989), the University of New Mexico (1992–1997), Texas Christian University (1998–2000), the University of Alabama (2001–2002), and Texas A&M University (2003–2007). In his 25 seasons as a head coach in college football, Franchione has won eight conference championships and one divisional crown. Franchione was born in Girard, Kansas. He received his bachelor of arts in 1973 from Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas. Franchione and his wife, the former Kim Kraus, began dating after he took her on a tour of his alma mater, Pittsburg State, at the request of her father. They married shortly after, in 1977, while living in Peabody, Kansas. The couple have two daughters, Elizabeth Ann and Ashley Renee. Brad Franchione, his son from a previous
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    J.G. Bannon

    J.G. Bannon

    • Current team head coached:
    Joseph George Bannon (May 1, 1874 – January 19, 1937) was an American college football coach. He served as the head coach at the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1894. Bannon was born in Maryland on May 1, 1874. His great-grandfather was an officer in the rebellious Irish army during the Rebellion of 1798. His father, Michael Bannon, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland in 1827 and emigrated to the United States, where he arrived in Baltimore in 1847 with only ten cents. He worked as a teacher and eventually received an education in law and established a real estate business. Michael Bannon entered politics in Anne Arundel County and served as a Maryland State Senator. His brother, James P. Bannon, was a prominent Anne Arundel County politician and lawyer. Bannon attended the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland), where he played on the football team as an end from 1892 to 1894. Bannon served as the head coach during the 1894 season and amassed a 4–3 record. He graduated from Maryland with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1895. Bannon died in Jessup, Maryland on January 19, 1937.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Kyle Whittingham

    Kyle Whittingham

    • Current team head coached: Utah Utes football
    Kyle Whittingham (born November 21, 1959) is the head football coach of the University of Utah Utes. Prior to becoming the head coach at Utah, Whittingham served as Utah's defensive coordinator for ten seasons. He was named head coach of Utah after Urban Meyer left for the Florida Gators in 2004. He won AFCA Coach of the Year and the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award in 2008. Whittingham played linebacker for the BYU Cougars from 1978 to 1981. In 1981 he earned first-team all-WAC and WAC Defensive Player of the Year honors. Whittingham was also named the defensive MVP of the 1981 Holiday Bowl. He played in all of the first four Holiday Bowls. In his first appearance, he played as a running back and the other three as a linebacker, during which he recorded 27 tackles. In 2009, he was inducted into the Holiday Bowl Hall of Fame. He graduated from BYU in 1981 and went on to play linebacker for the Denver Gold and New Orleans Breakers of the USFL and the Calgary Stampeders of the CFL. He also played for the Los Angeles Rams' replacement squad in 1987. Whittingham became a graduate assistant for BYU during the 1985 and 1986 seasons. In 1987, Whittingham was named defensive coordinator at the
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Mike Donahue

    Mike Donahue

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael Joseph "Iron Mike" Donahue (June 14, 1876 – December 11, 1958 ) was an American football player, coach of football, basketball, baseball, tennis, track, soccer, and golf, and a college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Auburn University (1904–1906, 1908–1922), at Louisiana State University (1923–1927), and at Spring Hill College (1934–?). Donahue also coached basketball (1905–1921), baseball, track, and soccer (1912–?) at Auburn and baseball (1925–1926) and tennis (1946–1947) at LSU. He was inducted as a coach into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951. Donahue Drive in Auburn, Alabama, on which Jordan–Hare Stadium is located and the Tiger Walk takes place, is named in his honor. Donahue played quarterback at Yale University, from which he graduated in 1903. Upon graduating college, Donahue became the tenth head coach of the Auburn Tigers football team beginning in 1904. His coaching career saw immediate success, as his first team went undefeated at 5–0. Donahue's Auburn teams won two Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association titles, in 1913 and 1919. His 1913 squad has been retroactively recognized as a national champion by the
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Pete Carroll

    Pete Carroll

    • Current team head coached: Seattle Seahawks
    Peter Clay "Pete" Carroll (born September 15, 1951) is the "head coach" and executive Vice-President of the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League. He is a former head coach of the New York Jets, New England Patriots and the University of Southern California Trojans football team. Carroll was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Rita C. (née Bann) and James Edward "Jim" Carroll. Two of his paternal great-grandparents were Irish immigrants, and his maternal grandparents immigrated from Austria. Carroll attended Redwood High School in Larkspur, California. After being an athlete in childhood, his lack of physical growth as a teenager caused him frustration in high school sports; weighing 110 pounds as an incoming freshman, he was required to bring a special doctor's clearance in order to go out for football. He tried hard to prove himself, a trait that carried on throughout his later life. As a result, he was a three-sport standout in football (playing quarterback, wide receiver and defensive back), basketball and baseball, earning the school's Athlete of the Year award as a senior in 1969; forty years later he was inducted into the charter class of the Redwood
    5.75
    4 votes
    121
    Chris Petersen

    Chris Petersen

    • Current team head coached: Boise State Broncos football
    Chris Petersen (born October 13, 1964) is an American football coach, currently the head coach at Boise State University, a position he has held since the 2006 season. Petersen has guided the Broncos to two BCS bowl wins, in the 2007 Fiesta Bowl and the 2010 Fiesta Bowl. He is the first and only two-time winner of the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award, which he won in 2006 and 2009. He also won the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award in 2010. Born and raised in Yuba City, California, Petersen played safety and quarterback for the Honkers at Yuba City High School. After graduation in 1983, he played quarterback for the Sacramento City College Panthers for two seasons, then transferred to non-scholarship UC Davis, then in Division II. He earned a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1988 and a master's degree in education from UC Davis. Petersen began his coaching career in 1987 as the head freshman coach at UC Davis under Hall of Fame coach Jim Sochor. In 1989 he became the receivers coach for the varsity, departing in 1992 to become the quarterbacks coach at Pittsburgh. He moved back west in 1993 to coach the quarterbacks at Portland State under Tim Walsh; the Vikings advanced to the Division
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Hal Lahar

    Hal Lahar

    • Current team head coached:
    Harold W. "Hal" Lahar (July 14, 1919 – October 20, 2003) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Colgate University (1952 to 1956 and 1962 to 1967) and the University of Houston (1957 to 1961). Lahar was born in Durant, Oklahoma and attended Central High School in Oklahoma City. He later was an All-Southwest Conference guard for the Oklahoma Sooners under coach Tom Stidham. Lahar was selected 79th overall in the 1941 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears, where he spent the 1941 NFL season before serving with the United States Navy in the South Pacific during World War II. After leaving the service in 1945, Lahar played for the Buffalo Bills of the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1948 before beginning his college coaching career as an assistant under Otis Douglas at the University of Arkansas in 1950. In 1952 he became the 25th head coach at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. In 1957 he succeeded Bill Meek at the University of Houston, where he spent five years, before returning to Colgate in 1962, making him the first man to return to a Division I head-coaching job after leaving for another school. Following the 1967 season,
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Jack Pardee

    Jack Pardee

    • Current team head coached:
    John Perry Pardee (born April 19, 1936) is a former American football linebacker and the only head coach to helm a team in college football, the National Football League, the United States Football League, the World Football League, and the Canadian Football League. Pardee was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1986. As a teenager, Pardee moved to Christoval, Texas where he excelled as a member of the six-man football team (Pardee is the only six-man player to later have played or coached in the NFL). He was an All-American linebacker at Texas A&M University and a two-time All-Pro with the Los Angeles Rams (1963) and the Washington Redskins (1971). Pardee was one of the famed Junction Boys, the 1954 Texas A&M preseason camp held in Junction, Texas, by football coach Paul "Bear" Bryant. He was part of the 35 left from the approximately 100 players who went to Junction, Texas. After completing college at Texas A&M, Pardee was the 14th overall pick when he was drafted in the second round by the Los Angeles Rams as a linebacker. Pardee played for the Rams from 1957 to 1970; sitting out the 1965 season while battling melanoma. In 1971, Pardee joined the
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Mark Snyder

    Mark Snyder

    • Current team head coached:
    Mark Snyder (born December 30, 1964) is currently the defensive coordinator at Texas A&M University. He is the former head coach of the Marshall University Thundering Herd football team in Huntington, West Virginia. Snyder was the 28th head coach for the football squad after a four-year tenure with Ohio State University. The South Point, Ohio native is a 1988 graduate of Marshall. Snyder played in 1987 for the football squad, leading the Southern Conference with 10 interceptions and was second on the team with 124 tackles his senior year at Marshall and helped lead the Herd to a landmark come from behind win at Louisville and a berth in Marshall's first-ever national championship game. He captured honorable mention All-America honors and first-team All-Southern Conference honors that season as the Thundering Herd posted a 10-5 overall record and finished as national runners-up to Northeast Louisiana (43-42) in the 1987 Division 1-AA National Championship game. Snyder's 10 interceptions in 1987 still stands as the Marshall and Southern Conference single-season record. After graduating from Marshall, the following fall he began his coaching career as a student assistant coach for the
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Mike Holmgren

    Mike Holmgren

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael George Holmgren (born June 15, 1948) is an football coach and executive, most recently serving as president of the Cleveland Browns. Holmgren began his NFL career as a quarterbacks coach and later as an offensive coordinator with the San Francisco 49ers, in which he would earn two Superbowl rings. Then from 1992-1998, he served as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers, followed by head coaching the Seattle Seahawks from 1999 to 2008. Prior to his career in the National Football League, Holmgren coached football at the high school and collegiate levels. Holmgren is noted for his role in molding quarterbacks such as Steve Young, Brett Favre and Matt Hasselbeck during his tenures in San Francisco, Green Bay and Seattle, respectively. Under Holmgren's leadership and play calling the Green Bay Packers were consistent winners. He became known as one of the best coaches in the NFL, leading the Packers to their twelfth league championship in Super Bowl XXXI. Under Holmgren the Seahawks also became a frequent playoff team, including five division titles and the franchise's first Super Bowl appearance in 2005. In Cleveland, Holmgren has failed to improve the team, which was 5-11
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Otto Graham

    Otto Graham

    • Current team head coached:
    Otto Everett Graham, Jr. (December 6, 1921 – December 17, 2003) was an American football quarterback who played for the Cleveland Browns in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League. Graham is regarded by critics as one of the most dominant players of his era, having taken the Browns to league championship games every year between 1946 and 1955, winning seven of them. With Graham at quarterback, the Browns posted a record of 114 wins, 20 losses and four ties, including a 9–3 win–loss record in the playoffs. While most of Graham's statistical records have been surpassed in the modern era, he still holds the NFL record for career average yards gained per pass attempt, with nine. Long-time New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, a friend of Graham's, once called him "as great of a quarterback as there ever was." Graham grew up in Waukegan, Illinois, the son of music teachers. He entered Northwestern University in 1940 on a basketball scholarship, but football soon became his main sport. After a brief stint in the military at the end of World War II, Graham played during the 1946 season for the National Basketball League's Rochester Royals, who won the league
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Roy Kidd

    Roy Kidd

    • Current team head coached:
    Roy Kidd (born December 4, 1931) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Eastern Kentucky University from 1964 to 2002, compiling a record of 314–124–8. Kidd's Eastern Kentucky Colonels won NCAA Division I-AA Football Championships in 1979 and 1982 and were runners-up in 1980 and 1981. His 314 career victories are second-most in NCAA Division I-AA/FCS history, trailing only those of Grambling State's Eddie Robinson. Kidd was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2003. Kidd was a star football, basketball, and baseball player at Corbin High School in the Whitley County portion of Corbin, Kentucky. At Corbin, Kidd was a basketball teammate of college All-American Frank Selvy. There is currently a street, Roy Kidd Ave., named in his honor in Corbin. He graduated from Corbin in 1950 after being chosen as a first team All-State football player for the 1949 season by The Courier-Journal of Louisville. Kidd was signed to a football scholarship by Eastern Kentucky State College and played quarterback at the Richmond school from 1950 to 1953. Kidd actually turned down a scholarship to play for Bear Bryant at the University of
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Stanley Borleske

    Stanley Borleske

    • Current team head coached:
    Stanley Evans Borleske (August 20, 1888 – January 3, 1967) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at North Dakota Agricultural College, now North Dakota State University, (1919–1921, 1923–1924, 1928) and at Fresno State Teachers College, now Fresno State University, (1929–1932), compiling a career college football record of 36–36–7. Borleske's 1930 Fresno State football squad is one of only three in program history to complete a season undefeated. Borleske coached basketball at North Dakota Agricultural from 1919 to 1922 and at Fresno State from 1934 to 1939, tallying a mark of 75–75. He was also the head baseball coach at the two schools, from 1920 to 1921 and 1923 to 1924 at North Dakota Agricultural and from 1930 to 1941 at Fresno State, amassing a record of 99–58–1. Borleske selected the North Dakota Agricultural's mascot, the bison. He played college football at Michigan from 1908 to 1910.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Steve Dunlap

    Steve Dunlap

    • Current team head coached:
    Steve Dunlap (born in Hurricane, West Virginia) is the current assistant head coach and Special Teams Coordinator for the West Virginia Mountaineers football team. Dunlap has been with the Mountaineers on and off throughout his 33 year coaching career on the defensive side of the football. Dunlap has served on the staff of 16 bowl teams and coached in the 1988 National Championship Game. Dunlap is an alumnus of West Virginia University. He received a bachelor’s degree in 1976. He also played linebacker at WVU. He was a three year letter winner 1973-75. Dunlap set the schools records for total tackles in a season (190) and tackles in a single game (28.) Today he still ranks no. 10 on the school’s career tackle list with 359. He was also a member of the 1975 Peach Bowl team that defeated NC State.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Derek Dooley

    Derek Dooley

    • Current team head coached:
    Derek Dooley (born June 10, 1968) is head football coach at the University of Tennessee. He is the son of former University of Georgia head football coach and athletic director Vince Dooley. Dooley was born in Athens, Georgia in 1968, the son of University of Georgia coach Vince Dooley and his wife, radio talk show host Barbara Meshad Dooley. Dooley played high school football at Clarke Central High School in Athens under legendary coach Billy Henderson. He was a star tight end on the school's 1985 AAAA State Championship team. Dooley played alongside other notable Clarke Central (and later NFL) players, including kicker John Kasay (Seattle Seahawks, Carolina Panthers, New Orleans Saints), defensive end and former U.T. defensive line coach Chuck Smith (Atlanta Falcons, Carolina) and wide receiver Willie Green (four teams). Dooley was a walk-on wide receiver at the University of Virginia. He earned a scholarship with the Cavaliers following his second season and helped the school to three bowl appearances, including an ACC championship in 1989. In 1990, he was named first-team Academic All-ACC and participated in the Senior Bowl. He graduated in 1990 with a bachelor’s degree in
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    Jim Johnson

    Jim Johnson

    • Current team head coached:
    Jim Johnson (May 26, 1941 – July 28, 2009) was an American football coach, formerly serving as defensive coordinator with the Philadelphia Eagles. Widely regarded as one of the best defensive coordinators in the National Football League (NFL), he was especially known for being a master architect of blitzes, disguising them skillfully and keeping offenses constantly off-balance. In more than 40 years of coaching, Johnson held head coaching duties only once (at the collegiate level), but was interviewed by the Arizona Cardinals regarding their head coaching vacancy in 2004. A native of Maywood, Illinois, Johnson played college football for head coach Dan Devine at the University of Missouri from 1959–62. An all-Big Eight quarterback, Johnson played in the same backfield with long-time NFL executive Bill Tobin. He went undrafted in the 1963 NFL Draft, but was signed to play tight end by the Buffalo Bills of the AFL (1963–64). Johnson began his coaching career as head coach at Missouri Southern (1967–68), before serving four-year tenures at Drake University (1969–72) and Indiana University (1973–76). In 1977, Johnson was hired by his former head coach at Missouri, Dan Devine, as
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Joe Gibbs

    Joe Gibbs

    • Current team head coached:
    Joe Jackson Gibbs (November 25, 1940) is a former American football coach, NASCAR Championship team owner, and two time NHRA team owner. He was the 20th and 26th head coach in the history of the Washington Redskins (1981–1992, 2004–2007). Well known for his long hours and work ethic, Gibbs constructed what Steve Sabol has called, "The most diverse dynasty in NFL history," building championship teams with many players who have had mediocre to average careers while playing for other NFL teams. During his first stint in the National Football League, he coached the Redskins for 12 seasons and led them to eight playoff appearances, four NFC Championship titles, and three Super Bowl titles. After retiring at the end of the 1992 season, he switched focus to his NASCAR team, Joe Gibbs Racing, which has won three championships under his ownership, one with former driver Bobby Labonte and two with Tony Stewart. On January 7, 2004, Gibbs came out of retirement to rejoin the Redskins as head coach and team president, signing a 5-year, $28.5 million contract. On January 8, 2008, Gibbs resigned as Redskins' head coach and team president. Overall, during his 16 years with the team, Gibbs had only
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Joe Tiller

