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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Protected Site of All Time

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    1
    Itala Game Reserve

    Itala Game Reserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Ithala Game Reserve, 290 km of rugged, mountainous thornveld in northern KwaZulu-Natal, about 400 km north of Durban. It is one of the youngest game parks in South Africa. The altitude varies from 400 m (Phongolo River) to 1450 m (Ngotshe Mountains), so there is a great variation of terrain which extends over lowveld and densely vegetated river valleys to high-lying grassland plateaus, ridges and cliff faces. All the big game species have been re-established with the exception of lion.
    6.75
    8 votes
    2
    Cedar Mountain Wilderness

    Cedar Mountain Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Bureau of Land Management
    The Cedar Mountain Wilderness is located in northwestern Utah, USA, just south of Interstate 80. The vegetation on the upper elevations of the Cedar Mountains is dominated by junipers (referred to as "cedars" by early pioneers). The foothill and valley regions include mixed desert shrubs. Cheatgrass is prevalent over large areas burned by range fires. The remains of an aragonite mining camp can also be found in the foothills. The Cedar Mountain Wilderness includes more than half of the 180,000 acre (728 km²) Cedar Mountain Herd Management Area, where feral horses have grazed since they were introduced in the late 19th century. A survey conducted in December 1991 counted 444 horses, and parts of the herd can often be seen on the wilderness. The Bureau of Land Management fills watering troughs for the horses when springs dry up in the summer. This artificial water supply benefits other wildlife species such as pronghorn antelope. The U.S. Congress designated the Cedar Mountain Wilderness primarily in response to an effort by members of the Utah congressional delegation and the Utah governor to block rail access to a proposed high-level nuclear waste storage facility on the nearby
    7.00
    7 votes
    3
    Clearwater Wilderness

    Clearwater Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Clearwater Wilderness, a small 14,300-acre (58 km) wilderness created by Congress in the 1984 under the 1964 Wilderness Act establishing the National Wilderness Preservation System. It is located in northeast Pierce County, southeast of Tacoma in the South Cascade Range in Washington, United States. Its southern border is Mount Rainier National Park and it affords many spectacular views of Mount Rainier. Bearhead Mountain, the highest peak, is 6,089 feet (1,856 m) high. Below are the headwaters of the north-flowing Clearwater River. Old-growth forests of Douglas-fir, Western Hemlock and Western Red Cedar, reachable by hiking trails, are nourished by many streams and eight small lakes, including Summit Lake. Forest understorey is made up mostly of ferns and moss. The rainy season between October and May receives 90 percent of the annual rainfall, which can be as much as 25 feet (7.6 m), while snow can remain as late as July in high areas. Cascades wildlife typically includes bears, deer, squirrels, skunks, raccoons, marmots, and a few herds of elk. The National Wilderness Preservation System website provides a list of things to consider when planning a trip to a wilderness.
    7.67
    6 votes
    4
    Cimarron National Grassland

    Cimarron National Grassland

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Cimarron National Grassland is a National Grassland located in Morton County, Kansas, United States, with a very small part extending eastward into Stevens County. Cimarron National Grassland is located near Comanche National Grassland which is across the border in Colorado. The grassland is administered by the Forest Service together with the Pike and San Isabel National Forests and the Comanche National Grassland, from common headquarters located in Pueblo, Colorado. There are local ranger district offices in Elkhart, Kansas. The grassland is the largest area of public land in the state of Kansas. The Cimarron National Grassland consists of 1,106,604 acres (447,827 ha) of Great Plains bisected by the Cimarron River. The elevations on the Grassland range from 3,100 to 3,700 feet (940 to 1,100 m). The terrain is mostly flat, sloping downward west to east, although bluffs rise about one hundred feet (30 m) above the valley of the Cimarron. Vegetation is mostly shortgrass prairie grassland, dominated by sand sagebrush in salty soils. Groves of Cottonwood and other trees are found near the river. Climate. The climate of the National Grassland is semi-arid, receiving about 18 inches
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Van Vihar National Park

    Van Vihar National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Van Vihar National Park is a national park in India located a the heart of Bhopal, the capital city of Madhya Pradesh. Declared a national park in 1983, it covers an area of about 4.45 km². Although it has the status of a national park, Van Vihar is developed and managed as a modern zoological park, following the guidelines of the Central Zoo Authority. The animals are kept in their near natural habitat. Most of the animals are either orphaned brought from various parts of the state or those, which are exchanged from other zoos. No animal is deliberately captured from the forest. Van Vihar is unique because it allows easy access to the visitors through a road passing through the park, security of animals from poachers by building trenches and walls and providing natural habitat to the animals. About two decades back, a number of illegal stone quarries were operational in the area and being in the serene and beautiful location on the bank of big lake, many commercial organizations were trying to take hold of this valuable piece of land. Realizing importance of both in-situ and ex-situ conservation of wild fauna, it was decided to provide this area a legal umbrella under the Wildlife
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Chaco Culture National Historical Park

    Chaco Culture National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Chaco Culture National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park hosting the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest. The park is located in northwestern New Mexico, between Albuquerque and Farmington, in a remote canyon cut by the Chaco Wash. Containing the most sweeping collection of ancient ruins north of Mexico, the park preserves one of the United States' most important pre-Columbian cultural and historical areas. Between AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancient Pueblo Peoples. Chacoans quarried sandstone blocks and hauled timber from great distances, assembling fifteen major complexes which remained the largest buildings in North America until the 19th century. Evidence of archaeoastronomy at Chaco has been proposed, with the "Sun Dagger" petroglyph at Fajada Butte a popular example. Many Chacoan buildings may have been aligned to capture the solar and lunar cycles, requiring generations of astronomical observations and centuries of skillfully coordinated construction. Climate change is thought to have led to the emigration of Chacoans and the eventual abandonment of the canyon,
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Natural Bridge Battlefield State Historic Site

    Natural Bridge Battlefield State Historic Site

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Natural Bridge Battlefield State Historic Site is a Florida State Park in Leon County, Florida. It is located roughly between the city of Tallahassee and the town of St. Marks. During the American Civil War, the Battle of Natural Bridge was fought here on March 6, 1865. The site is named for a natural bridge over the St. Marks River. The park has picnicking areas.
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Palm Cottage

    Palm Cottage

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Palm Cottage (also known as Flagler Worker's House) is a historic home in Miami, Florida. It is located at 60 Southeast 4th Street. On January 4, 1989, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Palm Cottage was built in 1897.
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Gateway National Recreation Area

    Gateway National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Gateway National Recreation Area is a 26,607-acre (10,767 ha) National Recreation Area in the Port of New York and New Jersey. Scattered over Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island, New York and Monmouth County, New Jersey, it provides recreational opportunities that are rare for a dense urban environment, including ocean swimming, bird watching, boating, hiking and camping. Ten million people visit Gateway annually. Gateway was created by the US Congress in 1972 to preserve and protect scarce and/or unique natural, cultural, and recreational resources with relatively convenient access by a high percentage of the nation's population. It is owned by the United States government and managed by the National Park Service. The park comprises eleven park sites in three units: Law enforcement in Gateway is the responsibility of the United States Park Police in the New York units, and commissioned park rangers in the New Jersey unit.
    6.14
    7 votes
    10
    Hamilton Grange National Memorial

    Hamilton Grange National Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Hamilton Grange National Memorial is a National Park Service site in St. Nicholas Park, New York City that preserves the relocated home of U.S. Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. Alexander Hamilton was born and raised in the West Indies and came to New York in 1772 at age 17 to study at King's College (now Columbia University). During his career, Hamilton was a military officer, lawyer, member of the United States Constitutional Convention, American politician, and the first United States Secretary of the Treasury. Hamilton commissioned architect John McComb Jr. to design a country home on Hamilton's 32 acres (13 ha) (0.13 km²) estate in upper Manhattan. The two-story frame Federal style house was completed in 1802, just two years before Hamilton's death resulting from his duel with Aaron Burr on July 11, 1804. The house was named "The Grange" after Hamilton's grandfather's estate in Scotland. The Grange was the only home ever owned by Hamilton and it remained in his family for 30 years after his death. The Hamilton Heights neighborhood of Harlem derived its name from Hamilton and the Grange. By 1889, much of the congregation of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Greenwich Village had
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Soldier Creek Wilderness

    Soldier Creek Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Soldier Creek Wilderness is located in the U.S. state of Nebraska. Created by an act of Congress in 1986, the wilderness is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and covers an area of 7,794 acres (31.54 km) within the Pine Ridge section of the Nebraska National Forest. The wilderness experienced a large wildfire in 1989, which destroyed almost 90 percent of the ponderosa pine forest, which today is slowly rebounding. The threatened Bald eagle can be found here, as can white-tailed deer, mule deer, bobcats, coyotes and numerous other mammals. The region, which was originally established as a timber reservation for nearby Fort Robinson, was utilized by the U.S. Cavalry from the late 19th century through World War II for its excellent horse pastures along Soldier Creek. A series of trails pass two windmills that are still functioning, even though they are not maintained and are over 100 years old. A popular destination for horseback riding, the wilderness is the larger of the two federally-designated wilderness areas in Nebraska. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with a proper permit, no roads
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Navajo National Monument

    Navajo National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Navajo National Monument is located within the northwest portion of the Navajo Reservation in northern Arizona. Navajo National Monument preserves three of the most intact cliff dwellings of the ancestral puebloan people (Hisatsinom). The Navajo people who live here today call these ancient ones Anasazi. The monument is high on the Shonto plateau, overlooking the Tsegi Canyon system in the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona. The monument, located west of Kayenta, Arizona, features a visitor center with a museum, two short self-guided mesa top trails, two small campgrounds, and a picnic area. Rangers guide visitors on free tours of the Keet Seel (Kitsʼiil) and Betatakin (Bitátʼahkin) cliff dwellings. The Inscription House site (Tsʼah Biiʼ Kin), further west, is currently closed to public access. The Sandal Trail is an accessible self-guided walk that provides views of the spectacular canyonlands and rugged topography near the visitor center. Interpretive signs provide information on local flora and other topics. The 1.6 km round-trip trail ends at an overlook of the Betatakin ruins across the 560 feet (170 m) deep Betatakin Canyon. The National Monument was listed on the National
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    Karoo National Park

    Karoo National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Karoo National Park, founded in 1979, is a wildlife reserve in the isolated Karoo area of the Western Cape, South Africa near Beaufort West. The area is mostly semi-desert and is well known for its isolation. The national park, which covers an area of 767.9 square kilometres (296.5 sq mi), is home of many desert mammals, along with the Verreaux's Eagle and various species of tortoise, for the park lays claim to having the most of these species of any national park. Endangered species such as the Black Rhinoceros and Riverine Rabbit have been successfully resettled here. Many fossils have been uncovered at both the national park and its surrounding area, of which some are estimated at almost three-hundred million years old. Most fossils date from the Mesozoic Era in the history of Earth. During this period, the area was covered by sea, depositing its sediment atop the dead creatures. The area then became volcanic and as the sandstone eroded away, it left the conical and table-shaped mountains that are characteristic of Karoo. Karoo National Park is also known for its connection with the Quagga Project, a project run by Reinhold Rau to bring back an animal that looked and acted
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

    Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: United States Bureau of Land Management
    Vermilion Cliffs National Monument is located in Arizona, immediately south of the Utah state line. This National Monument, 294,000 acres (1,190 km) in area, protects the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. Elevations in the Monument range from 3,100 feet to 6,500 feet above sea level (944 to 1,981 meters). Established on November 9, 2000, by a Presidential proclamation by Pres. Bill Clinton, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument was carved from existing lands already under the management of the U.S. Government in extreme northern Coconino County, Arizona, immediately south of the border with the state of Utah. The monument is administered by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Vermilion Cliffs themselves run along the southern and eastern edges of this National Monument. Much of the Monument's land consists of the Paria Plateau, a flat area extending northward from the tops of the cliffs. The Vermilion Cliffs are steep eroded escarpments consisting primarily of sandstone, siltstone, limestone, and shale which rise as much as 3,000 feet (910 m) above their bases. These sedimentary rocks have been
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    AIDS Memorial Grove

    AIDS Memorial Grove

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The National AIDS Memorial Grove, or "The Grove," is located at the de Laveaga Dell in eastern Golden Gate Park, in San Francisco, California. The Grove is a dedicated space and place in the national landscape where the millions of Americans touched directly or indirectly by AIDS can gather to heal, hope, and remember. The mission of the AIDS Memorial Grove is to provide a healing sanctuary, and to promote learning and understanding of the human tragedy of the AIDS pandemic. Congress and the President of the United States approved the “National AIDS Memorial Grove Act” in 1996, which officially set aside the deLaveaga Dell land in Golden Gate Park as the site for the first AIDS memorial in the nation. The Grove continues through the additional generosity of services and financial support given by numerous individuals, corporations, and foundations. Thousands of community volunteers have ensured over 20 years that continuous gardening and regular maintenance occurs, along with periodic enhancement projects, to keep the landscape vital and sense of place beautiful. The Grove serves as an important sanctuary for people, from locals to world visitors, a refuge for memories and a place
    9.00
    4 votes
    16
    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont. The park preserves the site where Frederick Billings established a managed forest and a progressive dairy farm. The name honors Billings and the other owners of the property: George Perkins Marsh and Laurence and Mary French Rockefeller. The Rockefellers transferred the property to the federal government in 1992. It is the only unit of the United States National Park System in Vermont (except for the Appalachian Trail). Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park was awarded the first Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification of a United States national park by the Rainforest Alliance's SmartWood program in August 2005. This certification made Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller only the second United States federal land to receive such certification for sustainable forest management. Visitors can take guided tours of the 19th century George Perkins Marsh Boyhood Home, which includes displays of landscape paintings, highlighting the influence painting and photography had on the conservation movement. The gardens have also been restored.
    5.86
    7 votes
    17
    Desolation Wilderness

    Desolation Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Desolation Wilderness is a 63,690-acre (257.7 km) federally protected wilderness area located along the crest of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, just southwest of Lake Tahoe in El Dorado County, California, United States. It is a popular backpacking destination, with much barren rocky terrain at the edge of the tree line: it has extensive areas of bare granite. Lake Aloha is a feature of the wilderness area, with shallow, clear waters sitting in a wide granite basin carved by glaciers in the last ice age. The Crystal Range is within the wilderness with Pyramid Peak as the highest point in the range and in the wilderness at 9,985 feet (3,043 m) in elevation. Among the many waterfalls within the wilderness is Horsetail Falls. The location was originally set aside as the Desolation Valley Primitive Area in 1931 with an area of 64,000 acres (260 km). In 1969, it became the Desolation Wilderness. It is within the Eldorado National Forest and is managed by the US Forest Service. The national forests began as forest "reserves" and were managed by the General Land Office until the Forest Service came into existence in 1905. The following is a list of trailheads that provide access to
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in the District of Columbia and the states of Maryland and West Virginia. The park was established as a National Monument in 1961 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in order to preserve the neglected remains of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal along the Potomac River along with many of the original canal structures. The canal and towpath trail extends from Georgetown, Washington, D.C. to Cumberland, Maryland, a distance of 184.5 miles (296.9 km). Construction on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (also known as "the Grand Old Ditch" or the "C&O Canal") began in 1828 but was not completed until 1850. Even then, the canal fell far short of its intended destination of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Instead, the canal terminated at Cumberland for a total distance of approximately 184.5 miles. The canal was already considered obsolete by the time it was completed because a railroad line had arrived in Cumberland eight years before the canal was finally finished. The C&O Canal operated from 1831 to 1924 and served primarily as a means to transport coal from the Allegheny Mountains to Washington
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Elbow-Sheep Wildland Provincial Park

    Elbow-Sheep Wildland Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Elbow-Sheep Wildland Provincial Park is a provincial park and wildlife reserve located in the Kananaskis Country in south-western Alberta, Canada. The park offers setting for hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding through mountain landscapes of lodgepole pine and spruce forests.
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Kiowa National Grassland

    Kiowa National Grassland

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Kiowa National Grassland is a National Grassland located in New Mexico, USA. The Great Plains grassland includes prairie and part of the Canadian River Canyon. It is located in two non-adjacent units of northeastern New Mexico. The western unit is located in northwestern Harding, eastern Mora, and southeastern Colfax counties. The smaller eastern unit is located in eastern Union County, on the border with Oklahoma and Texas. The grassland has a total area of 136,417 acres (55,206 ha). The grassland is administered by the Forest Service together with the Cibola National Forest and the Black Kettle, McClellan Creek, and Rita Blanca National Grasslands, from common headquarters located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. There are local ranger district offices located in Clayton. The community of Mills lies within the western unit of the Kiowa National Grassland. Clayton is the nearest town to the eastern unit of the Grassland. Both units of the National Grassland consist of a patchwork quilt of public land interspaced with private land. Elevations on the Grassland range from 4,500 to 6,300 feet (1,400 to 1,900 m) which is high enough to moderate somewhat the summer temperatures of the Great
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C., at Judiciary Square, honors the more than 19,000 U.S. law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty throughout history. The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund was established by former U.S. Representative Mario Biaggi (D-NY), a 23-year New York City police veteran who was wounded in the line of duty over 10 times before retiring in 1965. The mission of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund is to generate increased public support for the law enforcement profession by permanently recording and appropriately commemorating the service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers; and to provide information that will help promote law enforcement safety. Donald J. Guilfoil, a detective with the Suffolk County PBA, initiated the federal legislation to establish a National Police Memorial in 1972. Rep. Biaggi then took up the cause and joined forces with U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell (D-RI) to establish the national monument to honor all of America's fallen law enforcement heroes. The legislation to authorize the Memorial was enacted in October 1984. Fifteen national law enforcement
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park

    Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park is a Florida State Park located at mile marker 85.5 near Islamorada. It was a former quarry used by Henry Flagler in the early 1900s to help his building of the Overseas Railroad. Following the railroad's completion, it was a source for decorative stone pieces called Keystone. Now on display are exposed sections of fossilized coral, as well as some of the original quarry machinery. The Hurricane Monument at Mile Marker 82 in Islamorada is constructed of keystone from the quarry. Florida state parks are open between 8 a.m. and sundown every day of the year (including holidays). The visitor center is open Thursday through Monday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.
    8.50
    4 votes
    23
    Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Bering Land Bridge National Preserve is one of the most remote United States national park areas, located on the Seward Peninsula. The National Preserve protects a remnant of the Bering Land Bridge that connected Asia with North America more than 13,000 years ago during the Pleistocene ice age. The majority of this land bridge, once thousands of miles wide, now lies beneath the waters of the Chukchi and Bering Seas. During the glacial epoch this was part of a migration route for people, animals, and plants whenever ocean levels fell enough to expose the land bridge. Archeologists agree that it was across this Bering Land Bridge, also called Beringia, that humans first migrated from Asia to populate the Americas (see Models of migration to the New World). The preserve was originally created December 1, 1978, as Bering Land Bridge National Monument. On December 2, 1980, the designation was changed to a National Preserve. The Preserve's western boundary lies 42 miles from the Bering Strait and the fishing boundary between the United States and Russia. There are no roads into the preserve. Access to the preserve is by bush planes or boats during summer months and by ski planes,
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    Alta Toquima Wilderness

    Alta Toquima Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Alta Toquima Wilderness is a protected wilderness area in the Toquima Range of Nye County, in the central section of the state of Nevada in the western United States. It covers an area of 35,860 acres (145.1 km), and is administered by the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. The Mount Jefferson Research Natural Area protects 4,953 acres (20 km) around Mount Jefferson, the highest peak in Central Nevada. The Mount Jefferson Research Natural Area is the most unusual environments in the USA, due to its extreme alpine conditions. Wildlife is plentiful in the Wilderness, including bighorn sheep, deer, grouse, chukar and native trout.
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Archbald Pothole State Park

    Archbald Pothole State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Archbald Pothole State Park is a 149.16-acre (60.36 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Archbald, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The focal point of the park is Archbald Pothole. The pothole is a remnant of the Wisconsin Glacial Period, 38 feet (11.6 m) deep with a largest diameter of 42 feet (12.8 m) by 24 feet (7.3 m). It has drawn tourists since just after it was discovered in 1884. Archbald Pothole State Park is on U.S. Route 6 Business in the borough of Archbald. A coal miner, Patrick Mahon, discovered Archbald Pothole in 1884. Mahon was extending a mine shaft. When he set off a blast of explosives, water and stones came pouring into the mine shaft. He and the other miners fled the scene fearing for their lives. The manager of the mining company, Edward Jones, came to investigate. Jones ordered that the area be cleared of the fallen debris. Almost 1,000 tons of small rounded stones were removed and Jones soon realized that the vertical tunnel discovered by the coal miners, was a large pothole. After serving as a ventilation shaft for the mine, the pothole was fenced in by the owner of the land, Colonel Hackley, for tourists to look at it. The pothole soon
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Natchez National Historical Park

    Natchez National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Natchez National Historical Park commemorates the history of Natchez, Mississippi, and is managed by the National Park Service. The park consists of three distinct parts. Fort Rosalie is the site of a fortification from the 18th century, built by the French, and later controlled by the United Kingdom, Spain, and the United States. The William Johnson House is the home of William Johnson, a free African American barber and resident of Natchez whose diary has been published. Melrose is the estate of John T. McMurran, a lawyer and state senator who was a planter in Natchez from 1830 until the Civil War. The fort is not open to the public. The other two units of the park include displays related to life in antebellum Natchez. The collection at Melrose's two-story Greek Revival main house and its slave quarters includes painted floor cloths, mahogany punkah, a set of Rococo Revival parlor furniture, a set of Gothic Revival dining room chairs, and bookcases with books dating to the 18th century. These were collected from Natchez families including the McMurran family. The collection in the Johnson house includes furnishings from his life and family. Archaeological objects found in the
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Tuscarora State Forest

    Tuscarora State Forest

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Tuscarora State Forest is a Pennsylvania state forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #3. The main office is located in Blain in Perry County, Pennsylvania in the United States. Tuscarora State Forest contains 91,165 acres (36,893 ha) in several tracts and is located in Cumberland, Franklin, Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin, and Perry counties. Tuscarora State Forest was formed as a direct result of the depletion of the forests of Pennsylvania that took place during the mid-to-late 19th century. Conservationists like Dr. Joseph Rothrock became concerned that the forests would not regrow if they were not managed properly. Lumber and iron companies had harvested the old-growth forests for various reasons. They clear cut the forests and left behind nothing but dried tree tops and rotting stumps. The sparks of passing steam locomotives ignited wildfires that prevented the formation of second growth forests. The conservationists feared that the forest would never regrow if there was not a change in the philosophy of forest management. They called for the state to purchase land from the lumber and iron companies and the lumber and iron companies were more than willing to sell
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    Jotunheim National Park