    Joe Tiller

    • Current team head coached:
    Joe Tiller (born December 7, 1942) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Wyoming from 1991 to 1996 and Purdue University from 1997 to 2008, compliling a career college football record of 126–92–1. Tiller is known as one of the innovators of the spread offense. Tiller was born in Toledo, Ohio and attended Montana State University, where he played football and was a member of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity. Tiller began his head coaching career at Wyoming, leading the Cowboys to a 39-30-1 record and one bowl appearance in six years. His best team was the 1996 unit, which notched a 10-2 record, but was left out of a bowl after losing to BYU in the inaugural WAC Championship game—to date, the last team to finish ranked in a major poll and not receive a bowl invitation while still being eligible to go. On the strength of that season, Tiller was hired by Purdue in 1997. Tiller inherited a program that had only had two winning seasons in the previous 18 years. However, the Boilermakers made an immediate splash in the second game of his rookie season with a nationally-televised upset of Notre Dame. Tiller would go on to lead
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Vince Lombardi

    Vince Lombardi

    • Current team head coached:
    Vincent Thomas "Vince" Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was an American football coach. He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight league championships and five in seven years, including winning the first two Super Bowls following the 1966 and 1967 NFL seasons. The National Football League's Super Bowl trophy is named in his honor. He was enshrined in the NFL's Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971. He played football at St. Francis Preparatory School, and later Fordham University. He began coaching as an assistant and later as a head coach at St. Cecilia High School. He would later become an assistant coach at Fordham University, the U.S. Military Academy, and the New York Giants before becoming a head coach for the Green Bay Packers from 1959 to 1967 and the Washington Redskins in 1969. He never had a losing season as a head coach in the NFL, compiling an impressive regular season winning percentage of 73.8% (96-34-6), a preseason winning percentage of 78.6% (44-12), and 90% (9-1) in the postseason for an overall record of 149 wins, 47 losses, and 6 ties in the NFL. Lombardi was born in Brooklyn to
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Houston Nutt

    Houston Nutt

    • Current team head coached:
    Houston Dale Nutt, Jr. (born October 14, 1957) is an American football coach and former player. Most recently he was the head football coach at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 2008 to 2011. Previously, he served as the head coach at Murray State University (1993–1996), Boise State University (1997), and the University of Arkansas (1998–2007). Nutt has served as an assistant coach under Lou Holtz and Jack Crowe. He currently works for CBS as a college football in studio analyst. Houston Nutt, Jr. was born in Arkansas. He is the son of the late Houston Dale Nutt, Sr., and Emogene Nutt and is the oldest of four children. Houston Nutt, Sr. briefly played basketball for the University of Kentucky under Adolph Rupp before transferring to Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State) in 1952. Nutt graduated from Little Rock Central High School. His parents taught at the Arkansas School for the Deaf at Little Rock, Arkansas for 35 years. His father also served as athletic director and head basketball coach for the school. His father was inducted into the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001. During his childhood, Houston and his brothers were daily members at the Billy Mitchell Boys and
    4.60
    5 votes
    136
    Brian Kelly

    Brian Kelly

    • Current team head coached: Notre Dame Fighting Irish football
    Brian Keith Kelly (born October 25, 1961) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame, a position he has held since the 2010 season. Kelly was previously head coach at the Grand Valley State University (1991–2003), Central Michigan University (2004–2006), and the University of Cincinnati (2006–2009). Kelly was born in Everett, Massachusetts, and was raised in an Irish American Catholic family in Chelsea, Massachusetts. He attended St. John's Preparatory School in Danvers, Massachusetts. His father was a Boston politician. He was a four-year letter winner at Assumption College as a linebacker. After graduating from Assumption in 1983 with a bachelor's degree in political science he served as linebackers coach, defensive coordinator, and softball coach from 1983 to 1986 at Assumption. Kelly joined the Grand Valley State University staff in 1987 as a graduate assistant and defensive backs coach for Tom Beck and became the defensive coordinator and recruiting coordinator in 1989. Kelly took over as head coach in 1991. In his final three seasons the Lakers went 41–2, at one point winning 20 consecutive games.
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Bronco Mendenhall

    Bronco Mendenhall

    • Current team head coached: BYU Cougars football
    Bronco Mendenhall is currently the head football coach at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. Since becoming head coach in 2005, Mendenhall has guided the Cougars to seven straight bowl invitations, two outright conference championships and regular national top-25 rankings. The Cougars finished their first season as a football independent in 2011 with a 10-3 record and No. 25 final ranking to finish nationally ranked for the fifth time in the last six seasons. Bronco Mendenhall graduated from American Fork High School in 1984. In 1990, Bronco Mendenhall served as a graduate assistant coach at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. From 1991 to 1993, he served as the defensive coordinator for Snow College, a junior college in Ephraim, Utah. From 1993 to 1994, he served as the defensive coordinator for Northern Arizona University. From 1995 to 1996, he served as the defensive coordinator for Oregon State. After the 1996 season he was fired from Oregon State. In 1997, he served as the Secondary Coach at Louisiana Tech. From 1998 to 2002, he served as the defensive coordinator for the University of New Mexico, where he and head coach Rocky Long developed a blitz-happy 3-3-5
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    George Allen

    George Allen

    • Current team head coached:
    George Herbert Allen (April 29, 1918 – December 31, 1990) was an American football coach in the National Football League and the United States Football League. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002. Allen was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Loretta M. and Earl Raymond Allen, who was recorded in the 1920 and 1930 U.S. census records for Wayne County, Michigan as working as a chauffeur to a private family. He earned varsity letters in football, track and basketball at Lake Shore High School in St. Clair Shores, Michigan. Allen went to Alma College and later at Marquette University, where he was sent as an officer trainee in the U. S. Navy's World War II V-12 program. He graduated with a B.S. in education from Eastern Michigan University. He attended the University of Michigan where he earned his M.S. in Physical Education in 1947. Coach Allen was the head college football coach for the Morningside Mustangs located in Sioux City, Iowa. He held that position for 3 seasons, from 1948 until 1950. His coaching record at Morningside was 16 wins, 11 losses and 2 ties. As of the conclusion of the 2009 season, this ranks him #5 at Morningside in total wins and #5 at
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Glen Mason

    Glen Mason

    • Current team head coached:
    Glen O. Mason (born April 9, 1950) is an American football coach. Mason previously served as the head football coach at Kent State University, the University of Kansas, and the University of Minnesota, compiling a career college football record of 123–121–1. Mason played college football at Ohio State University where he graduated from in 1972 with a B.A. in education. He was a linebacker on the depth chart behind Randy Gradishar, Stan White, Vic Koegel, Arnie Jones, and Rick Middleton. Mason served as an assistant coach at Ball State University, Allegheny College, Iowa State University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and The Ohio State University. He served as the outside linebackers coach and the offensive line coach at Ohio State in 1978 and 1979. In 1980, he was promoted to offensive coordinator of the Buckeyes and remained in that position through the 1985 season. Mason was head coach for Kent State University in 1986 and 1987 and the University of Kansas from 1988 to 1996. In 1995, as Kansas prepared for the Aloha Bowl against UCLA, Mason accepted the head coaching position at the University of Georgia. Mason had a change of heart and stayed with the
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Jack Del Rio

    Jack Del Rio

    • Current team head coached:
    Jack Del Rio (born April 4, 1963) is an American football coach, a former player, and is currently defensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League. Del Rio played both football and baseball for the University of Southern California Trojans, and then spent eleven years playing linebacker in the National Football League (NFL). He retired from playing in 1996 and went into coaching, serving in a variety of positions for several different NFL teams. In 2003 he was named head coach of the Jacksonville Jaguars, a position he held until November 29, 2011. In that capacity he set the NFL record for the longest tenure of any coach without winning a division championship--over eight years. Del Rio was born in Castro Valley, California. He attended and played basketball, baseball and football for Hayward High School in Hayward, California. He and former Seattle Mariners manager Don Wakamatsu were teammates in both sports while there. Del Rio was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays Major League Baseball team out of high school in 1981, but he opted instead to attend college. He enrolled at the University of Southern California, where he played both baseball and
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Les Miles

    Les Miles

    • Current team head coached: LSU Tigers football
    Leslie Edwin "Les" Miles, nicknamed "The Mad Hatter", (born November 10, 1953) is an American college football coach and the current head coach of the LSU football team. Prior to holding that position, he was head coach at Oklahoma State. He was formerly an assistant at Oklahoma State as well as Michigan, Colorado, and the Dallas Cowboys. Miles has held the head coaching position at LSU since January 2005 and coached the Tigers to a win in the 2008 BCS National Championship Game against Ohio State, 38–24. On 26 August 2011, his contract was extended to 2017. Miles earned all-state honors in football at Elyria High School in Ohio as well as letters in baseball and wrestling. He attended the University of Michigan where he was a two-year letterman under Coach Bo Schembechler from 1974 to 75. In 1980, Miles returned to Michigan as an assistant coach to Schembechler. He left Michigan in 1982 to coach at the University of Colorado where fellow Michigan assistant Bill McCartney had just been named head coach. Coincidentally, one of his fellow assistants on the Colorado staff was another future LSU head coach, Gerry DiNardo, who coached at LSU from 1995–99. He returned to Michigan in 1987
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Samuel Harding

    Samuel Harding

    • Current team head coached:
    Samuel Herbert "Pop" Harding (January 19, 1873 – May 19, 1919) was an American college football coach. He served as head coach at the Maryland Agricultural College (now known as the University of Maryland) in 1893 and led the team to a perfect 6–0 record and its first winning season. Harding was born on January 19, 1873 in Highland, Maryland. He attended the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland), where he played on the football team as a tackle from 1892 to 1894. In 1899, the Baltimore American wrote that he was "regarded as one of the best general athletes the college ever had." Harding served as the team captain and player-coach during the 1893 season and the Aggies amassed a perfect 6–0 record. His assistant coach was fullback Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr., son of a United States Senator from Maryland. Harding graduated from Maryland Agricultural College in 1895 with a Bachelor of Science degree from the Scientific Course. Beginning in 1896, Harding worked as a skilled laborer for the Water Department in Washington, D.C.. In the first football game of the 1899 season, Maryland was defeated, 21–0, by Western Maryland College, and its coach and best player,
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Samuel Newton

    Samuel Newton

    • Current team head coached:
    Sylvanus Blanchard "Samuel" Newton (December 4, 1868 – April 30, 1932) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Pennsylvania State University (1896–1898), Lafayette College (1899–1901, 1911), Lehigh University (1902–1905), and Williams College (1907–1909). Newton was the head football coach at Pennsylvania State University from 1896 to 1898. His career record at Penn State was 12–14. Newton coached at Lafayette College for four seasons and achieved a record of 47 wins, 33 losses, and 14 ties. His first season was arguably his best, as his team outscored its opponents by 253 to 23 and achieved a record of 12 wins and 1 loss. The teams only loss was to Princeton by a score of 12–0. Newton was the tenth head football coach for the Lehigh Mountain Hawks and he held that position for four seasons, from 1902 until 1905. His overall coaching record at Lehigh was 23 wins, 20 losses, and 2 ties. This ranks him ninth at Lehigh in terms of total wins and 12th at Lehigh in terms of winning percentage. While coaching at Lafayette, Newton's teams won The Rivalry game against Lehigh all seven times in three seasons. Newton later moved to Lehigh to coach
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Scott Linehan

    Scott Linehan

    • Current team head coached:
    Scott Thomas Linehan (born September 17, 1963) is an American football coach, currently the offensive coordinator for the Detroit Lions of the NFL. He was previously the head coach of the St. Louis Rams and the offensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins and the Minnesota Vikings. Prior to becoming an NFL coach in 2002, he was a collegiate assistant coach for thirteen seasons. Linehan was born and raised in Sunnyside, Washington, now a city of 16,000 in the lower Yakima Valley of eastern Washington. About three hours southeast of Seattle, Sunnyside bills itself as the "Asparagus Capital of the Northwest." He was a three-year starter at quarterback at Sunnyside High School, where his father was principal. Linehan graduated in 1982 and accepted a scholarship to play college football at the University of Idaho in Moscow, two hundred miles (320 km) to the east. He was a member of Dennis Erickson's first recruiting class as a collegiate head coach. Linehan's brothers Ron and Rick had played at Idaho in the 1970s, team leaders on defense. Linehan was a quarterback for the Vandals under head coaches Erickson (1982–85) and Keith Gilbertson. He redshirted in 1982 and was the back-up to
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Wayne Hardin

    Wayne Hardin

    • Current team head coached:
    Irving Wayne Hardin (born March 23, 1927) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the United States Naval Academy from 1959 to 1964 and at Temple University from 1970 to 1982, compiling a career college football record 118–74–5. Hardin led Navy to appearances in the 1961 Orange Bowl and the Cotton Bowl Classic in 1964, and coached two Midshipmen to the Heisman Trophy, Joe Bellino in 1960 and Roger Staubach in 1963. After leaving Navy, Hardin coached the Philadelphia Bulldogs of the Continental Football League, leading the team to a championship in 1966. Hardin was born in Smackover, Arkansas and attended high school in Stockton, California. He played college football at the College of the Pacific under Hall of Fame coach Amos Alonzo Stagg and his successor, Larry Siemering. Hardin won 11 varsity letters at Pacific before he graduated in 1950. He was inducted into the College of the Pacific's Athletics Hall of Fame in 1998. After serving as a student assistant coach in 1949 at Pacific, Hardin began his professional coaching career in 1950 at Ceres High School in Ceres, California. There he coached football and basketball. Hardin
    5.25
    4 votes
    146
    Bill Cowher

    Bill Cowher

    • Current team head coached:
    William Laird "Bill" Cowher (born May 8, 1957) is a former head coach in the NFL. Cowher resigned after 15 seasons as the Steelers' coach on January 5, 2007, 11 months to the day after winning 2005–06's Super Bowl XL. He currently is a studio analyst for The NFL Today. He appeared as the coach of the fictional Gotham Rogues team in The Dark Knight Rises. Born in Crafton, Pennsylvania, Cowher excelled in football, basketball, and track for Carlynton High in Crafton, a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At North Carolina State University, Cowher was a starting linebacker, team captain, and team MVP in his senior year. He graduated in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in education. He began his NFL career as a player. He was a free-agent linebacker with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1979, and then signed with the Cleveland Browns the following year. Cowher played three seasons (1980–82) in Cleveland, making him a member of the Kardiac Kids, before being traded back to the Eagles, where he played two more years (1983–84). His tenure in Philadelphia included tackling a young Jeff Fisher (who later became the head coach of the Tennessee Titans) when playing against the Chicago Bears, causing
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Fred Nielsen

    Fred Nielsen

    • Current team head coached:
    Fred Kenelm Nielsen (April 22, 1879 – January 12, 1963) was a Danish-American lawyer, diplomatic official, and college football coach. Nielsen served as the head football coach at the Maryland Agricultural College (now known as the University of Maryland) from 1905 to 1906, the George Washington University from 1907 to 1908, Georgetown University from 1910 to 1911, and the Catholic University of America from 1915 to 1916. Nielsen was born in Slagelse, Denmark on April 22, 1879. He emigrated to Omaha, Nebraska with his parents the following year. Nielsen attended the University of Nebraska, from which he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1902 and a LL. B. in 1904. During college, he played on the Cornhuskers football team as a halfback, and earned a varsity letter in 1900. Nielsen started his career with the United States Department of State in 1904. In 1905, the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) hired Nielsen as its head football coach. He replaced its previous coach, D. John Markey, who had quit after the school denied an increase to the job's $300 salary. Nielsen tolerated the low pay, however, because of his full-time job with the State
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Harold Iddings

    Harold Iddings

    • Current team head coached:
    Harold Jonathan "Hal" Iddings (c. 1888 – August 25, 1952) was an American football player and coach in both basketball and football. A 1909 graduate from the University of Chicago, he served as head football coach at Miami University (1909–1910), Simpson College (1911–1913), and Otterbein College (1916), compiling a career college football record of 15–20–1. Iddings was also the head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky (1910–1911), Simpson (1911–1914), Otterbein (1916–1917), and the Carnegie Institute of Technology (1920–1921). Iddings was an all-Big Ten player at the University of Chicago in 1907 and 1908 under legendary coach Amos Alonzo Stagg. In both years he helped the Maroons to the Big Ten title. In the 1907 and 1908 seasons the Maroons won all nine Big Ten contests and finished with an overall record of 4–1 and 5–0–1, respectively. Iddings was also the co-Big Ten champion in the pole vault in 1907. Both Iddings and Barton Haggard of Drake University reached 11’–4”. Iddings was a member of the Canton Bulldogs for part of the 1915 season. During this era of professional football, it was very common for players to be hired week to week. Teams did not establish
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Jim Leavitt

    Jim Leavitt

    • Current team head coached:
    Jim Leavitt (born December 5, 1956) is a former American football player and current linebackers coach for the San Francisco 49ers. He served as the head coach at the University of South Florida from the football program's inception in 1997 until 2009, compiling a record of 95–57. Leavitt grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida, and was a star quarterback for Dixie Hollins High School. After graduating from high school, Leavitt pursued studies at the University of Missouri, graduating in 1978. For the next two years, Leavitt worked as a graduate assistant. He then left for the University of Dubuque, where he spent two years as their football team's defensive coordinator. Following his years there, he went to Morningside College in 1982, spending one year as special teams coordinator before being promoted to defensive coordinator. After a brief stint at the University of Iowa where Leavitt pursued a doctorate degree in psychology, he followed Bill Snyder to Kansas State University in 1990. At Kansas State, Leavitt first spent two years as linebackers coach then four more as defensive coordinator, leading the Wildcats from relative obscurity to having a consistent, highly regarded
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Jon Gruden