    Jotunheim National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Jotunheimen (“Home of the Giants”) National Park (Norwegian: Jotunheimen nasjonalpark) is a national park in Norway, recognized as one of the country's premier hiking and fishing regions. The national park covers 1,151 km² and is part of the larger area Jotunheimen. More than 250 peaks rise above 1,900 metres (6,000 feet), including Northern Europe's two highest peaks: Galdhøpiggen at 2,469 metres, and Glittertind at 2,465 metres. The National Park covers most of the mountainous region of Jotunheimen, including Hurrungane, but Utladalen and its surroundings are within Utladalen Landscape Protection Area. Geographically, it lies in both Oppland and Sogn og Fjordane counties. Geologically the Jotunheimen is a Precambrian province. Glaciers have carved the hard gabbro rock massifs of the Jotunheimen, leaving numerous valleys and the many peaks. Wildlife include the reindeer, elk, deer, wolverines and lynx. Most lakes and rivers hold trout. Jotunheimen has been the site of hunting since before recorded time. Remains of Stone Age hunting camps have been found near the lakes Gjende and Russvatnet. These remains extend through the bronze and Iron Age, up to recorded times. The high
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Pirin National Park

    Pirin National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Pirin National Park is a World Heritage national park that encompasses the larger part of the Pirin Mountains in the southwest of Bulgaria. It has an area of about 400 km (150 sq mi) and lies at an altitude from 1,008–2,914 m (3,307–9,560 ft). Two nature reserves are located within the boundaries of the park, Bayuvi Dupki-Dzhindzhiritsa, one of the oldest in the country, and Yulen. The park's boundaries and size have stood many changes through the course of history. Vihren National Park was created on 8 November 1962 with the purpose of preservation of the forests in the highest parts of the mountain. The park had an area of 62 km (24 sq mi), which is a small part of its modern territory. It was renamed to Pirin People's Park in 1974 with a ministerial decree and its territory was considerably enlarged. A separate park administration was established in 1979 with its seat in Bansko. The park was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1983, and after a protected areas law was approved in 1998, the area was proclaimed a national park, embracing a territory of 403.32 km (155.72 sq mi). The huge relief diversity of the park is the reason for the variety of plant species on its
    9.33
    3 votes
    30
    Spruce Creek Mound Complex

    Spruce Creek Mound Complex

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Spruce Creek Mound Complex is a prehistoric and early historic archeological site in Port Orange, Florida. The mound complex, major earthworks built out of earth and shell middens, was constructed by ancient indigenous peoples. It is located near Port Orange, on the southwest bank of Spruce Creek. On December 3, 1990, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. The Spruce Creek Mound, located on a bluff above the river, was still tall enough during early colonial years to be used by travelers as a point of navigation. It was used as a ceremonial center and burial mound, and was believed to have been built from 500-1000 AD. The mound was added to over centuries, with layers of burials built upon each other. At the time of European encounter, the site was used by Timucuan natives. They had harvested and eaten so much local shellfish, which comprised the bulk of their diet, that they left large shell middens. The site also has historic European artifacts from the early colonial period (1550-17000 AD). This suggests it was one of the villages visited by Spanish explorers, traders and/or colonists.
    9.33
    3 votes
    31
    New Smyrna Sugar Mill Ruins

    New Smyrna Sugar Mill Ruins

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The New Smyrna Sugar Mill Ruins (also known as the Cruger and DePeyster Sugar Mill) is a historic site in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, at 600 Old Mission Road. On August 12, 1970, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In 1830 a steam sugar and saw mill were erected at this site. 5 years later the mills and other buildings were destroyed by Indians. The site was further altered by soldiers who were garrisoned there to keep an eye over the Seminoles The ruins were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 12, 1970, reference number 70000192.
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

    Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, administered by the National Park Service, preserves almost 70,000 acres (28,000 ha) of land along the Delaware River's New Jersey and Pennsylvania shores, stretching from the Delaware Water Gap northward almost to the New York state line. Middle Delaware National Scenic River is a designated 40-mile (64 km) section of the river entirely within the recreation area. The park came about because of a plan to build a dam on the Delaware River at Tocks Island, just north of the Delaware Water Gap to control water levels for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. The dam would have created a 37 mile lake in the center of present park for use as a reservoir. Starting in 1960, the present day area of the Recreation Area was acquired for the Army Corps of Engineers through eminent domain. Between 3,000 and 5,000 dwellings were demolished, including historical sites, and about 15,000 people were displaced by the project. Because of massive environmental opposition, dwindling funds, and an unacceptable geological assessment of the dam's safety, the government transferred the property to the National Park Service in 1978. The National
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Safety Harbor Site

    Safety Harbor Site

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Safety Harbor Site is a historic site in Safety Harbor, Florida, located in Philippe Park, at 2355 Bayshore Drive. It is the largest remaining mound in the Tampa Bay area, and is believed to have been the "capital city" of the Tocobaga. It is the type site for the Safety Harbor culture. In 1964, it was declared a National Historic Landmark After the U.S. National Register of Historic Places program was created in 1966, the site was added to it the same year. It is sometimes referred to as the "Indian Mound." The site consists of the large 20 foot high temple mound, one smaller burial mound and two shell middens. The site is open to visitors during the daylight hours. In addition to the mounds, the site holds walking paths, picnic areas, a boat ramp, fishing, and fantastic views.
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Carson-Pegasus Provincial Park