    Jon Gruden

    • Current team head coached:
    Jon David Gruden (born August 17, 1963) is a former head coach and currently a color commentator for Monday Night Football on ESPN. In his first year as the head coach of Tampa Bay, the Buccaneers won Super Bowl XXXVII, defeating the Raiders whom he had left at the end of the preceding season. At the time, Gruden was the youngest head coach ever to win a Super Bowl, at 39 years, 5 months and 9 days. Gruden attended Clay High School in South Bend, Indiana, where his father Jim Gruden served as an assistant to Dan Devine at the University of Notre Dame. Feeling he would not have a chance to play for the Fighting Irish, Jon Gruden chose not to attend Notre Dame, where he would have received free tuition as a coach's child. Instead, he attended Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio. After just one year he transferred to the University of Dayton and was the back-up quarterback to Phil Nussman under coach Mike Kelly from 1982 until 1984. Immediately after graduating with a degree in communications, Gruden started his coaching career as a graduate assistant at the University of Tennessee during the 1986 season. He found his way as the quarterbacks coach at Southeast Missouri State for
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Lane Kiffin

    Lane Kiffin

    • Current team head coached: University of Southern California Trojans football
    Lane Monte Kiffin (born May 9, 1975) is the current head coach of the University of Southern California Trojans college football team. He previously served as offensive coordinator for the USC Trojans from 2005-2006, head coach of the NFL's Oakland Raiders from 2007-2008, and head coach of the Tennessee Volunteers in 2009. Kiffin was the youngest head coach in NFL history when he was with the Raiders, and is currently the youngest head coach of a BCS Conference team in college football. He is the son of longtime NFL defensive coordinator Monte Kiffin, who is the assistant head coach for USC. Kiffin also worked as a Graduate Assistant for one year at Colorado State University. In 1999, while he was working with the offensive line, the Rams played in the Liberty Bowl that season. Kiffin secured a job with the Jacksonville Jaguars as a quality control assistant for one year. He was then hired by Pete Carroll as a tight ends coach at USC. Kiffin joined the University of Southern California (USC) staff in 2001 and became the wide receivers coach in 2002. In 2004, he added the duties of passing game coordinator and was promoted to offensive coordinator in 2005. Kiffin also took the reins
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Lou Saban

    Lou Saban

    • Current team head coached:
    Louis Henry Saban (October 13, 1921 – March 29, 2009) was an American football player and coach. Saban played for Indiana University in college and as a pro for the Cleveland Browns of the All-America Football Conference. He was the head coach of the Boston Patriots (1960–1961), Buffalo Bills (1962–1965, 1972–1976), and Denver Broncos (1967–1971) of the American Football League and later the National Football League's American Football Conference, compiling a career AFL/NFL record of 95–99–7. Lou Saban is of Croat origin. At the time of his death, Saban was the last survivor of the eight coaches of the Original Eight American Football League franchises, the others being Eddie Erdelatz, Frank Filchock, Buster Ramsey, Lou Rymkus, Sammy Baugh, and Hall of Fame coaches Hank Stram and Sid Gillman. Saban was also the head coach at a number of colleges: Case Institute of Technology (1950–1952), Northwestern University (1955), Western Illinois University (1957–1959), the University of Maryland, College Park (1966), the University of Miami (1977–1978), the United States Military Academy (1979), the University of Central Florida (1983–1984), Peru State College (1991), the State University of
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Mike White

    Mike White

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael Kavanaugh White (born January 4, 1936) is former American football player and coach. He has 16 years experience as a head coach, including stints at the University of California, Berkeley (1972–1977), the University of Illinois (1980–1987) and the Oakland Raiders of the NFL (1995–1996). During his college coaching career, White was twice named National Coach of the Year, first in 1975 where he coached a team led by Joe Roth, Chuck Muncie and Wesley Walker to the Pac-8 co-championship. White moved to the University of Illinois in 1980. He succeeded Gary Moeller, who in three seasons at Illinois finished no higher than eighth in the Big Ten Conference. White quickly turned around the Illinois football program, posting a winning season in only his second year. In 1982, Illinois went to the Liberty Bowl, the school's first bowl appearance since the 1964 Rose Bowl. The 1982 Liberty Bowl was also notable as the final game coached by University of Alabama head coach Bear Bryant. In 1983, Illinois won its first Big Ten title in 20 years--and the school's last outright conference title in the pre-championship game era--with an overall record of 10–1, including a 9–0 conference
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Monte Kiffin

    Monte Kiffin

    • Current team head coached:
    Monte Kiffin (born February 29, 1940) is an American football coach. He is widely considered to be one of the preeminent defensive coordinators in modern football, as well as one of the greatest defensive coordinators in NFL history. Father of the widely imitated “Tampa Cover 2” defense, Kiffin's philosophy is one of the most influential in modern college and pro football. He currently serves as assistant head coach for the USC Trojans football program, where his son Lane Kiffin was named head coach on January 12, 2010. He previously served 26 years as an NFL assistant coach, including 13 years as defensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers with whom he won Super Bowl XXXVII. His defensive units have finished ranked in the top 10 in points allowed and yards allowed 10 times during that period, an NFL record. Kiffin was paid about $1.2 million per year by Tennessee, which made him the highest paid assistant coach in college football. He earned a reported $2 million annual salary from the Buccaneers and has turned down several NFL head coaching jobs during his career. To this day, Kiffin's only head coaching job was at North Carolina State University from 1980 to 82. Kiffin is
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Nile Kinnick

    Nile Kinnick

    • Current team head coached:
    Nile Clarke Kinnick, Jr. (July 9, 1918 – June 2, 1943) was a student and a college football player at the University of Iowa. He won the 1939 Heisman Trophy and was a consensus All-American. He died during a training flight while serving as a U.S Navy aviator in World War II. Kinnick was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951, and the University of Iowa renamed its football stadium Kinnick Stadium in his honor in 1972. Nile Clarke Kinnick, Jr., was the son of Nile Clark Kinnick, Sr., and Francis Clarke. He had two younger brothers, Ben and George. His maternal grandfather, George W. Clarke, graduated from the University of Iowa in 1878 and served two two-year terms as the Governor of Iowa from 1912 to 1916. Nile's parents were devoted to the teachings of Christian Science and helped Nile develop values of discipline, hard work, and strong morals. Nile was reportedly constantly thinking about self-improvement and working on turning personal weaknesses into strengths. Kinnick began showing athletic aptitude at a young age as well. As a youth, he played on a Junior Legion baseball team with the future major leaguer Bob Feller. As a sophomore at Adel High School,
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Pat “Gravy” Patterson

    Pat “Gravy” Patterson

    • Current team head coached:
    James E. "Gravy" Patterson, also known as Pat Patterson, (March 26, 1934 – October 11, 2007) was the most successful coach in the history of Louisiana college baseball. During his tenure as head coach from 1968 to 1990, the Louisiana Tech University Bulldogs, in Ruston, compiled a 741-462-2 record. Patterson produced eighteen winning seasons in twenty-three years, and his teams won forty or more games in five of those years. He was Conference Coach of the Year seven times. In retirement, he often returned as an interim coach. Seven of Patterson's players, including Mike Jeffcoat, Phil Hiatt, and David Segui, reached the majors. Patterson also coached high school baseball and college football. He should not be confused with the wrestler Pierre Clemont, who used the name "Pat Patterson" as his ring name. Patterson was born in Delhi in Richland Parish in northeastern Louisiana. He graduated from Louisiana Tech in 1958, playing football and baseball under legendary Bulldog coaches Joe Aillet and Berry Hinton. He earned four football letters and two baseball letters and went on to earn his master’s degree from the University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss") in 1961. (1) He began his coaching
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Rich Rodriguez

    Rich Rodriguez

    • Current team head coached: Arizona Wildcats football
    Richard A. "Rich" Rodriguez (born May 24, 1963) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Arizona. Rodriguez previously served as the head football coach at Salem University (1988), Glenville State College (1990–1996), West Virginia University (2001–2007), and the University of Michigan (2008–2010). His career college football coaching record stands at 120–84–2. In 2011, Rodriguez worked as an analyst for CBS Sports. A native of Grant Town, West Virginia, Rodriguez graduated from North Marion High School in 1981 where he played four sports and was an all-state football and basketball player. After high school, Rodriguez attended West Virginia University. Playing as a defensive back, Rodriguez recorded 54 career tackles over three seasons. During the 1985–1986 season, Rodriguez served as a student assistant under head coach Don Nehlen and graduated with a Physical Education degree. In 1986, he moved to what was then Salem College (now Salem International University) where he served as special teams coordinator and secondary coach. In 1987, he became Salem’s defensive coordinator and in 1988 took over as head coach.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Tony Dungy

    Tony Dungy

    • Current team head coached:
    Anthony Kevin "Tony" Dungy (/ˈdʌndʒi/DUN-jee; born October 6, 1955) is a former professional American football player and coach in the National Football League. Dungy was head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 1996 to 2001, and head coach of the Indianapolis Colts from 2002 to 2008. Dungy became the first African American head coach to win the Super Bowl when his Colts defeated the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI. Dungy set a new NFL record for consecutive playoff appearances by a head coach in 2008 after securing his tenth straight playoff appearance with a win against the Jacksonville Jaguars. After the 2008 season, Dungy announced his retirement as coach of the Indianapolis Colts, which went into effect after the 2008–2009 season. Since retirement, Dungy has served as an analyst on NBC's Football Night in America. Tony Dungy is also the national spokesman for the fatherhood program All Pro Dad. The Colts qualified for the playoffs in every season they were coached by Dungy. After playing quarterback in college for the University of Minnesota, Dungy went undrafted in 1976 and was signed as a free agent by the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League as a defensive
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    William Roper

    William Roper

    • Current team head coached:
    William Winston "Bill" Roper (August 22, 1880 – December 10, 1933) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the Virginia Military Institute (1903–1904), Princeton University (1906–1908, 1910–1911, 1919–1930), the University of Missouri (1909), and Swarthmore College (1915–1916), compiling a career college football record of 112–38–18. Roper's Princeton Tigers football teams of 1906, 1911, 1920, and 1922 have been recognized as national champions. His 89 wins are the most of any coach in the history of the program. Roper was also the head basketball coach at Princeton for one season in 1902–1903, tallying a mark of 8–7. Roper played football as an end, basketball, and baseball as an outfielder at Princeton, from which he graduated in 1902. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. Roper was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on August 22, 1880. He attended the William Penn Charter School where he played football, basketball, and baseball. He continued all three sports in college at Princeton University. Roper was the sixth head football coach for the Virginia Military Institute
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Gene Chizik

    Gene Chizik

    • Current team head coached:
    Eugene T. "Gene" Chizik (born December 28, 1961) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach of the Auburn University football team, a position he has held since the 2009 season. Chizik's 2010 Auburn Tigers football team completed a 14–0 season with a victory over Oregon in the BCS National Championship Game. Chizik played college football at the University of Florida in 1981 for head coach Charley Pell. Chizik began his coaching career at Seminole High School, serving as their defensive coordinator and inside linebacker coach from 1986 to 1988. He then became a graduate assistant at Clemson from 1988 to 1989, working with the outside linebackers. During his time at Clemson he coached in the 1988 Citrus Bowl and the 1989 Gator Bowl, under secondary coach Bill Oliver. His initial full-time coaching job was as the defensive ends coach at Middle Tennessee State from 1990 to 1991. In 1990, the Blue Raiders won the Ohio Valley Conference championship. His next assignment was at Stephen F. Austin, serving as their linebackers coach from 1992 to 1995. SFA advanced to the Division I-AA semifinals in 1995. He was then promoted to the defensive coordinator
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Jerry Moore

    Jerry Moore

    • Current team head coached:
    Gerald Hundley "Jerry" Moore (born July 18, 1939) is the current head football coach of the Appalachian State University Mountaineers located in the town of Boone in Watauga County, North Carolina. He has filled the position since 1989. Moore has had a winning record in 19 out of the last 20 seasons. He led the Mountaineers to the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship in 2005. This was the third national championship for any collegiate football team in the state of North Carolina and the first of any team at the NCAA Division I level. Moore and the Mountaineers repeated as champions in 2006 and 2007, for the first "three-peat" in Division I FCS/I-AA history. Moore played wide receiver for the Baylor Bears. He was coached by Sam Boyd in 1958 and John Bridgers in 1959 and 1960. Moore captained the 1960 Gator Bowl team that ended the year as the nation's eleventh-ranked squad. Moore received degrees from Baylor University in finance and economics. Moore began his coaching career at Corsicana High School under Texas high school coach Jim Acree. In 1965, he became assistant coach at SMU. After the 1972 season, he joined the Nebraska Cornhuskers as receivers coach, becoming offensive
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Lee McClung

    Lee McClung

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas Lee "Bum" McClung (March 26, 1870 – December 19, 1914) was an American football player who later served as the 22nd Treasurer of the United States. McClung was born in Knoxville, Tennessee. His father was Frank H. McClung, a merchant, and he was related to Albert Sidney Johnston and John Marshall. He attended Phillips Exeter Academy and went on to Yale University, where he was class leader, received the largest number of votes as its most popular member in his senior year, and was a member of Skull and Bones. He was chairman of his class's Junior Promenade Committee. McClung, who was always known as Lee from his college days onward, was perhaps the best-known football player in the country while at Yale. In his athletic prime he stood 5'10", weighed between 165 and 180 lbs., was on the varsity baseball team, and played in every football season from 1888 to 1891 on teams that compiled a 54-2 record and a 2269-49 point total. (It was unusual to make the team as a freshman at the time, but McClung did, being the only freshman to play on the noted 1888 team.) He himself was credited with scoring 176 points in 1889 and 494 in his career. He was captain of the unscored-upon Yale
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Nick Saban

    Nick Saban

    • Current team head coached: Alabama Crimson Tide Football
    Nicholas Lou "Nick" Saban (born October 31, 1951) is an American college football coach and the current head coach of the University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team. Saban had previously served as head coach of the National Football League's Miami Dolphins and three other NCAA universities: LSU, Michigan State and Toledo. His eight-year contract for a total of US$32 million made him one of the highest paid football coaches, professional or college, in the United States at the time. He appeared on the September 1, 2008 cover of Forbes magazine as "The Most Powerful Coach in Sports". Saban's career record as a collegiate head coach is 152–54–1. Saban led LSU to the 2003 BCS National Championship and Alabama to the 2009 and 2011 BCS and AP National Championships, making him the first coach in college football history to win a national championship with two different Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools. Saban and Paul "Bear" Bryant are the only coaches to win an SEC championship at two different schools. Saban was an assistant coach at Kent State, Syracuse, West Virginia, Ohio State, Navy and Michigan State in NCAA Division I-A, and with the Houston Oilers and Cleveland
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Steve Owen

    Steve Owen

    • Current team head coached:
    Stephen Joseph Owen (April 21, 1898 – May 17, 1964) was an American football player and coach who earned a place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as head coach of the National Football League's New York Giants from 1930 to 1953. Owen's skill at designing defenses, his fundamental approach to the game, and his innovative "A Formation," a variation on the single-wing, also helped his offenses thrive and served as the keys to his success. His tenure is remembered today by the odd congruence of his gravelly voice and easy disposition, as well as his perpetual tobacco chewing. Owen was born and raised in a Native American area of the Oklahoma Territory, where his original goal was to become a jockey, a dream denied by his 5–11, 230 pound frame that earned him the nickname, "Stout Steve." In addition to working on a cattle ranch, Owen attended Phillips University in Enid, Oklahoma where he was an all-around athlete for two years beginning in 1917. Adding to his income during this period, he wrestled professionally under the name "Jack O'Brien," a ruse that allowed him to preserve his amateur status. Owen served in the U.S. Army training corps, then returned to coach one year at Phillips
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Lou Holtz

    Lou Holtz

    • Current team head coached:
    Dr. Louis Leo "Lou" Holtz (born January 6, 1937) is a retired American football coach, and active sportscaster, author, and motivational speaker. He served as the head football coach at The College of William & Mary (1969–1971), North Carolina State University (1972–1975), the University of Arkansas (1977–1983), the University of Minnesota (1984–1985), the University of Notre Dame (1986–1996), and the University of South Carolina (1999–2004), compiling a career record of 249–132–7. Holtz's 1988 Notre Dame team went 12–0 with a victory in the Fiesta Bowl and was the consensus national champion. Holtz is the only college football coach to lead six different programs to bowl games and the only coach to guide four different programs to the final top 20 rankings. Holtz also coached the New York Jets of the NFL during the 1976 season. Over the years, the slender, bespectacled Holtz has become known for his quick wit and ability to inspire players. He is often found as a guest on the popular Richmond, Virginia based Kain Road Radio. In 2005, Holtz joined ESPN as a college football analyst. On May 1, 2008, Holtz was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame. Holtz was born in
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    S. M. Cooke

    S. M. Cooke

    • Current team head coached:
    Samuel M. Cooke (August 7, 1879 – year of death unknown) was an American college football coach. He served as head coach for the football team at the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1899. A native of Hyattsville, Maryland, Cooke enrolled at the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1897. He played on the football team from 1897 to 1899 as a fullback. In the 1898 game against Western Maryland, Cooke performed the dubious feat of kicking a punt from midfield over his head and backwards 25 yards. The opponent scored a touchdown shortly thereafter. The following season, the team elected Cooke as captain, but he suffered a broken arm in the first game against Western Maryland. By Thanksgiving, he returned to the sport, playing for the Hyattsville town team. Cooke left the college before graduating and went to work for the Potomac Electric Power Company in Washington, D.C. He married Mary née Ward on March 28, 1910.
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Andy Reid

    Andy Reid

    • Current team head coached:
    Andrew Walter "Andy" Reid (born March 19, 1958) is the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL, a post he has held since 1999. Since 2001, he has also been the team's executive vice president of football operations. He led the Eagles to five NFC championship games, including four consecutive appearances from 2001-2004, and to Super Bowl XXXIX in 2004. Born in Los Angeles, California, Reid attended John Marshall High School and worked as a vendor at Dodger Stadium as teenager. He also played youth sports in Los Angeles, and among his coaches was Pete Arbogast, who is the radio announcer for the USC football team, and formerly the radio play-by-play man for the Cincinnati Bengals. He also grew up with now sportscaster/Baseball player/coach Rich Perez in Los Feliz. (Perez now in Las Vegas,) playing sports in those early years of 1967-73. In 1971 (at age 13) Reid appeared live on Monday Night Football during the Punt, Pass, and Kick competition. Reid played offensive guard and defensive end at Brigham Young University for head coach LaVell Edwards. After graduating from BYU in 1981, he spent one year as a graduate assistant on the school's football coaching staff. He spent the
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Bobby Petrino

    Bobby Petrino

    • Current team head coached:
    Robert P. "Bobby" Petrino (born March 10, 1961) is a former American football coach. He was the head football coach at the University of Arkansas from 2008 to 2011, before being dismissed in the spring of 2012 for not disclosing an "inappropriate relationship" with a female employee. He also coached the Atlanta Falcons of the NFL for a portion of the 2007 season and was the head football coach at the University of Louisville from 2003 to 2006. Prior to that, he spent 20 years as an assistant in the collegiate and professional ranks. Petrino grew up in Helena, Montana, and graduated from Capital High in 1979. He attended hometown Carroll College, graduating with a physical education and a math minor in 1983. While at Carroll College he played quarterback and he began his coaching career there as a graduate assistant during the 1983 season. The next year he moved to Weber State University in the Big Sky Conference, coaching quarterbacks as a graduate assistant under head coach Mike Price. Petrino returned to his alma mater in 1985 as offensive coordinator. In each of his two seasons in that position, Carroll had the top-rated offense in NAIA football. Petrino spent a year as
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Darrell Royal

    Darrell Royal

    • Current team head coached:
    Darrell K Royal (born July 6, 1924) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Mississippi State University (1954–1955), the University of Washington (1956), and the University of Texas at Austin (1957–1976), compiling a career college football record of 184–60–5. In his 20 seasons at Texas, Royal's teams won three national championships (1963, 1969, 1970), 11 Southwest Conference titles, and amassed a record of 167–47–5. He is the winningest coach in Texas Longhorns football history. Royal also coached the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League for one season in 1953. He played football at the University of Oklahoma from 1946 to 1949. Royal was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1983. Darrell K Royal – Texas Memorial Stadium in Austin, Texas, where the Longhorns play their home games, was renamed in his honor in 1996. "K" is Royal's given middle name, not an abbreviation. He received it in honor of his mother, Katy, who died when he was an infant. She died of cancer, but because of the stigma surrounding the disease at that time, Royal was led to believe until he was an adult that she had died giving birth to
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Dick Harlow

    Dick Harlow

    • Current team head coached:
    Richard Cresson "Dick" Harlow (October 19, 1889 – February 19, 1962) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Pennsylvania State University (1915–1917), Colgate University (1922–1925), Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College (1926–1934), and Harvard University (1935–1942, 1945–1947), compiling a career college football record of 149–69–17. Harlow pioneered modern defensive schemes. Often fielding undersized teams, he pioneered coordinated stunts to get around or between blockers rather than trying to overpower them. His offenses were based on deception and timing rather than power, utilizing shifts, reverses, and lateral passes. Harlow was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Harlow attended Pennsylvania State University. As a tackle at Penn State, Harlow distinguished himself during the 1910 and 1911 seasons. A two-year letterman, he also was a member of the baseball and track and field teams. Upon graduation from Penn State, Harlow remained with the Nittany Lions football team as an assistant coach for three seasons and was named head coach in 1915. After
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Frank Kenly

    Frank Kenly

    • Current team head coached:
    James Frank Kenly, Jr. (April 18, 1877 – year of death unknown) was an American engineer and college football coach. He coached the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1898, where he amassed a 2–5–1 record. Kenly was born in Harford County near Level, Maryland on April 18, 1877. He enrolled at the Maryland Agricultural College in 1895, and played on the football team from 1896 to 1898 as a quarterback. In 1898, he served as the team's head coach and captain, and Maryland amassed a 2–5–1 record. After the season, the Reveille yearbook wrote, "Manager McCandlish and Captain Kenly worked faithfully with the material they had, but the team was deficient in weight as compared with the others of the league." He graduated from the Maryland Agricultural College in 1899 with a degree in mechanical engineering. Kenly worked for the Port Chester Bolt and Nut Company, Baldwin Locomotive Works, York Safe and Lock Company, H. S. Kerbaugh, Inc., American Bridge Company, Pennsylvania Steel Company, and the Carnegie Steel Company.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    June Jones

    June Jones

    • Current team head coached: SMU Mustangs football
    June Sheldon Jones, III (born February 19, 1953) is an American football coach and former NFL player. As of 2012 he is the head football coach at Southern Methodist University, where he has served as head coach since the 2008 season. Jones was the head football coach at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa from 1999 to 2007. Previously, he coached in the National Football League: a three-year tenure as head coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 1994 to 1996 and a ten-game stint as interim head coach of the San Diego Chargers in 1998. Jones grew up in Portland, Oregon, the second of four children born to Marilyn and June Jones Jr. Jones played the quarterback position on three college teams: Oregon (1971–1972), Hawaii (1973–1974), and Portland State (1975–1976). It is during his time at Portland State that he was introduced to the Run and Shoot offense by Mouse Davis. It would be an offense that he would later champion throughout his coaching career. His two seasons at Portland State resulted in totals of 5,798 yards passing with 50 TD against 20 INT. He became the first quarterback to give the Run and Shoot legitimacy as a quarterback friendly offense. In the years prior, Portland State
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Matt Millen

    Matt Millen

    • Current team head coached:
    Matthew George "Matt" Millen (born March 12, 1958) is an American former National Football League linebacker and a former executive. Millen played for the Oakland Raiders, the San Francisco 49ers and the Washington Redskins. In Millen's 12-year NFL playing career, he played on four Super Bowl-winning teams. Millen won a Super Bowl ring with each of the three teams for which he played. After his playing career, Millen was President and CEO of the Detroit Lions from 2001 until 2008. His eight-year tenure as head of the franchise led to the worst eight-year record in the history of the modern NFL (31-97), and resulted in his termination on September 24, 2008. Following his NFL career, he was a football commentator for several national television and radio networks. His last job before joining the Lions was as a member of the number two broadcast team for the NFL on Fox, as well as being the color commentator for Monday Night Football on Westwood One. On February 1, 2009, he joined the NBC broadcast team for pre-game analysis of Super Bowl XLIII. He was employed by ESPN as an NFL analyst, and by NFL Network as a color commentator on Thursday Night Football, but currently only does
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Randy Shannon

    Randy Shannon

    • Current team head coached:
    Randy Lennard Shannon (born February 24, 1966) is an American football coach, currently the linebacker coach at TCU. He previously served as the head football coach at the University of Miami from 2007 to 2010 and the defensive coordinator at Miami from 2001 to 2006. In the 1980s Shannon played linebacker at Miami and then with the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL. When Shannon was three years old, his father was murdered. At 10, his older twin brothers became addicted to crack cocaine. His twin brothers and older sister died of AIDS and a third brother spent significant time in prison. Shannon attended Miami Norland High School and earned all-state and honorable mention All-America recognition from Street & Smith's as a senior linebacker at Norland. Shannon also competed in basketball, averaging 19 points a game, and competed in the triple jump on the track and field team. He played college football for the University of Miami, starting at outside linebacker for the 1987 national championship team. After graduating in 1988, Shannon played briefly as a linebacker for the Dallas Cowboys, having been drafted by Jimmy Johnson "in order to teach his bigger, faster linebackers how to play the
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Basil Hayden

    Basil Hayden

    • Current team head coached:
    Basil Ewing Hayden (May 19, 1899 – January 9, 2003) was an American college basketball player and coach. A Kentucky native, he began playing the sport in the sixth grade and, after a year at Transylvania University, transferred to the University of Kentucky to study chemistry and play on the school's basketball squad. He captained the team to victory at the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association Championship and was named an All-American for his efforts – the first basketball player to earn the honor at the University of Kentucky. After graduating in 1922 Hayden took on a number of different jobs and was called to coach the University of Kentucky's basketball team in 1926 following the departure of Ray Eklund. After a 3–13 record in his first year he was replaced with John Mauer and returned to his previous occupations. When he died in 2003, at the age of 103, he was the University of Kentucky's oldest former athlete, and his jersey is among those hung in the school's Rupp Arena. Hayden was born in Stanford, Kentucky; his father Joseph was a grocer, and his mother Annie (née: Brown) was a tutor. He moved to Paris, Kentucky at an early age and began playing basketball in the
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Bill Hollenback

    Bill Hollenback

    • Current team head coached:
    William Marshall "Big Bill" Hollenback (February 22, 1886 – March 12, 1968) was an American football player and coach. He played football at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was selected as an All-American fullback three straight years, from 1906 to 1908. Hollenback served as the head football coach at Pennsylvania State University (1909, 1911–1914), the University of Missouri (1910), Pennsylvania Military College, now Widener University (1912, 1915), and Syracuse University (1916), compiling a career college football record of 46–19–8. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1951. Born in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, Hollenback attended Phillipsburg High School. As an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania from 1904 to 1908, he became one of the school's most renowned football players. He played end in 1904. He was unable to play during the 1905 season due to a broken leg. After returning from the injury, Hollenback was moved to the fullback, a position he played from 1906 to 1908. He was selected as an All-American fullback in each of those years. As a senior in 1908, Holleback was the captain of the undefeated Penn team that was named
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Clark Shaughnessy

    Clark Shaughnessy

    • Current team head coached:
    Clark Daniel Shaughnessy (March 6, 1892 – May 15, 1970) was an American football coach and innovator. He is sometimes called the "father of the T formation", although that system had previously been used as early as the 1880s. Shaughnessy did, however, modernize the obsolescent T formation to make it once again relevant in the sport. He employed his innovations most famously on offense, but on the defensive side of the ball as well, and he earned a reputation as a ceaseless experimenter. Shaughnessy held head coaching positions at Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, the University of Chicago, Stanford University, the University of Maryland, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Hawaii, and in the National Football League with the Los Angeles Rams. Shaughnessy also served in advisory capacities with the Chicago Bears and the Washington Redskins. He reached the height of his success in 1940, in his first season at Stanford, where he led the Indians to an undefeated season that culminated with a Rose Bowl victory. That year, he also helped prepare the Chicago Bears for the 1940 NFL Championship Game, in which they routed Washington, 73–0. Shaughnessy's
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Don Faurot

    Don Faurot

    • Current team head coached:
    Donald Burrows Faurot (June 23, 1902 – October 19, 1995) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the Northeast Missouri State Teachers College, now Truman State University, from 1926 to 1934 and at the University of Missouri from 1935 to 1942 and again from 1946 to 1956. During World War II, Faurot coached the Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawks in 1943 and the football team at Naval Air Station Jacksonville in 1944. He was also the head basketball coach at the Northeast Missouri State Teachers College from 1925 to 1934, tallying a mark of 92–74. Faurot lettered in three sports while at Missouri form 1922 to 1924: in football, as a halfback, basketball and baseball. Faurot is credited with inventing the split-T formation. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1961. The playing surface as Missouri's Memorial Stadium was named Faurot Field in his honor in 1972. Faurot was born in Mountain Grove, Missouri on June 23, 1902 to parents Frederick W. Faurot and Charlotte Burrows Faurot. He lost two fingers on his right hand in a boyhood farming accident, yet still became an accomplished multi-sport
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Earle "Greasy" Neale

    Earle "Greasy" Neale

    • Current team head coached:
    Alfred Earle "Greasy" Neale (November 5, 1891 – November 2, 1973) was an American football and baseball player and coach. He played Major League Baseball as an outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds between 1916 and 1924 and briefly with the Philadelphia Phillies for part of the 1921 season. Neale was the starting right fielder for the 1919 Cincinnati Reds. He batted .357 in the 1919 World Series and led the Reds with ten hits in their eight-game series win over the scandalous White Sox. Neale also played professional football in the Ohio League with the Canton Bulldogs in 1917, the Dayton Triangles in 1918, and the Massillon Tigers in 1919. At Canton, he played alongside the great Jim Thorpe. Neale also coached the Dayton Triangles in 1918. Neale began his coaching career while still a professional player. He served as the head football coach at Muskingum College (1915), West Virginia Wesleyan College (1916–1917), Marietta College (1919–1920), Washington & Jefferson College (1921–1922), the University of Virginia (1923–1928), and West Virginia University (1931–1933), compiling a career college football record of 82–54–11. At Washington & Jefferson, he led his 1921 squad to the Rose
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Frank Leahy

    Frank Leahy

    • Current team head coached:
    Francis William Leahy (August 27, 1908 – June 21, 1973) was an American football player, coach, college athletics administrator, and professional sports executive. He served as the head football coach at Boston College from 1939 to 1940 and at the University of Notre Dame from 1941 to 1943 and again from 1946 to 1953, compiling a career college football record of 107–13–9. His winning percentage of .864 is the second best in NCAA Division I football history, trailing only that fellow Notre Dame Fighting Irish coach, Knute Rockne, for whom Leahy played from 1928 to 1930. Leahy played on two Notre Dame teams that won national championships, in 1929 and 1930, and coached four more, in 1943, 1946, 1947, and 1949. Leahy was also the athletic director at Notre Dame from 1947 until 1949 when he passed the role to the Fighting Irish basketball coach, Moose Krause, so that he could focus on football coaching. Leahy served as the general manager of the AFL's Los Angeles Chargers during their inaugural season in 1960. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1970. Leahy was born in O'Neill, Nebraska and graduated from Winner High School in Winner, South Dakota
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Mike Ditka

    Mike Ditka

    • Current team head coached:
    Michael Keller Ditka, Jr. (born October 18, 1939) is a former American football NFL player, television commentator, and coach. Ditka coached the Chicago Bears for 11 years and New Orleans Saints for three years. Ditka and Tom Flores are the only two people to win an NFL title as a player, an assistant coach, and a head coach. Ditka was the only individual to participate in both of the last two Chicago Bears' championships, as a player in 1963 and as head coach in 1985. Ditka was born as Michael Dyczko in the Pittsburgh-area town of Carnegie, Pennsylvania on October 18, 1939. The oldest child of Mike Sr. and Charlotte, he grew up in nearby Aliquippa, Pennsylvania with siblings Ashton, David, and Mary Ann. Mike Sr., a welder, was one of three brothers of a Ukrainian family in the coal mining and steel manufacturing area in Western Pennsylvania. The surname "Dyczko" was difficult to pronounce in his hometown, so the family name was changed to "Ditka." Ditka attended St. Titus School. A three-sport star at Aliquippa High School, Ditka hoped to escape his hometown's manufacturing jobs by attending college with a football scholarship. Planning to become a dentist, he was recruited by
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Xen C. Scott

    Xen C. Scott

    • Current team head coached:
    Xenophon "Xen" Cole Scott (July 6, 1882 – April 21, 1924) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach and a sportswriter in the United States. He served as the head football coach at Western Reserve University in 1910, at the Case School of Applied Science from 1911 to 1913—both Western Reserve and Case are now part of Case Western Reserve University, and at the University of Alabama from 1919 to 1922, compiling a career college football record of 49–26–4. Born in Pasadena, California in 1882, Scott moved to Cleveland, Ohio with his family when he was four. Prior to being hired as head football coach, Scott was a horse-racing writer in Cleveland, Ohio. He also contributed material to the Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide in 1907 and 1908. In 1907 he became an assistant coach at Western Reserve University in Cleveland. In 1910, Scott was hired to be head coach at the Nebraska State Normal School in Peru, Nebraska, where he also coached baseball and basketball. He compiled a 29–9–3 (.744) record at Alabama. His first Tide team went 8–1 to set a school record for victories in a season; his second team did better, going 10–1 and finishing atop the standings of the
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Fisher DeBerry