    Carson-Pegasus Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Carson-Pegasus Provincial Park is a provincial park located in central Alberta, Canada within Woodlands County. The park is located around McLeod Lake (previously named Carson Lake) and Little McLeod Lake (previously known as Pegasus Lake), approximately 23 km (14 mi) north of Whitecourt. It is accessed by Highway 32. The park protects the boreal forest ecosystem with aspen, balsam poplar, balsam fir and white spruce, as well as the willow/alder shorelines, black spruce bogs, grass marshes, and fens. The park is also a fishing spot and a habitat for diverse mammals and birds.
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area

    Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area is a 949.49-acre (384.24 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Lower Paxton and Middle Paxton Townships, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The land for the conservation area was donated to the state by real estate developer Alex Boyd in 1999. Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area is a sanctuary for mature trees and an environment education study area. The park is on Blue Mountain just off Pennsylvania Route 443. A conservation area is different from a state park. Conservation areas have much less development on the lands than a state park. They are large tracts of land with few improvements, a lack of through roads and the recreational facilities are minimal. There is an effort to manage the resources with minimal development of the park. Other conservation areas in Pennsylvania are the nearby Joseph E. Ibberson Conservation Area and Varden Conservation Area in Wayne County. The large mature trees and thick woods of Boyd Big Tree Preserve Conservation Area make it and ideal habitat for a large variety of woodland creatures. The park is home to White-tailed deer, Black Bear, Wild Turkeys, Ruffed Grouse and Eastern Gray Squirrels.
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Curecanti National Recreation Area

    Curecanti National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Curecanti National Recreation Area, in Colorado, is formed by three reservoirs, named for corresponding dams on the Gunnison River. The national recreation area borders Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park on the west. Panoramic mesas, fjord-like reservoirs, and deep, steep and narrow canyons abound. Recently discovered dinosaur fossils, a 6,700-acre (20 km) archeological district, a narrow gauge train, and traces of 6000 year old dwellings further enhance the offerings of Curecanti. There are three visitor centers within the recreation area, all operated by the National Park Service: There are also two marinas and five boat launches along the shores of Blue Mesa Reservoir. The Neversink trail is located nearest to Gunnison on the north bank of the Gunnison River near a Great Blue Heron rookery. This streamside habitat with its heavy undergrowth of grasses, flowers, cottonwoods, and willows, is ideal for birdwatching or just a quiet stroll. Length: 1.5 miles (round trip) Difficulty: easy This trail is flat and provides easy walking. It is also wheel chair accessible. Directions: off Hwy 50, 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Gunnison Ascending through sagebrush, ponderosa pine and
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Bandiagara Escarpment

    Bandiagara Escarpment

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    The Bandiagara Escarpment is an escarpment in the Dogon country of Mali. The sandstone cliff rises about 500 meters above the lower sandy flats to the south. It has a length of approximately 150 kilometers. The area of the escarpment is inhabited today by the Dogon people. Before the Dogon, the escarpment was inhabited by the Tellem and Toloy. Many structures remain from the Tellem. The Bandiagara Escarpment was listed in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1989. The Cliffs of Bandiagara are a sandstone chain ranging from south to northeast over 200 km and extending to the Grandamia massif. The end of the massif is marked by the Hombori Tondo, Mali's highest peak at 1,115 meters. Because of its archaeological, ethnological and geological characteristics, the entire site is one of the most imposing in West Africa. The cave-dwelling Tellem, an ethnic group later pushed out by the arrival of the Dogons, used to live in the slopes of the cliff. The Tellem legacy is evident in the caves they carved into the cliffs so that they could bury their dead high up, far from the frequent flash floods of the area. Dozens of villages are located along the cliff, such as Kani Bonzon. It was near to
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    Canyonlands National Park

    Canyonlands National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Canyonlands National Park is a U.S. National Park located in southeastern Utah near the town of Moab and preserves a colorful landscape eroded into countless canyons, mesas and buttes by the Colorado River, the Green River, and their respective tributaries. The park is divided into four districts: the Island in the Sky, the Needles, the Maze, and the rivers themselves. While these areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, each retains its own character. Two large river canyons are carved into the Colorado Plateau by the Colorado River and Green River. Author Edward Abbey, a frequent visitor, described the Canyonlands as "the most weird, wonderful, magical place on earth—there is nothing else like it anywhere." Canyonlands is a popular recreational destination. On average 440,039 people visited the park each year. The geography of the park is well suited to a number of different recreational uses. Hikers, mountain bikers, backpackers, and four-wheelers all enjoy traveling the rugged, remote trails within the Park. Rafters and kayakers float the calm stretches of the Green River and Colorado River above the confluence. Below the confluence Cataract Canyon contains powerful
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    Sawtooth Wilderness

    Sawtooth Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Sawtooth Wilderness (SAW-tooth) is a federally-protected wilderness area that covers 217,088 acres (87,852 ha) of the state of Idaho. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it was designated the Sawtooth Primitive Area in 1937 to preserve the exceptional scenic beauty of the Sawtooth Mountains. On August 22, 1972 Public Law 22-400 designated the Primitive Area as the Sawtooth Wilderness and part of the newly created Sawtooth National Recreation Area. As part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, the Sawtooth Wilderness is an area where human development and use are severely restricted and people are to remain only visitors. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Sawtooth Wilderness has some of the clearest air in the lower 48 states. Sawtooth National Forest was created as the Sawtooth Forest Reserve in the U.S. Department of Agriculture by proclamation of President Theodore Roosevelt on May 29, 1905. It was named after the Sawtooth Mountains in the northwestern part of the forest. On October 12, 1937, the U.S. Forest Service established the Sawtooth Primitive Area in the Sawtooth Mountains. Subsequently,
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    USCGC Duane