    Fisher DeBerry

    • Current team head coached:
    Fisher DeBerry (born June 8, 1938) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the United States Air Force Academy from 1984 to 2006, compiling a record of 169–109–1. DeBerry led 17 of his 23 Air Force Falcons squads to winning records and 12 captured a bowl game bid. Three times his teams won the Western Athletic Conference title, in 1985, 1995, and 1998. DeBerry retired on December 15, 2006 with the most wins and highest winning percentage (.608) in Air Force football history. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2011. DeBerry was born in Cheraw, South Carolina in 1938. In high school, DeBerry was a four-sport varsity letter winner, lettering five times in baseball, three times each in football and basketball and twice in track. He was also an all-state selection in baseball and football. DeBerry graduated in 1960 from Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where he lettered in football and baseball. He was also active in the Kappa Sigma Fraternity while in college. After six years of coaching and teaching in the South Carolina high school ranks, DeBerry returned to Wofford, where he coached for
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Phillip Fulmer

    Phillip Fulmer

    • Current team head coached:
    Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950) is a TV college football analyst and the former head coach of the Tennessee Volunteers football team, who compiled a 152–52 record from 1992–2008 as head coach, but was fired during a 5–7 season in 2008. He is best known for coaching the Volunteers in the first ever BCS National Championship Game in 1998, defeating Florida State University. Fulmer was the Volunteers' 20th head football coach. At the end of his tenure at Tennessee, Fulmer had the second-highest number of wins of any head coach in Tennessee history, just 21 behind legendary coach Robert Neyland. Fulmer also was only the third coach in Tennessee history to win a claimed national championship. His 1997-1998 teams remain (as of 2011) to be the last teams to win consecutive SEC championships. Despite a decline in the later years of his career, he was considered by many to be an icon of college football, especially one of institutional loyalty. In recognition of his accomplishments at Tennessee, Phillip Fulmer was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Fulmer was born in Winchester, Tennessee where he attended Franklin County High School. Fulmer enrolled at the University
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Bob Stoops

    Bob Stoops

    • Current team head coached: Oklahoma Sooners football
    Robert Anthony "Bob" Stoops (born September 9, 1960) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. During the 2000 season, Stoops led the Sooners to an Orange Bowl victory and a national championship. Prior to coaching at Oklahoma, Stoops held various coordinator and position-coach positions at Iowa, Kansas State and Florida. In 2000, Stoops led his team to three consecutive wins over ranked teams including Texas, Kansas State and Nebraska. Stoops was awarded the 2000 Paul "Bear" Bryant Award and the 2000 and 2003 Walter Camp Coach of the Year for "Coach of the Year." Stoops is one of 6 children born to Ron Sr. and Evelyn "Dee Dee" Stoops in Youngstown, Ohio. He is a 1978 graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School, where his father was the long-time defensive coordinator of the football team. Bob and his three brothers (Ron Jr., Mike, and Mark) were all coached by Ron Sr. at Mooney. During a game in 1988 against the team coached by Ron Jr., Ron Sr. began experiencing chest pains. He was placed in an ambulance following the game and died en route to the hospital. Stoops was a four-year starter, and one-time All-Big Ten selection at defensive back at the University of
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Bum Phillips

    Bum Phillips

    • Current team head coached:
    Oail Andrew "Bum" Phillips (born September 29, 1923) is a retired American football coach and the father of Wade Phillips, the Defensive Coordinator for the Houston Texans. "Bum" Phillips coached at the high school, college and professional levels. Phillips played football at Lamar College (now Lamar University) in Beaumont, Texas, but enlisted in the United States Marine Corps shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He became one of the elite Marine Raiders. After he returned from the war, Phillips completed the remaining year on his degree at Lamar, and enrolled at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, lettering in football in 1948 and 1949 and graduating with a degree in Education in 1949. During the 1950s and 1960s, Phillips coached high school football in various Texas cities including Jacksonville, Amarillo, Port Neches-Groves, and in his hometown of Nederland. His college coaching stints included serving as an assistant coach at Texas A&M University (for Bear Bryant), the University of Houston (for Bill Yeoman), Southern Methodist University (for Hayden Fry), and Oklahoma State University. He was the head coach at the University of Texas at El Paso for
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Dick Vermeil

    Dick Vermeil

    • Current team head coached:
    Richard Albert "Dick" Vermeil (/vərˈmiːl/; born October 30, 1936) is a former American head coach for the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles (1976–1982), St. Louis Rams (1997–1999) and Kansas City Chiefs (2001–2005). He is in the Sid Gillman coaching tree and has coached at every level; Vermeil owns the distinction of being named “Coach of the Year” on four levels: High School, Junior College, NCAA Division I and Professional Football. In all three of his stops as an NFL head coach, Vermeil has taken every team—Philadelphia, St. Louis and Kansas City, each of which had a losing record before he arrived—and brought them to the playoffs by his third season at the helm. Vermeil graduated in 1959 with an M.A. from San Jose State University, where he was the backup quarterback. After serving as assistant coach for San Jose’s Del Mar High School football team for one season, he became the head coach at Hillsdale High School in nearby San Mateo for two seasons, he then went to Foothill College with coach Bill Walker. During the 1964–65 school year Vermeil was weightlifting coach at College of San Mateo, with his brother as an assistant. The following year he was at Diablo
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Don Shula

    Don Shula

    • Current team head coached:
    Donald Francis "Don" Shula (born January 4, 1930) is a former American football cornerback and coach. He is best known as coach of the Miami Dolphins, the team he led to two Super Bowl victories, and to the National Football League's only perfect season. Shula was named 1993 Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated. He currently holds the NFL record for most career wins with 347. Shula only had two losing seasons in his 36-year career of coaching in the NFL. He has been head coach for a record six Super Bowls. In his first, he set the record for the longest period to be shut out (not scoring until 3:19 remaining). His next Super Bowl he set the record for the lowest points by any team (with only one field goal). The very next year he turned that all around during his perfect season, breaking his record of longest period with a shut out, this time with him on the winning side (not giving up any points until 2:07 remaining). As of 2012, Shula's perfect NFL season remains unmatched, and his three Super Bowl records and total NFL wins remain unbroken. Born in Grand River, Ohio, he has Hungarian origins, Shula grew up in suburban Cleveland, attended St. Mary's and graduated from
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Frank Beamer

    Frank Beamer

    • Current team head coached: Virginia Tech Hokies football
    Frank Beamer (born October 18, 1946) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach at Virginia Tech, a position he has held since 1987. From 1981 to 1986, Beamer served as the head coach at Murray State University. He is currently the winningest active coach and longest tenured coach in Division I FBS. Beamer was born in Mount Airy, North Carolina, grew up in Fancy Gap, Virginia, went to high school in Hillsville, Virginia, and earned 11 varsity letters in high school as a three-sport athlete in football, basketball, and baseball. He then attended Virginia Tech and was a starting cornerback for three years on the football team, playing in the 1966 and 1968 Liberty Bowls. He graduated in 1969 and attended Radford University for graduate school while serving as an assistant football coach at Radford High School. Beamer's college coaching experience began in 1972, when he became a graduate assistant for the University of Maryland, College Park. After one season, he became an assistant coach at The Citadel under Bobby Ross. He spent seven seasons at The Citadel, the last two as the defensive coordinator. He moved on to become the defensive coordinator
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    J. A. Pierce

    J. A. Pierce

    • Current team head coached:
    Joseph Audley Pierce was an American football coach. He served as the first head football coach at the University of Tennessee from 1899–1900, compiling a record of 9–4–1. At the time of his service, there were no assistant coaches, which meant that he had the sole responsibility for coaching the team. During the 1920s, Pierce coached at Corsicana High School in Corsicana, Texas. He was an alumnus of Lafayette University.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Mike Riley

    Mike Riley

    • Current team head coached: Oregon State Beavers football
    Michael Joseph "Mike" Riley (born July 6, 1953) is an American football coach, currently the head coach of the Oregon State Beavers of the Pacific-12 Conference. Riley has also coached in several professional leagues, and is a former head coach of the San Diego Chargers of the NFL and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the CFL. The son of a high school football coach, Riley was born in Wallace, Idaho, and spent his first dozen years in northern Idaho. The family moved from Wallace down to Lewiston in 1959 and up to Moscow in 1962, when his father, Bud Riley, became a collegiate assistant coach for his alma mater, the Idaho Vandals, under new head coach Dee Andros. After three seasons on the Palouse, Andros was hired at Oregon State and Bud Riley joined him in Corvallis in 1965 for eight seasons, first as the secondary coach and later as defensive coordinator. Riley was a hometown hero in Corvallis from his athletic days at Corvallis High, where he led the Spartans as the starting quarterback to consecutive state title games in 1969 and 1970. CHS came up short against Medford in 1969, 27–0, but avenged the loss the following season when they met Medford again and came out victorious
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Ron Prince

    Ron Prince

    • Current team head coached:
    Ron Prince (born September 18, 1969) is an American football coach and current offensive line coach for the Jacksonville Jaguars. From 2006 through 2008, Prince was the head football coach at Kansas State University. He was one of six African-American head coaches in the NCAA Division I-Bowl Subdivision in 2008. He was terminated from his post at the end of the 2008 season. Prince succeeded head coach Bill Snyder at Kansas State following the 2005 season. When he started his first season at Kansas State, in 2006, he was 36 years old and the third-youngest head coach in the Division I-Bowl Subdivision. During the 2006 season, Prince led Kansas State to its first winning record since 2003 with a 7–6 mark, as well as a berth in the inaugural Texas Bowl. The hallmark win of the regular season was a 45–42 upset of then #4 Texas on November 11, 2006. Kansas State lost the 2006 Texas Bowl to #16 Rutgers, 37–10. In Prince's second season, Kansas State slipped to a 5–7 record, including a four-game losing streak to end the year. He also led the Wildcats to their first home loss against Kansas in over a decade. On National Signing Day in February 2008, 19 junior college recruits signed to
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Spike Dykes

    Spike Dykes

    • Current team head coached:
    William Taylor "Spike" Dykes (born March 14, 1938) was the coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team from 1987 to 1999. Dykes was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame on March 11, 2008. Spike Dykes is a 1959 alumnus of Stephen F. Austin State University, where he played center on the Lumberjacks football team. Upon graduation, he served in several high school head and assistant coaching positions, including a stint as defensive coordinator under Emory Bellard at San Angelo Central High School in San Angelo, Texas. In 1972, Dykes became an assistant coach at the University of Texas. He filled assistant roles at two other universities before returning to the high school level to coach at Midland Lee from 1980 to 1983. Dykes was hired to be the head coach at Texas Tech in 1986. He would become the first coach in school history to lead the team to seven straight bowl-eligible seasons and to coach the team in seven bowl games. He was the school's first coach to defeat the Texas Longhorns in six different seasons. He earned three Southwest Conference and one Big 12 Conference Coach of the Year honors. His record at Tech stands at 82–67–1. He is the author of the books
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Steve Spurrier

    Steve Spurrier

    • Current team head coached: South Carolina Gamecocks football
    Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945) is an American college football coach and former player. Spurrier is the current head football coach of the University of South Carolina Gamecocks. He is also a former professional player and coach. Steve Spurrier is a native of Florida who graduated from high school in Tennessee. He is a graduate of the University of Florida, where he played college football for the Florida Gators. Spurrier was a two-time All-American quarterback for the Gators and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1986. He played professional football for ten seasons during the 1960s and 1970s with the San Francisco 49ers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). Spurrier is known for winning the Heisman Trophy in 1966, coaching the Florida Gators football team to six Southeastern Conference (SEC) championships and a consensus national championship in 1996 and, more recently, for elevating the fortunes of the Gamecocks football program at the University of South Carolina. Spurrier attended Science Hill High School in Johnson City, Tennessee, where he was a three-sport letterman starring in high school football,
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    John Harbaugh

    John Harbaugh

    • Current team head coached: Baltimore Ravens
    John Harbaugh (born September 23, 1962) is the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens. Before his assignment with the Ravens, Harbaugh coached the defensive backs for the Philadelphia Eagles and served as the Eagles special teams coach for nine years. Harbaugh and his younger brother, San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, are the first pair of brothers to serve as head coaches in NFL history. Harbaugh graduated from Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during which time his father, Jack, was an assistant under Bo Schembechler at the nearby University of Michigan. He played collegiate football for Miami University, where he was a defensive back. Harbaugh was first hired in the NFL in 1998 by Philadelphia Eagles then-head coach Ray Rhodes, and was one of four assistant coaches retained by new head coach Andy Reid in 1999. Prior to that, Harbaugh spent time in the college ranks as an assistant at Indiana University (1997), University of Cincinnati (1989–1996), Morehead State University (1988), and Western Michigan University (1984–1987). In 2004, Harbaugh was mentioned as a possible candidate to replace Gary Darnell as the head football coach at Western Michigan University.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Kim Helton

    Kim Helton

    • Current team head coached:
    Charles Kimberlin Helton (born July 28, 1948) is an American college and professional football coach. He currently serves as the offensive coordinator for the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) football program. Helton was formerly the head football coach of the University of Houston from 1993 to 1999. Helton was born in Pensacola, Florida. He attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he played center for coach Ray Graves' Florida Gators football team from 1967 to 1969. He graduated from Florida with a bachelor's degree in physical education in 1970. After a year as a graduate assistant at his alma mater, Helton became the offensive line coach under new Gators head coach Doug Dickey, a position he held from 1973 to 1978. In 1979, he was hired by Howard Schnellenberger to serve as the offensive coordinator for the Miami Hurricanes. After Schnellenberger left Miami for the University of Louisville, Helton moved to the National Football League (NFL), becoming offensive line coach under head coaches John McKay and Leeman Bennett with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He later held similar positions with the Houston Oilers and Los Angeles Raiders. In early 1993,
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Galen Hall

    Galen Hall

    • Current team head coached:
    Galen Samuel Hall (born August 14, 1940) is an American college and professional football coach and former player. He is a native of Pennsylvania, and an alumnus of Penn State University, where he played college football. Hall was previously the offensive coordinator at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Florida, and the head coach of the University of Florida, the Orlando Thunder, the Rhein Fire, and the XFL's Orlando Rage. He most recently served as the offensive coordinator at his alma mater, Penn State. Hall was born in Altoona, Pennsylvania in 1940 and grew up in Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. He was raised by his grandparents, following the death of his father several months before he was born. He attended Penn State University in State College, Pennsylvania, where he was the starting quarterback for coach Rip Engle's Nittany Lions in 1960 and 1961. He led the Nittany Lions to a combined 15–6 record and victories in the 1960 Liberty Bowl and 1961 Gator Bowl. Hall was also a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity while a Penn State student. Hall had a short stint as quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) in 1962, during which he appeared in three games with
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    John J. Tigert

    John J. Tigert

    • Current team head coached:
    John James Tigert, IV (February 11, 1882 – January 21, 1965) was an American university president, university professor and administrator, college sports coach and the U.S. Commissioner of Education. Tigert was a native of Tennessee and the son and grandson of Methodist bishops. After receiving his bachelor's degree, he earned his master's degree as a Rhodes Scholar. After completing his education, Tigert taught at Central College; served as the president of Kentucky Wesleyan College; and worked as a professor, sports coach and administrator at the University of Kentucky. Tigert gained his greatest national prominence as the U.S. Commissioner of Education from 1921 to 1928, and the third president of the University of Florida, from 1928 to 1947. He is remembered as a forceful advocate for the improvement of American public education, intercollegiate sports and university curriculum reform. Tigert was born in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1882, the third son of a Methodist Episcopal minister, John James Tigert, III, and his wife, Amelia McTyeire Tigert. Tigert received his primary education in the public schools of Kansas City, Missouri, and Nashville, and earned his high school diploma,
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Tommy Mont

    Tommy Mont

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas Allison "Tommy" Mont (June 20, 1922 – January 1, 2012) was an American educator, university administrator, college football coach, and NFL player. He played quarterback for the Washington Redskins as a back-up behind Sammy Baugh for three seasons. Mont served as the head football coach for three years at the University of Maryland and for eighteen years at DePauw University. He also served as the DePauw athletic director for fifteen years. Mont was born in Mount Savage, Maryland in 1922. He attended Allegany High School in Cumberland, Maryland where he played football as a quarterback. In 1939, he led the team to the city championship. Mont attended the University of Maryland where he played football as a quarterback in 1941 and 1942. In 1942, Clark Shaughnessy took over as Maryland head coach. In 1940 and 1941, Shaughnessy had coached at Stanford. There he installed a pass-oriented version of the T-formation and, in his first year, engineered a turnaround from a 1–7–1 record to a perfect 10–0 season and Pacific Coast Conference championship. While Maryland's head coach, Shaughnessy also worked concurrently as an advisor for the Washington Redskins, with that club and
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Brian Billick

    Brian Billick

    • Current team head coached:
    Brian Harold Billick (born February 28, 1954) is a National Football League game analyst for Fox, and is also an analyst for the network's Bowl Championship Series coverage. He was previously an NFL coach, most recently with the Baltimore Ravens from January 19, 1999 to December 31, 2007. Billick led the Ravens to a 34–7 victory over the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXXV, the franchise's only Super Bowl appearance. He was also notable for being the offensive coordinator for the Minnesota Vikings (1992–1998) when they broke the then scoring record in the 1998 season. Billick, who played football and basketball at Redlands High School in Redlands, California, had his No. 17 jersey retired by the school in March 2001. He played both quarterback and cornerback in high school and holds the state record with 21 career interceptions. After spending his freshman season as a linebacker at the United States Air Force Academy, Billick transferred to Brigham Young University and became a tight end. He later told friends that he left the Air Force Academy because he learned, after he'd already enrolled, that his height and size (6-foot-5, 230 lb.) precluded him from ever becoming a fighter
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Dave Allerdice

    Dave Allerdice

    • Current team head coached:
    David Way Allerdice (March 26, 1887 – December 31, 1941) was an American football player and coach. He played football for the University of Michigan from 1907 to 1909 and coached football at Butler University (1910) and the University of Texas at Austin (1911–1915). Allerdice was born in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1887. He enrolled at the University of Michigan and played at the right halfback position for coach Fielding H. Yost's Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1907 to 1909. Allerdice played on offense and defense for Michigan, and he also handled place-kicking and punting responsibilities. He was Michigan's leading scorer in 1908 with 64 points in seven games, and again in 1909 with 51 points in seven games. In 1908, he scored all of Michigan's points a 12–6 win over Notre Dame and a 10–6 win over Ohio State. He scored a career-high 19 points (two touchdowns, six extra points, and a field goal) in a 1909 victory over Syracuse. Allerdice won praise from the press for playing through injuries, playing the 1908 Penn game with a broken collarbone and the 1909 Penn game with a broken hand. Allerdice served as captain of the 1909 Michigan football team that compiled a record of
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Duane Akina

    Duane Akina

    • Current team head coached:
    Duane Akina (born c. 1958) is the assistant head coach and defensive backs coach for the Texas Longhorns football team. In 28 years of coaching football, Akina has coached three Thorpe Award winners in Darryll Lewis (1990), Michael Huff (2005), and Aaron Ross (2006), as well as five finalists for the award, among them Chris McAlister. Twenty of his defensive backs have also gone on to play in the NFL. He was an assistant coach to Dick Tomey at the University of Arizona for 14 years, serving as defensive backs coach and offensive coordinator. He was named Arizona defensive coordinator in 2000, but decided to leave for Texas to become the team's defensive back coach. Akina was promoted to co-defensive coordinator and retained his duties as defensive backs coach for the Longhorns from 2005-2007. In the 2007 season, he shared the defensive coordinator position with Larry Mac Duff, but called the defensive plays. After a frustrating season, in which the Longhorns defense allowed a school-record 4,498 total yards, Akina could have faced dismissal following the 2007 Holiday Bowl. However, not Akina, but Larry Mac Duff resigned. Akina was nonetheless demoted to secondary coach after Will
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Elton Wieman

    Elton Wieman

    • Current team head coached:
    Elton Ewart "Tad" Wieman (October 4, 1896 – December 26, 1971) was an American football player and coach and college athletic director. He played football for the University of Michigan from 1915 to 1917 and 1920 under head coach Fielding H. Yost. He was a coach and administrator at Michigan from 1921 to 1929, including two years as the school's head football coach. He later served as a football coach at the University of Minnesota (1930–1932), Princeton University (1932–1941), and Columbia University (1944–1945), and as an athletic director at the University of Maine (1946–1951) and University of Denver (1951–1962). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1956. Wieman was born in Tulare County, California, and raised in Los Angeles. His father, William H. Wieman, was a native of Missouri and a Presbyterian minister. Wieman was the seventh of eight children born to William and his wife Alma. At the time of the 1900 United States Census, the family lived in Orosi, California. By 1910, the family had moved to Los Angeles, California. At Los Angeles High School, Wieman followed in the footsteps of four older brothers, Henry, "Ink," Drury and "Tabby" Wieman. All had
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Emmons Dunbar

    Emmons Dunbar

    • Current team head coached:
    Emmons Burdette Dunbar (March 24, 1882 – July 20, 1954) was an American agriculturalist and college football coach. He served as head coach of the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in 1901. Dunbar was born in Springville, New York in 1882. As a youth, he was tutored by fellow Springville native and legendary coach Glenn "Pop" Warner in the intricacies of the unbalanced line used to great effect by the Carlisle Indians. In 1900, Dunbar enrolled in the Maryland Agricultural College, where he played on the football team as a guard from 1900 to 1902. The team elected him as captain in 1902, but he broke his leg in the second game against Mount Saint Joseph College. Dunbar graduated from the Maryland Agricultural College in 1903 with a Bachelor's Degree from the Agricultural Course. He married in 1910 and worked as an agronomist for the I. A. Corporation in Buffalo, New York. Dunbar was a member of the Freemasons.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Joe Glenn

    Joe Glenn

    • Current team head coached:
    Joe Glenn (born March 7, 1949) is an American football coach and former player. He is the current head football coach at the University of South Dakota, his alma mater. He was named head coach on December 5, 2011 after the school's athletic director, David Sayler, fired Ed Meierkort. Glenn served as the head football coach at Doane College (1976–1979), the University of Northern Colorado (1989–1999), the University of Montana (2000–2002), and the University of Wyoming (2003–2008). He won two NCAA Division II National Football Championships at Northern Colorado, in 1996 and 1997, and an NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship at Montana in 2001. Glenn served as backfield coach at the University of South Dakota in 1974. He was also a backfield coach at Northern Arizona University in 1975. Glenn's first head coaching job was at Doane College in Crete, Nebraska. There he was the youngest head college football coach at 27 years of age. While at Doane he compiled a 21–18–1 record over four seasons. After Doane, Glenn made his first stint at the University of Montana as a quarterbacks and wide receivers coach and offensive coordinator from 1980 to 1985. He was out of coaching in 1986. In
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Ron Turner

    Ron Turner

    • Current team head coached:
    Ron Turner (born December 5, 1953) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the quarterbacks coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL), a position he assumed in March 2012. Turner served as the head football coach at San Jose State University in 1992, and the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1997 to 2004, compiling a career college football record of 42–61. Turner also had two separate stints as the offensive coordinator for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL), the first from 1993–1996, and most recently from 2005–2009. Turner played college football as a wide receiver for Diablo Valley College from 1973–1974, and the University of the Pacific from 1975–1976. He was inducted into the school’s athletic Hall of Fame in 2009. He earned a scholarship to the University of the Pacific, where he led the Tigers in receiving in 1975 and 1976 and totaled 40 receptions for 666 yards with three touchdowns. Turner began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Pacific before earning his first full-time college job coaching running backs and receivers at University of Arizona (1978–1980). He moved on
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Gary Patterson

    Gary Patterson

    • Current team head coached: TCU Horned Frogs football
    Gary Patterson (born February 13, 1960) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Texas Christian University (TCU), a position he has held since the end of the 2000 season. Patterson has led the TCU Horned Frogs to five conference championships—the Conference USA title in 2002 and four Mountain West Conference titles (including three consecutive from 2009 to 2011)—and seven bowl wins including a victory in the 2011 Rose Bowl. His 2010 squad finished the season undefeated at 13–0 after the Rose Bowl win on New Year's Day 2011, and ranked second in the final tallying of both major polls. Paterson grew up in Rozel, Kansas and played football at Dodge City Community College and at Kansas State University. Patterson is married to Kelsey Patterson (née Hayes). He has three sons: Josh, Cade and Blake. He received his bachelor's degree in physical education in 1983 from Kansas State University, where he became a member of the Acacia Fraternity. While coaching at Tennessee Technological University he earned a master's degree in educational administration in 1984. Outside of coaching, Patterson plays guitar and performs at charity events
    4.33
    3 votes
    208
    Kevin Bloody Wilson

    Kevin Bloody Wilson

    • Current team head coached:
    Kevin Bloody Wilson (born Dennis Bryant on 13 February 1947 in Sydney, Australia) is a comedy singer/songwriter who uses his heavy Australian accent/style with great success. Without the aid of radio or TV coverage (due to the explicit, crude and sexual nature of his songs and general humour), he has built up a widespread cult following. Bryant was born in Sydney, New South Wales, although he identifies himself with Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, where he was an electrician in the gold mines. In the 1970s Bryant fronted his own band called 'Bryan Dennis and the Country Club'. He also used the name 'Bryan Dennis' when he hosted a country music show on 6KG in Kalgoorlie from 1973 to 1980, before he was thrown off air for playing the parody song, "I'm Heaving On A Jet Plane". He moved to Perth and began playing bawdy songs as a hobby, singing at pubs and football clubs. In 1984 he put together a cassette of his songs called Your Average Australian Yobbo, which he sold at gigs and by mail order. He managed to sell 22,000 copies of the cassette before it was eventually transferred to LP, where it went on to sell many thousands more. He is notable as Perth's most famous comedian. His
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    Charlie Ward

    Charlie Ward

    • Current team head coached:
    Charlie Ward, Jr. (born October 12, 1970) is a retired American professional NBA basketball player, college football Heisman Trophy winner, Davey O'Brien Award winner and a Major League Baseball draftee. Ward is considered one of the best all-around athletes in the last quarter century. He was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame with Emmitt Smith and Bobby Bowden in 2006. Ward won the 1993 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and Davey O'Brien Award as a quarterback for Florida State University, and subsequently led the Seminoles to their first-ever National Championship when FSU defeated Nebraska 18–16 in the 1993 Orange Bowl. The Seminoles had suffered their only defeat of the season to a second-ranked Notre Dame team, but their path to the National Championship was cleared a week later when the Irish were upset at home by Boston College. Ward holds the second-largest margin of victory in the history of Heisman trophy balloting, with a 1,622 point difference, second only to O.J. Simpson's 1,750 point win in 1968. He was also the only Heisman winner to play in the NBA. In 1993, Charlie Ward won the James E. Sullivan Award from the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) as the most
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Dan McGugin

    Dan McGugin

    • Current team head coached:
    Daniel Earle McGugin (July 29, 1879 – January 23, 1936) was an American football player, coach, and lawyer. He served as the head football coach at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee from 1904 to 1917 and again from 1919 to 1934, compiling a record of 197–55–19. He played college football at the University of Michigan. McGugin was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951. McGugin was born in July 1879 on a farm near Tingley, Iowa. He was the son of Benjamin Franklin McGugin (1843–1925) and Melissa (Critchfield) McGugin (1845–1915). McGugin enrolled at Drake University and received a bachelor of arts degree in 1901. He played football at Drake for two years. He played at the tackle and guard positions for Drake and "was considered one of the best players that Drake ever had." After graduating from Drake, McGugin enrolled in law school at the University of Michigan. While at Michigan, McGugin played college football for Fielding H. Yost. He was a player on Michigan's "Point-a-Minute" teams that outscored their opponents, 1,211 to 12 in 1901 and 1902, and served as Yost's assistant coach at Michigan in 1903. A profile of McGugin in the 1903
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Jim Harbaugh

    Jim Harbaugh

    • Current team head coached: San Francisco 49ers
    James Joseph "Jim" Harbaugh (/ˈhɑrbɔː/; born December 23, 1963) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head coach for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League. Harbaugh agreed to a five-year deal with the San Francisco 49ers on January 7, 2011. Previously, he was the head coach at Stanford University for four seasons and the University of San Diego for three seasons. Harbaugh is also a former NFL quarterback who played for the Chicago Bears, Indianapolis Colts, Baltimore Ravens, and San Diego Chargers. He was selected by the Bears with the 26th pick in the first round of the 1987 NFL Draft. He played college football at Michigan. Harbaugh and his older brother, Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh, are the first pair of brothers to serve as head coaches in NFL history. Harbaugh's father was an assistant coach at Michigan under Bo Schembechler for seven seasons during the 1970s. Jim played for the junior league Ann Arbor Packers, then for Tappan Junior High, and attended Pioneer High School. When his father became defensive coordinator at Stanford for the 1980 season, Jim transferred to Palo Alto High School in California, where he
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Sam Rutigliano

    Sam Rutigliano

    • Current team head coached:
    Sam Rutigliano (born July 1, 1933) is a former National Football League head coach. Rutigliano, the son of Italian immigrants, played high school football at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn. He played college football at Tennessee and Tulsa. He coached at the high school level in New York. This included a stint at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, NY where he tried to change the school's nickname from "Quakers" to the more masculine sounding "Falcons". He then coached at the college level at Connecticut, Maryland and Tennessee before landing a professional football assistant coaching job with the American Football League's Denver Broncos in 1967. He would be an assistant with the New England Patriots, New York Jets, and New Orleans Saints over the next 11 years before being given the head coaching job for the Cleveland Browns in 1978. Over the next six years, Rutigliano was the coach of the famed "Kardiac Kids" Browns. He led the 1980 Browns to the AFC Central Division Championship. The final play of the Browns' playoff game with the Oakland Raiders would be the most memorable moment in Rutigliano's coaching career. Down 14–12 and within field goal range, Rutigliano
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Dave Wannstedt

    Dave Wannstedt

    • Current team head coached:
    Dave Wannstedt (born May 21, 1952) is the defensive coordinator for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL). He was the head coach of the University of Pittsburgh football team, a position he held for six seasons from 2005–2010. Wannstedt is also the former head coach of the Miami Dolphins and Chicago Bears of the NFL. He also was a long-time assistant to Jimmy Johnson with the Dallas Cowboys, Miami Hurricanes, and Oklahoma State Cowboys as well as an associate of Johnson when both were assistants at the University of Pittsburgh in the 1970s. Wannstedt was born in Baldwin, Pennsylvania and attended Baldwin High School. He earned an athletic scholarship to the University of Pittsburgh playing offensive tackle and blocking for future Heisman Trophy winner Tony Dorsett. After a successful career with the Panthers, he was chosen in the fifteenth round of the 1974 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers, but spent his only NFL season on the injured reserve list with a neck injury. In 1975, Pitt coach Johnny Majors hired him as a graduate assistant coach. He was on the staff when the Panthers won the 1976 NCAA Division I-A national football championship with a victory over the
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    C. A. Lueder

    C. A. Lueder

    • Current team head coached:
    Charles Augustus Lueder was an American head coach in both rowing and college football. He was a native of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, and was known as a talented athlete while attending Cornell University. Lueder graduated from Cornell University with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 1902. He was one of the first students to excel in three varsity sports there, competing under three legendary coaches: football under Glenn Scobey Warner, track under Jack Moakley, and crew under Charles E. Courtney. His undergraduate success led to his membership in the Quill and Dagger society. Lueder was at that time considered one of the strongest athletes Cornell had ever developed. In 1901, Lueder was part of Cornell’s world-record-setting varsity eight at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championship Regatta in Poughkeepsie, New York. This crew broke the world record for a four-mile course with a time of 18 minutes, 53⅓ seconds. In 1956 he was an inaugural inductee into the National Rowing Hall of Fame. After graduation, Lueder served as head coach of the Virginia Tech football team. Lueder was also approached by Syracuse University to coach their football team. He went to Syracuse to
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Mike Gundy

    Mike Gundy

    • Current team head coached: Oklahoma State Cowboys football
    Mike Gundy (born August 12, 1967) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Oklahoma State University–Stillwater. Gundy played college football at Oklahoma State, where he played quarterback from 1986 to 1989. Gundy became Oklahoma State's coach on January 3, 2005. In 2007 he received national media attention for his heated criticism of a newspaper article on one of his players. At Midwest City High School, Gundy played quarterback, and was voted Oklahoma Player of the Year in 1986. Gundy was heavily recruited by the Oklahoma Sooners but in the end signed with the Oklahoma State University Cowboys. He became the starting quarterback midway through his freshman year. Gundy would become the all-time leading passer in Oklahoma State and Big 8 Conference history. In four seasons Gundy threw 49 touchdowns and 7,997 yards, including 2,106 yards in 1987 and 2,163 in 1988. He led the Cowboys to bowl wins in the 1987 Sun Bowl and 1988 Holiday Bowl aided by two Hall of Fame running backs, Thurman Thomas and Barry Sanders. He also led OSU to two 10-win seasons. Mike Gundy held the record for most consecutive passes attempted without an
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Ralph Friedgen

    Ralph Friedgen

    • Current team head coached:
    Ralph Harry Friedgen (born April 4, 1947) is an American football coach. He was the head coach at the University of Maryland from 2000 to 2010. Affectionately known as "The Fridge", Friedgen was previously an offensive coordinator at Maryland, Georgia Tech, and in the National Football League with the San Diego Chargers. After the 2010 regular season, it was announced that Friedgen would not be returning for the 2011 season, ending his ten year run as head coach. Friedgen was born on April 4, 1947 in Harrison, New York. His father, "Big Ralph" Friedgen, attended Fordham University, where he played from 1938 to 1939, and coached high school football for 30 years. The younger Friedgen worked under his father as a water boy and manager, and the two often attended New York Giants and Jets games together. He attended Harrison High School where he played quarterback on his father's team. John Nugent, the head coach of Harrison's rival Rye High School, recommended that his brother, Maryland head coach Tom Nugent, recruit Friedgen. His recruitment was handled by Lee Corso, then an assistant coach at the school. After his first season at Maryland, Nugent was fired as head coach, and his
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Roy Lester