    USCGC Duane

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The USCGC Duane (WPG-33/WAGC-6/WHEC-33) (earlier known as the USCGC William J. Duane) was a cutter in the United States Coast Guard. Her keel was laid on May 1, 1935 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was launched on June 3, 1936 as a search and rescue and law enforcement vessel. The "Treasury" class Coast Guard cutters (sometimes referred to as the "Secretary" or 327-foot class) were all named for former Secretaries of the Treasury Department. The cutter Duane was named for William John Duane, who served as the third Secretary of the Treasury to serve under President Andrew Jackson. After fitting out, she departed the Philadelphia Navy Yard on October 16, 1936 and arrived at Oakland, California on November 24. She was then assigned to temporary duty in Honolulu, and arrived there on December 9, 1936, to participate in the U.S. colonization efforts of the Line Islands in the Pacific. The Duane then returned to her permanent homeport of Oakland, arriving on February 25, 1937. For the next two years, she joined the Bering Sea Patrol Force for annual cruises of that area. In mid-1937 her name was shortened to merely Duane. In September 1939 she was assigned
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    La Selva Protected Zone

    La Selva Protected Zone

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    La Selva Biological Station is a prominent ecology research station in Costa Rica, providing a facility of worldwide importance for tropical research. Located in Costa Rica's northeastern lowlands, La Selva includes a nature reserve that protects about 15 square kilometres (5.8 sq mi) of primary tropical rainforest. The forest is surrounded on the west, east, and north by pastures, farms, and other open areas, and its southern boundary adjoins Braulio Carrillo National Park making it a northern extension of the Central Volcanic Conservation Area. The research station is owned and operated by the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) and is their flagship field station. La Selva is about 2 hours' drive north of San José and about 5 minutes south of Puerto Viejo de Sarapiquí. It is close to the huge Braulio Carrillo National Park, which provides some continuity of habitat. A biological corridor composed of old-growth forest fragments and regenerating forests, purchased in the 1980s, now connects La Selva to Braulio Carrillo. This corridor connects La Selva to much higher elevations, making it the only station in Costa Rica to have habitats of such variability. The station is
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Saint Regis Canoe Area

    Saint Regis Canoe Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Saint Regis Canoe Area is a 19,000 acre (76 km²) area of the Adirondack Park in southern Franklin County, New York about 18 miles (29 km) northeast of Tupper Lake and southwest of Paul Smiths. It is the largest wilderness canoe area in the Northeast and the only designated canoe area in New York state; it is closed to motor vehicles, motor boats and aircraft. There are 58 ponds and the headwaters of the West and Middle Branch of the Saint Regis and the Saranac Rivers. Only two of the ponds can be reached without a carry. The area is noted for its beauty, wilderness and short canoe carries. Primitive canoe camping is permitted on many of the lakes and ponds. Saint Regis Mountain (2874 ft) and Long Pond Mountain (2530 ft) are within the Canoe Area. The trail to Long Pond Mountain can only be reached by water. Note: the put ins and take outs and the carry trails can be very muddy at any time of year, and black flies can be extremely active in the spring and early summer. There are also a number of unnamed ponds in the Canoe Area. Jamieson, Paul and Morris, Donald, Adirondack Canoe Waters, North Flow, Lake George, NY: Adirondack Mountain Club, 1987. ISBN 0-935272-43-7.
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Bacon and Tomlin, Inc.

    Bacon and Tomlin, Inc.

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Bacon and Tomlin, Inc. is a historic site in Sarasota, Florida, United States. It is located at 201 South Palm Avenue. On March 22, 1984, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Gauley River National Recreation Area

    Gauley River National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Gauley River National Recreation Area, located near Summersville, West Virginia, protects a 25-mile (40 km) portion of the Gauley River and a 5.5-mile (8.9 km) segment of the Meadow River in southern West Virginia. Little of the park is accessible via roads; one must travel via the river. At the upstream end of the park is the Summersville Dam, the only area of the park accessible by vehicle. Within the park are a number of Class V rapids. They have been given names such as:
    6.40
    5 votes
    45
    Lake Malawi National Park

    Lake Malawi National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Lake Malawi National Park is a national park located in Malawi at the southern end of Lake Malawi. It is the only national park in Malawi that was created to protect fish and aquatic habitats. Despite this, Lake Malawi National Park does include a fair amount of land, including several small islands in Lake Malawi, and is home to other animals such as baboons. A large baobab tree, purportedly over 800 years old, is said to have been a favourite of Dr. David Livingstone as a place where he could give sermons and speak with other missionaries. The graves of five early missionaries are also found in the park. The many endemic fish species make it a key example of specialized evolution. For this characteristic, it was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984. Fishes of Lake MAlawi 1. Fishes in Lake Malawi World’s Interest to Lake Malawi Lakes, rivers and oceans are three major environments that the fish lives. Since a lot of water is kept closed inside the lake, the environment of the lake does not change easily. It is also true, however, that the lake environment cannot be recovered easily once it is damaged. Life span of a lake is generally about some 10,000 years, for the
    5.50
    6 votes
    46
    Black Elk Wilderness

    Black Elk Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Black Elk Wilderness is located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. The wilderness was designated by an act of Congress in 1980. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Black Elk Wilderness is part of Black Hills National Forest. This 13,426 acre (54 km²) region is considered sacred to Native Americans, especially the Sioux and is named after Black Elk, an Oglala Sioux holy man. Mount Rushmore National Memorial is immediately to the north and much of the rest of the wilderness is bordered by other protected land under the jurisdiction of state and federal agencies. Harney Peak, which at 7,242 feet (2,207 m) is the tallest mountain in South Dakota, is located in the wilderness, and one can see into four different states from the summit. Craggy peaks and rocky slopes mixed with ponderosa pine, spruce and fir trees make for a varied ecosystem. Mountain goats and bighorn sheep inhabit the more rugged mountain slopes, while mule deer, elk and pronghorn are more common in the forested valleys. A sizeable population of hawks and falcons also inhabit the wilderness. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Point Reyes National Seashore