    Roy Lester

    • Current team head coached:
    E. Roy Lester (born c. 1923) is an American former college and high school football coach. After a successful career at the high school level, he served as the head coach of the University of Maryland football team from 1969 to 1971. Lester was the school's fourth head coach in five years, and compiled a 7–25 record during his tenure. He was fired after the 1971 season when Maryland finished at the bottom of the Atlantic Coast Conference for the second consecutive year. Lester returned to coach interscholastic football, including as head coach of Richard Montgomery High School where his teams compiled an 86–10–1 record and six undefeated seasons. His high school teams won three Maryland state championships. Lester attended West Virginia University where he was a three-sport athlete and earned letters in football, baseball, and basketball. He was inducted into the West Virginia University Sports Hall of Fame in 2008. Lester grew up in Spencer, West Virginia and attended college at West Virginia University, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball. In basketball, he played as a center and recorded 27 points in 21 games during his career. In baseball, he played as an
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Will Skinner

    Will Skinner

    • Current team head coached:
    William Woolford Skinner (March 28, 1874 – March 10, 1953) was an American chemist, conservationist, and college football coach. He served as the head coach at the Maryland Agricultural College (now University of Maryland) and University of Arizona. Skinner was born in Baltimore on March 28, 1874, and raised in Cambridge, Maryland. He enrolled at the Maryland Agricultural College in 1891. In 1892, he became the football team's first quarterback and head coach. During that inaugural season, Maryland went scoreless to finish with a 0–3 record. In 1894, he was instrumental in the formation of the Maryland Intercollegiate Football Association, which was created to award the state football championship. In 1895, Skinner graduated from the MAC as the valedictorian. He earned a B.S. through its "Agricultural-Scientific" course. Upon graduation, Skinner took a job at his alma mater as an assistant chemist, and enrolled in graduate school at Columbian University (now the George Washington University) in 1896. He graduated with an M.S. from Columbian in 1898. In 1899, Skinner married Georgia née Mitchell, with whom he later had a daughter. From 1899 to 1901, he served in an assistant chemist
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    William Henry Dietz

    William Henry Dietz

    • Current team head coached:
    William Henry "Lone Star" Dietz (August 17, 1884 – July 20, 1964) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Washington State University (1915–1917), Purdue University (1921), Louisiana Tech University (1922–1923), University of Wyoming (1924–1926), and Albright College (1937–1942) compiling a career college football record of 70–47–6. From 1933 to 1934, Dietz was the head coach of the National Football League's Boston Redskins, where he tallied a mark of 11–11–2. Dietz played at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, a teammate of Jim Thorpe, under famed coach Pop Warner. Dietz was the 14th head college football coach for the Washington State University Cougars located in Pullman, Washington, a position he held for three seasons, from 1915 until 1917. His coaching record at Washington State was 17 wins, 2 losses, and 1 tie. As of the conclusion of the 2007 season, this ranks him eighth at Washington State in total wins and third at Washington State in winning percentage (.875). He also led Washington State to its only Rose Bowl win in 1916. Dietz also coached at Purdue University, the University of Wyoming,
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Allen Steckle

    Allen Steckle

    • Current team head coached:
    Allen Chubb "A. C." Steckle (July 1872 – March 5, 1938) was an American football player and coach. He played tackle for the University of Michigan from 1897–1899 and later served as the head football coach at the University of Nevada and Oregon State University, then known as Oregon Agricultural College. Steckle was selected as an All-American in 1898 and achieved fame in 1903 when his Nevada Sagebrush team, drawn from a school with 80 students, defeated the University of California football team. Steckle was born in July 1872 at Freeport, Michigan. His father, Abraham B. Steckle, was born in Waterloo Township, Ontario, Canada, in 1842, and worked as a farmer. His mother, Sarah (Furtney) Steckle, was also a native of Waterloo Township. His parents were married in December 1867 in Waterloo County, Ontario. At the time of the 1880 United States Census, Steckle was residing with his parents and six siblings in Campbell Township, Michigan. Steckle played football for the University of Michigan from 1897 to 1899 and was captain of the 1899 team. In 1898, Steckle was among the first western players to be named to an All-American team after being selected by Walter Camp as his second-team
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Amos Foster

    Amos Foster

    • Current team head coached:
    Amos Parker Foster (March 10, 1880 – August 7, 1952) was an American football and basketball player and coach in the early 1900s. He was a 1904 graduate of Dartmouth College where he lettered in both basketball and football. Foster served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati (1904–1905), the University of Nebraska (1906), and Miami University (1907–1908), compiling a career college football mark of 30–9. He was also the head basketball coach at Cincinnati for five seasons from 1904 to 1909, tallying a mark of 30–10. After coaching he practiced law in Ohio. Foster was born on March 10, 1880 in Keene, New Hampshire. He graduated from Cushing Academy in 1899, where he had played on several athletic teams. He spent the next year doing college preparatory work at Cushing and was a member of the graduate basketball team, which was named All-New England champion after winning in a tournament of 35 top teams. Foster lettered in football in 1902 and 1903 for Dartmouth. He helped the 1903 team coached by Fred Folsom to a 9–1 record including the school's first-ever win over Harvard. Many of the Eastern writers named him to their All-American team for his success his
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Bill Yeoman

    Bill Yeoman

    • Current team head coached:
    Bill Yeoman (born December 26, 1927) is a former American football player and coach. Starting in 1962, he was the University of Houston's head coach, holding the position through 1986. In his tenure, he became the winningest coach in school history, with an overall record of 160–108–8. Yeoman revolutionized offensive football in 1964 by developing the Veer option offense. Yeoman also played a prominent role in the racial integration of collegiate athletics in the South by being the first coach at a predominantly white school in the State of Texas to sign a black player. Yeoman's Cougars finished the season ranked in the AP Top 10 four times and finished 11 times in the AP or UPI Top 20. Yeoman played center for Army from 1946 to 1948 under legendary head coach Earl Blaik. The 1946 team was 9–0–1 with a backfield of two Heisman Trophy winners: Glenn Davis and Doc Blanchard. Yeoman was a team captain in 1948 and chosen as a second team All-American. The Army football teams in which he played compiled a combined 22–2–4 record. Bill Yeoman is still the only underclassman to ever captain an Army team. From 1950 to 1953, Yeoman served in the United States Army. After his return from the
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Dan Hawkins

    Dan Hawkins

    • Current team head coached:
    Dan Hawkins (born November 10, 1960) is a sportscaster and former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Willamette University, Boise State University, and the University of Colorado at Boulder, compiling a career college football record of 112–61–1. Hawkins is currently a studio analyst for college football with ESPN. Hawkins grew up in tiny Bieber, California, in the northeast corner of the state. He attended junior college at College of the Siskiyous in Weed and transferred to UC Davis, where he played fullback, and earned a bachelor's degree in physical education in 1984. He later completed a master’s degree in educational administration from St. Mary's College in 1993. He began his coaching career at UC Davis under coach Jim Sochor the fall before he graduated, spending three years there (1983–1985). He then served as head coach at Christian Brothers High School in Sacramento for the 1986 and 1987 seasons. He spent four seasons (1988–1991) as the offensive coordinator at the College of the Siskiyous, then served as defensive coordinator at Sonoma State in 1992. In 1993, Hawkins became the head coach at Willamette University in Salem,
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    George O'Leary

    George O'Leary

    • Current team head coached: UCF Golden Knights football
    George Joseph O'Leary (born August 17, 1946) is an American football coach, currently serving as the head football coach at the University of Central Florida. He has served as the head coach of the UCF Knights since 2004. O'Leary previously coached the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets from 1994 to 2001, and served as an assistant coach for the Minnesota Vikings from 2002 to 2004. O'Leary is widely known for his success with the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, his brief tenure as head coach for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, and for coaching the UCF Knights to the fourth-best turnaround in NCAA history in his second year with the team. George O'Leary was born on August 17, 1946 in Central Islip, New York. O'Leary is married to Sharon O'Leary and they have four children; two daughters, Chris and Trish, and two sons, Tim and Marty. Marty was a senior free safety on the 2001 Georgia Tech team that his father coached. O'Leary earned a Bachelor's of Science degree in physical education from the University of New Hampshire, where he graduated in 1968. He began his coaching career at Central Islip High School in New York, serving as their assistant coach from 1968-1974. From 1975-1976 he served as
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Johnny Poe

    Johnny Poe

    • Current team head coached:
    John P. "Johnny" Poe, Jr. (26 February 1874 – 25 September 1915) was an American college football player and coach, soldier, Marine, and soldier of fortune, whose exploits on the gridiron and the battlefield contributed to the lore and traditions of the Princeton Tigers football program. John Prentiss Poe, Jr., known as "Johnny", was born 26 February 1874 in Baltimore, Maryland, to John P. Poe, Sr., and Anne Johnson Hough. He was the third of six sons in a family that also included three daughters. John Sr. was a prominent attorney, and relative of the American writer and poet, Edgar Allan Poe. John Sr. was an 1856 graduate of Princeton University and would later serve as Attorney General of Maryland. Anne Hough was from a Maryland family who supported the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Her nephew, Bradley T. Johnson served as a Confederate general, and her brother, Gresham Hough, fought with Mosby's raiders. All six Poe brothers wound up playing football for Princeton. The oldest, S. Johnson Poe, played halfback and also played on Princeton's national champion lacrosse team. The second son, Edgar A. Poe, was captain of the football team, and later served as Attorney
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Mark Mangino

    Mark Mangino

    • Current team head coached:
    Mark Thomas Mangino (August 26, 1956) is an American football coach. He was most recently the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks college football team from 2002 to 2009. In 2007, Mangino received several National Coach of the Year honors after leading the Jayhawks to their first 12-win season in school history. Prior to coaching the Jayhawks, Mangino served assistant positions at Kansas State and Oklahoma . On December 3, 2009, after allegations of verbal and physical player abuse, Mangino and the Jayhawks agreed on a settlement in which he resigned from his position as head coach. Mangino was born and raised in New Castle, Pennsylvania. After high school, he was offered a football scholarship at Youngstown State. Mangino played semi-pro baseball in western Pennsylvania until he became an EMT. In his late 20's he returned to Youngstown State to receive his degree. Mangino graduated from Youngstown State University in 1987, serving as an assistant coach there in his last two years under then-head coach Jim Tressel. He also coached at Lincoln High School in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania and at Geneva College, before being hired as an assistant coach at Kansas State University in 1991.
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Paul Johnson

    Paul Johnson

    • Current team head coached: Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football
    Paul Johnson (born August 20, 1957) is an American football coach. He is currently the head coach at the Georgia Institute of Technology, a position he has held since the 2008 season. Previously, Johnson served as the head coach at Georgia Southern University from 1997 to 2001 and at the United States Naval Academy from 2002 to 2007. Johnson's Georgia Southern Eagles won consecutive NCAA Division I-AA Football Championships in 1999 and 2000. He is noted for his use of the triple option style of offense. Johnson has performed well against rivals, including a perfect 6–0 mark against rival Army while head coach at Navy and a 1–3 record against rival Georgia while head coach at Georgia Tech. Johnson earned his Bachelor of Science in physical education from Western Carolina University in 1979, where he was a member of the Kappa Alpha Order. He did not play college football. He also earned a Master of Science in health and physical education from Appalachian State University in 1982. Johnson was initially an assistant football coach at Avery County High School in Newland, North Carolina, and then spent eight seasons as offensive coordinator at the University of Hawaii at Manoa from 1987
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Scott Shafer

    Scott Shafer

    • Current team head coached:
    Scott Shafer (born 1967) is an American football coach who is currently the defensive coordinator for the Syracuse University football team. He was a high school and college quarterback in Ohio at Riverside High School, Ohio University, and Baldwin-Wallace College. He has held various positions including defensive coordinator, assistant head coach, and secondary coach at major universities such as the University of Rhode Island, Northern Illinois University, the University of Illinois, Western Michigan University, Stanford University, University of Michigan, and Syracuse University. Shafer's father Ron was a high school football and track coach at Riverside High School in Painesville, Ohio. His father ultimately died at age 53 after coaching 28 years at Riverside High. As an Ohio native, Shafer attended school in Painesville, Ohio where he received his high school diploma in 1985. He attended Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio where he received his Bachelor's Degree in Education in 1990. He went on to study at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana where he was awarded a Master's Degree in Education in 1993. Shafer played football for Riverside High School, Ohio University,
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Sean Payton

    Sean Payton

    • Current team head coached: New Orleans Saints
    Patrick Sean Payton (born December 29, 1963) is an American head coach for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League. Payton was a quarterback at Naperville Central High School and Eastern Illinois University and played professionally in 1987 and 1988. He began his coaching career as offensive assistant for San Diego State University and had several assistant coaching positions in collegiate and NFL teams before being named as the 10th full-time coach in Saints history in 2006. Under Payton, the New Orleans Saints made the 2006 NFL playoffs after a 3–13 season in 2005, and Payton won the AP NFL Coach of the Year Award because of this effort. Following the 2009 season, the New Orleans Saints won the Super Bowl championship. On March 21, 2012, Payton was suspended for the entire 2012 NFL season, originally set to take effect April 1, 2012, as a result of his alleged involvement in the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal, under which "bounties" were allegedly paid for contact that would "knock out" targeted players on opposing teams. Payton has denied that any program encouraging Saints players to injure opposing players ever existed, even though the NFL claims their
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Tim Murphy

    Tim Murphy

    • Current team head coached:
    Tim Murphy (born October 9, 1956) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Harvard University, a position he has held since the 1994 season. Murphy served as the head coach at the University of Maine from 1987 to 1988 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1989 to 1993. Under his guidance, the Harvard Crimson have had ten consecutive winning seasons. Murphy's 120 wins at Harvard are the most in the program's history. His 2004 squad went 10–0 and was the only undefeated team in Division I-AA that season. In 2012, Murphy was elected president of the American Football Coaches Association.
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    Wayne Fontes

    Wayne Fontes

    • Current team head coached:
    Wayne Fontes (born February 2, 1940) is a former American football coach and college and professional football player who was the head coach of the NFL's Detroit Lions from 1988 to 1996. His 67 wins and 71 losses are each the most for a head coach in team history. Fontes was born in the fishing community of New Bedford, Massachusetts. According to the 1930 US Census, his mother, Matilda Fontes, was born in Central Falls, Rhode Island. His father, Caetano Fontes, was born in Cape Verde, a Portuguese colony at the time. Fontes grew up in Canton, Ohio where he played football at McKinley High School. He attended Michigan State University and graduated in 1962. After he was taken in the ninth round of the 1961 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles, Fontes played one year for the New York Titans of the American Football League. Fontes played nine games for the Titans in the 1962 season as a defensive back, recording four interceptions. He returned one interception 83 yards for a touchdown, a franchise record that would stand for 27 years. After playing one season for the Titans, he injured his posterior cruciate ligament, he returned to MSU to obtain a Master's degree. He became an
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Bear Bryant

    Bear Bryant

    • Current team head coached:
    Paul William "Bear" Bryant (September 11, 1913 – January 26, 1983) was an American college football player and coach. He was best known as the longtime head coach of the University of Alabama football team. During his 25-year tenure as Alabama's head coach, he amassed six national championships and thirteen conference championships. Upon his retirement in 1982, he held the record for most wins as head coach in collegiate football history with 323 wins. At the University of Alabama, the Paul W. Bryant Museum, Paul W. Bryant Hall, Paul W. Bryant Drive and Bryant–Denny Stadium are all named in his honor. He was also known for his trademark black and white houndstooth or gingham hat, deep voice, casually leaning up against the goal post during pre-game warmups, and frequently holding his rolled-up game plan while on the sidelines. Before arriving at Alabama, Bryant was head football coach at the University of Maryland, the University of Kentucky, and Texas A&M University. Paul Bryant was the 11th of 12 children who were born to William Monroe and Ida Kilgore Bryant in Fordyce, Arkansas. His nickname stemmed from his having agreed to wrestle a captive bear during a theater promotion
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    233
    Billy Brewer

    Billy Brewer

    • Current team head coached:
    Billy Brewer (born October 8, 1935) is a former head football coach for Southeastern Louisiana University, Louisiana Tech University and University of Mississippi. He is the current host of an Ole Miss Rebel football post-game call-in show. A native of Columbus, Mississippi, Brewer first came to Ole Miss as a player for the legendary Rebel teams of Johnny Vaught. He played quarterback, defensive back, punted and held for placekickers from 1957 to 1960, and Ole Miss named him to its "Team of the Century" in 1993. After a brief professional career, Brewer went into college coaching. He coached defensive backs the Southeastern Louisiana University Lions located in Hammond, Louisiana from 1972 to 1973. In 1974, Brewer was named the tenth head coach at SLU and he coached for six seasons, from 1974 to 1979. His coaching record at Southeastern Louisiana was 38 wins, 24 losses, and 2 ties. As of the conclusion of the 2007 season, this ranks him third at Southeastern Louisiana in total wins and third at Southeastern Louisiana in winning percentage (.609). Brewer was head coach at Louisiana Tech from 1980 through 1982, posting a record of 19 wins, 15 losses and a tie. His last season at Tech
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    234
    Bob Ward

    Bob Ward

    • Current team head coached:
    Bob Ward has served as policy and communications director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics since 2008. He worked at the Royal Society, where he headed the media team, for eight years until 2006. In 2009 he commented on the Climatic Research Unit email controversy, saying that "The politicians won't be swayed by this. It's basic physics that the world is being warmed by greenhouse gases, and politicians can see through the sceptics' arguments." He supported calls for an independent investigation into the controversy but believed the emails did not reveal evidence of wrongdoing. He also commented on how climate change denial had been adopted as a political cause by the far right. In 2010 he expressed concern over reports that some Fellows of the Royal Society disagreed with the Society's official policy on "Preventing dangerous climate change" as stated in December 2009. In a letter to The Times and in an Op-Ed in The Guardian he urged the Royal Society to clarify its stance on global warming.
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    235
    Bud Wilkinson

    Bud Wilkinson

    • Current team head coached:
    Charles Burnham "Bud" Wilkinson (April 23, 1916 – February 9, 1994) was an American football player, coach, broadcaster, and politician. He served as the head football coach at the University of Oklahoma from 1947 to 1963, compiling a record of 145–29–4. His Oklahoma Sooners won three national championships (1950, 1955, and 1956) and 14 conference titles. Between 1953 and 1957, Wilkinson's Oklahoma squads won 47 straight games, a record that still stands at the highest level of college football. After retiring from coaching following the 1963 season, Wilkinson entered into politics and, in 1965, became a broadcaster with ABC Sports. He returned to coaching in 1978, helming the St. Louis Cardinals of the National Football League for two seasons. Wilkinson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1969. Wilkinson's mother died when he was seven, and his father sent him to the Shattuck Military Academy in Faribault, Minnesota, where he excelled in five sports and graduated in 1933. He enrolled at the University of Minnesota, where, as a guard and quarterback for head coach Bernie Bierman, Wilkinson helped lead the Golden Gophers to three consecutive national
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    236
    Charley Moran

    Charley Moran

    • Current team head coached:
    Charles Barthell Moran (February 22, 1878 – June 14, 1949), nicknamed "Uncle Charley," was an American sportsman who gained renown as both a catcher and umpire in Major League Baseball and as a collegiate and professional football coach. Moran was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and played football for the University of Tennessee in 1897, but left after one year to go to Bethel College, where he coached football as well as playing the sport. After graduating, he became an assistant to Pop Warner at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, and played minor league baseball in 1902 for teams in Little Rock, Chattanooga and Dallas. In 1903, Moran pitched for the National League's St. Louis Cardinals, who finished in last place, but he appeared in only three games (plus another as a shortstop) before injuring his arm. He posted a 5.25 earned run average in his brief tenure of 24 innings, being charged with a loss without earning a win, but also batted .429. He went back to the minor leagues to manage the Dallas Giants in 1904, and continued playing with teams in Galveston (1905), Waco and Cleburne (1906), Grand Rapids (1906–07) and Savannah (1908). He returned to the Cardinals as a catcher
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    237
    Clancy Pendergast

    Clancy Pendergast

    • Current team head coached:
    Clancy Pendergast (born November 29, 1967) is the current defensive coordinator for the University of California Golden Bears and the former defensive coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs. He is also the former defensive coordinator for the NFL's Arizona Cardinals, a position he had held from the 2004 to 2008 seasons. He was a graduate assistant or assistant coach at Mississippi State, University of Southern California, University of Oklahoma, and University of Alabama at Birmingham before joining the Houston Oilers in 1995. After a year with the Oilers, he joined the Dallas Cowboys, where he spent seven seasons, first as defensive assistant/quality control/linebackers coach (1996–99), and later handing responsibilities in nickel defense packages (2000) and the secondary (2001–02). Pendergast helped develop first-round draft pick Roy Williams into a Pro Bowl safety. In 2003, he was linebackers coach with the Cleveland Browns. While working in Cleveland, Pendergast impressed personnel man Jeremy Green to the point that when Green's father, Dennis Green, became the head coach of the Arizona Cardinals, Jeremy convinced him to interview Pendergast for the job. Green was so impressed
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    238
    Curly Lambeau

    Curly Lambeau

    • Current team head coached:
    Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau (April 9, 1898 – June 1, 1965) was founder, player, and first coach of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team. He shares the distinction with rival George Halas of the Chicago Bears of coaching his team to the most NFL championships, with six. Lambeau was a standout multi-sport athlete at Green Bay East High School, and captain of its football team as a senior in 1917. Lambeau then played for legendary coach Knute Rockne at Notre Dame in 1918, making the Irish's varsity squad as a freshman, but a severe case of tonsillitis forced him to return home before his sophomore year. Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun formed the Green Bay Packers on August 11, 1919, while Lambeau was working as a shipping clerk at the Indian Packing Company. The Packers initially played teams from Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula; however, the success of the team in 1919-20 quickly led to its joining of the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing its name to the National Football League in 1922. Lambeau played for the Packers from 1919 to 1929. Although Lambeau played halfback, he was both the primary runner and passer, as
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    239
    Eddie Robinson

    Eddie Robinson

    • Current team head coached:
    Edward Gay Robinson (February 13, 1919 – April 3, 2007) was an American football coach. He is the winningest coach in NCAA Division I football. For 57 years from 1941 to 1997, he was the head coach at Grambling State University, a historically black university in Louisiana. Robinson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997. Robinson was born in Jackson in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, to the son of a sharecropper and a domestic worker. He went on to graduate from McKinley Senior High School in Baton Rouge in 1937. He went on to earn his bachelor's degree from Leland College in Baker in East Baton Rouge Parish, then went on to obtain his Master's degree from the University of Iowa in Iowa City in 1954. Robinson is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. Robinson spent 56 years as the head coach at historically black Grambling State University in Grambling in Lincoln Parish in northern Louisiana beginning in 1941 when he was hired by college president and head baseball coach, Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones. In the 1981 TV movie Grambling's White Tiger set in 1962, about the true story of Jim Gregory, the first white Quarterback at Grambling, Robinson is played by
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    240
    Erk Russell

    Erk Russell

    • Current team head coached:
    Erskine "Erk" Russell (July 23, 1926 – September 8, 2006) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach in the United States. He was also the defensive coordinator for the University of Georgia Bulldogs for seventeen years (1964–1981) and head football coach (seasons 1981–1989) of the Georgia Southern Eagles. He was also the head coach at Grady High School in Atlanta, Georgia in the 1950s. He graduated from Auburn University in Alabama where he earned ten varsity letters. He was the last four-sport letterman in the college's history. As the first head coach of Georgia Southern Eagles football team after a 40-year dormancy, Russell established a standard of excellence during his tenure, bringing them to three NCAA Division I-AA championships. Under his guidance the Georgia Southern Eagles became the first 15–0 of the 20th century. His motto was "Just one more time." Erk Russell was the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame Coach of the Year for 1984–1986; was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1987; inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1991; became USA Today's Georgia Coach of the Year and Coach of the Decade for 1989; In 1989 he also became the
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    241
    Greg Davis

    Greg Davis

    • Current team head coached:
    Greg Davis (born April 25, 1951 in Groves, Texas) is an American college football coach. He was awarded the prestigious Broyles Award for the nation's top assistant coach for the 2005 season which included a national championship victory for the Texas Longhorns. Greg Davis resigned as offensive coordinator for Texas after the 2010 season. In 2012, he was named to the same position for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes football team, in addition to serving as quarterbacks coach. Davis attended Port Neches-Groves High School and then played quarterback at McNeese State University, where he first met R. C. Slocum. He played in the Grantland Rice Bowl in 1971, losing to Tennessee State 26–23. He graduated from McNeese State in 1973. Davis started his coaching career as a quarterbacks/receivers coach at Barbe High School in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He served two seasons there, and then went on to become the quarterbacks coach for two seasons at Port Neches-Groves High School, his high school alma mater. He began his college coaching career as the quarterbacks coach under Tom Wilson and Jackie Sherrill at Texas A&M University. He was a part-time assistant at A&M in 1978, and then was named
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    242
    Jeff Fisher

    Jeff Fisher

    • Current team head coached: St. Louis Rams
    Jeffrey Michael "Jeff" Fisher (born February 25, 1958) is currently the head coach of the St. Louis Rams and was previously the head coach of the Tennessee Titans, and has a career record of 150-128 as a head coach. A native of Southern California, Fisher starred as a high school All-America wide receiver at Taft High School in Woodland Hills. Fisher later went on to star at USC, under coach John Robinson. During his collegiate career (1977–80), he played alongside such defensive stars as Ronnie Lott, Dennis Smith, and Joey Browner. Fisher's USC teammates also included star offensive lineman Bruce Matthews, whom he would coach years later with the Oilers and Titans. Fisher and the Trojans won a national championship during the 1978 season, and in 1980 he was honored as a Pac-10 All-Academic selection. Fisher was drafted in the 7th round of the 1981 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears. He appeared in 49 games as a defensive back and return specialist in his five seasons with the Bears. He earned a Super Bowl ring after Chicago’s 1985 Super Bowl season, despite spending the year on injured reserve with an ankle injury that prematurely ended his playing career. In 1983, Fisher had suffered
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    243
    Jewell Wallace

    Jewell Wallace

    • Current team head coached:
    William Jewell Wallace (June 16, 1907 – April 7, 1999) was an American football player and coach in the United States. He served as the head football coach at the University of Houston in its first two football seasons, 1946 and 1947, guiding the Cougars to a 7–14 record. Wallace was a 1934 graduate of Texas Christian University. He began his coaching career at the high school ranks and coached at El Paso Bowie, El Paso, Greenville, San Angelo and Thomas Jefferson High School in San Antonio, Texas.
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    244
    Mack Brown

    Mack Brown

    • Current team head coached: Texas Longhorns football
    William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is an American college football coach. He is the current head coach of the Texas Longhorns football team of the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to his head coach position at Texas, Brown was head coach at Appalachian State, Tulane, and North Carolina. Brown is credited with revitalizing the Texas and North Carolina football programs. The Longhorns beat Michigan in the 2005 Rose Bowl, Ohio State at The Horseshoe in September 2005, and division rival Oklahoma in 1998, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2008, and 2009. The 2005 season was capped off by victories over Colorado and USC to win the Big 12 conference and national championships, respectively. In 2006 he was awarded the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award for "Coach of the Year". On November 27, 2008 Brown achieved his 200th career win, making him the first Texas coach to reach that mark. Brown was born as the middle of three children (brothers Mel, youngest, and Watson) on August 27, 1951 in Cookeville, Tennessee. During his teenage years, he attended Putnam County High School. He was the product of a disciplined home with an early curfew. Brown's family had a long history with football. His grandfather,
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    245
    Mike Tomlin

    Mike Tomlin

    • Current team head coached: Pittsburgh Steelers
    Michael Tomlin (born March 15, 1972) is the current head coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League. Tomlin is the third youngest head coach in any of the four major North American professional sports. He is the tenth African-American head coach in NFL history, and first in Steelers history. With the Steelers' victory in Super Bowl XLIII on February 1, 2009, Tomlin became the youngest head coach to lead his team to a Super Bowl victory. Tomlin grew up in Newport News, VA. attended Denbigh High School and was a three-year starter as a wide receiver/tight end for the College of William and Mary, where he became a member of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He finished his career with a school-record 20 touchdown catches. He was a second-team All-Yankee Conference selection in 1994. Tomlin never played in the NFL. Tomlin's coaching career began in 1995 as the wide receiver coach at Virginia Military Institute under former West Virginia University head coach Bill Stewart. He spent the 1996 season as a graduate assistant at the University of Memphis, where he worked with the defensive backs and special teams. Following a brief stint on the University of Tennessee at
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    Nick Holt

    Nick Holt

    • Current team head coached:
    Nicholas "Nick" Holt V (born October 15, 1962) is a college football coach, most recently the defensive coordinator and assistant head coach of the Washington Huskies. Prior to taking the position in 2009, he was the defensive coordinator and defensive line coach of the USC Trojans, and the head coach of the Idaho Vandals from 2004-05. Nick Holt attended high school at Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose, California, where he played football and baseball and graduated in 1981. He attended the University of the Pacific in Stockton, where he played linebacker and lettered for four years for the Tigers. In his senior season of 1985, Holt was an All-American honorable mention, Pacific's MVP and a team captain. He graduated from UOP in 1986 with a bachelor's degree in political economics. In 1986, Holt served as defensive coordinator at St. Mary's High School in Stockton. In 1987 he moved to Las Vegas to coach linebackers at UNLV, serving as a graduate assistant during the first season. In 1990 Holt moved north to serve as the defensive line coach at Idaho under head coach John L. Smith, then Chris Tormey. Ater eight seasons in Moscow, he moved east in 1998 to Louisville to
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    Paul Dietzel

    Paul Dietzel

    • Current team head coached:
    Paul Dietzel (born September 5, 1924) is a former American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head coach at Louisiana State University (1955–1961), the United States Military Academy (1962–1965), and the University of South Carolina (1966–1974), compiling a career record of 109–95–5. Dietzel's 1958 LSU team concluded an 11–0 season with a win over Clemson in the Sugar Bowl and was a consensus national champion. For his efforts that year, Dietzel was named the National Coach of the Year by both the American Football Coaches Association and the Football Writers Association of America. Dietzel also served as the athletic director at South Carolina (1966–1975), at Indiana University Bloomington (1977–1978), and at LSU (1978–1982). Dietzel began his football career in Mansfield, Ohio, where his high school team went undefeated and tied for second in the state. After high school, he was given a scholarship to play football at Duke University. After one year at Duke, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. From there he moved on to Miami University of Ohio, where he became an All-American at center. After graduating from Miami
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    Skip Holtz

    Skip Holtz

    • Current team head coached: South Florida Bulls football
    Louis Leo "Skip" Holtz, Jr. (born March 12, 1964) is the head coach of the University of South Florida football team. Prior to 2010, Holtz served as the head coach of the East Carolina University football team. Skip, a former American football player, was the head coach of the Connecticut Huskies football team between 1994 and 1998 and an assistant head coach for the University of South Carolina Gamecocks between 1998 and 2004. Skip's father, Lou Holtz, is an acclaimed former head football coach and currently works as a commentator on the television channel ESPN. Due to his father's career as a collegiate football coach, Skip was exposed to football from an early age. At the time of Skip's birth, Lou was a football assistant for the Connecticut Huskies. Skip attended Fayetteville High School in Arkansas, and played on the school's football team as the team's quarterback. At the same time, his father was the head coach at the University of Arkansas. After graduating from Fayetteville High School, Skip attended Holy Cross College for two years. He then transferred to Notre Dame, where he earned a bachelor's degree in business management. While at Notre Dame, he lettered in football
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    Tommy Bowden

    Tommy Bowden

    • Current team head coached:
    Tommy Bowden (born July 10, 1954) is an American football coach who served as the head coach at Clemson University from 1999 until October 13, 2008. He is the son of Bobby Bowden, former head coach of Florida State University, against whom he has coached in games nicknamed the "Bowden Bowl." Before Clemson University, Bowden was the head coach at Tulane University, and an assistant at the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Duke University, the University of Kentucky, East Carolina University and, with his father, at Florida State. His 1998 Tulane squad went 12–0 and achieved a top-10 final ranking in both polls. Bowden was hired as Clemson's head coach before the 1999 season. Bowden's Clemson teams went to a bowl game every year he coached there, except in 2004, when both teams agreed to decline any invitation to a bowl game for that year after a brawl with rival South Carolina. He resigned on October 13, 2008, after leading the team to a disappointing 3–3 record (1–2 ACC) at the midpoint of a season in which the Tigers had been an almost unanimous preseason pick to win their first ACC title under Bowden and were ranked #9 in the preseason polls. Assistant head coach/wide
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    Tommy Tuberville

    Tommy Tuberville

    • Current team head coached:
    Thomas Hawley Tuberville (born September 18, 1954) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Texas Tech University, a position he has held since the 2010 season. Tuberville served as the head football coach at the University of Mississippi from 1995 to 1998 and at Auburn University from 1999 until December 3, 2008, when he resigned from the position after completing his tenth season. Tuberville was the 2004 recipient of the Walter Camp and Paul Bryant Coach of the Year awards after Auburn's 13–0 season, in which his team won the Southeastern Conference title and the Sugar Bowl, but was left out of the BCS National Championship Game. Tuberville earned his 100th career win on October 6, 2007 in a 35–7 victory over Vanderbilt. He is the only coach in Auburn football history to beat in-state rival Alabama six consecutive times. In 2011, Tuberville was elected second vice president of the American Football Coaches Association. According to AFCA tradition, he will move up to first vice president in 2012 and president in 2013. Tuberville was born and raised in Camden, Arkansas. He graduated from Harmony Grove High School in Camden in 1972.
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