    Point Reyes National Seashore

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Point Reyes National Seashore is a 71,028-acre (287.44 km) park preserve located on the Point Reyes Peninsula in Marin County, California, USA. As a national seashore, it is maintained by the US National Park Service as a nationally important nature preserve within which existing agricultural uses are allowed to continue. Clem Miller, a US Congressman from Marin County wrote and introduced the bill for the establishment of Point Reyes National Seashore in 1962 to protect the peninsula from residential development which was proposed at the time for the slopes above Drake's Bay. Miller's vision included the continuation of the historic ranching and oyster farming along with the preservation of the grasslands and open scenic vistas. The mix of commercial and recreational uses was the reason the area was designated a National Seashore rather than a National Park. All of the park's beaches were listed as the cleanest in the state in 2010. Point Reyes was one of the locations where the 1980 horror film The Fog was filmed. The Point Reyes peninsula is a well defined area, geologically separated from the rest of Marin County and almost all of the continental United States by a rift zone of
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Yaquina Bay State Recreation Site

    Yaquina Bay State Recreation Site

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Yaquina Bay State Recreation Site, established in 1948, is a coastal state park in west-central Lincoln County, Oregon, United States, in the city of Newport. It is administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and located at the north end of Yaquina Bay near its outlet to the Pacific Ocean. The site includes picnic facilities, beach access, a fisherman's memorial shrine, a forested bluff and the historic Yaquina Bay Lighthouse.
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Chickasaw National Recreation Area

    Chickasaw National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Chickasaw National Recreation Area is a National Recreation Area situated in the foothills of the Arbuckle Mountains in south-central Oklahoma near Sulphur. Established as Sulphur Springs Reservation on July 1, 1902; renamed and redesignated Platt National Park on June 29, 1906; combined with the Arbuckle Recreation Area and additional lands and renamed and redesignated on 17 March 1976. Of the park's 9,888.83 acres (4,002 ha), water covers 2,409 acres (975 ha). The park contains many fine examples of 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps architecture. CCC workers created pavilions, park buildings, and enclosures for the park's many natural springs. The Chickasaw National Recreation Area preserves partially forested hills of south-central Oklahoma near Sulphur. Named to honor the Chickasaw Indian Nation, who were relocated to the area from the Southeastern United States during the 1830s (and who later sold the original 640 acres (260 ha) of land for the park to the Federal government), the park's springs, streams, and lakes provide swimming, boating, fishing, picnicking, camping, and hiking. As part of the Chickasaw tribe's arrangement with the U.S. government, the park does not
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Cook Forest State Park

    Cook Forest State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Cook Forest State Park is a 8,500-acre (3,440 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Farmington Township, Clarion County, Barnett Township, Forest County and Barnett Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is a heavily wooded area of rolling hills and mountains along the Clarion River in northwestern Pennsylvania. Cook Forest State Park is known for some of America's finest virgin white pine and hemlock timber stands and was once called the "Black Forest" due to the preponderance of evergreen tree coverage. Cook Forest is now a National Natural Landmark and was rated one of America's top 50 state parks by National Geographic Traveler magazine. It was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of "Twenty Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks". When European-Americans reached this part of Pennsylvania it was inhabited by the Seneca Nation of the Iroquois Confederacy. They used this area as a hunting grounds; the land of Cook Forest was then purchased by the English. Seneca Rock is still named after the first inhabitants, and the Paramount Pictures' film "Unconquered" was shot here in 1946 by
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Koli National Park

    Koli National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Koli National Park (Finnish: Kolin kansallispuisto) is a national park in the municipalities of Joensuu, Lieksa and Kontiolahti in the North Karelia region of Finland. It covers 30 square kilometres (12 sq mi) in the forested hills on the western shore of lake Pielinen, and was established in 1991. Contrary to the other national parks in Finland, Koli National Park was originally governed by the Finnish Forest Research Institute Metla. It is now governed by the Metsähallitus like the other national parks. Koli has lots to offer cultural heritage-wise. Formerly, it was a sacrificial site. Later it was used for slash-and-burn agriculture. The aim of Koli National Park isn't to reserve wild nature but traditional agricultural heritage is cherished in Koli. Some fields are slashed, burnt and re-cultivated and hay is cut yearly. Traditional Finnish breeds of cows and sheep are grazing in the meadows of Koli. The national park of Koli has been divided into three different zones according to central protection objectives. Attention is paid to a national landscape and geology in a zone which covers the highest tops of Koli. The culture zone is located quite near a village. In the culture
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Leivonmäki National Park

    Leivonmäki National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Leivonmäki National Park (Finnish: Leivonmäen kansallispuisto) is a national park in Central Finland. It was established in 2003 and covers 29 square kilometres (11 sq mi). Typical scenery consists of swamps, shores and esker forests. Media related to Leivonmäki National Park at Wikimedia Commons
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    Pulau Tiga National Park

    Pulau Tiga National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Pulau Tiga Park was established in 1978, although the area has been under protection as a forest reserve since 1933. It is located north of Kuala Penyu, opposite the swampy Klias Peninsula, in Sabah, east Malaysia on the island of Borneo. The park covers 158 square kilometers of mostly ocean, containing the 3 islands of Pulau Tiga, Pulau Kalampunian Besar and Pulau Kalampunian Damit. The islands were formed in 1897 by the eruption of mud volcanos. Pulau Tiga is now covered in dense vegetation; however volcanic activity continues in the form of bubbling mud and methane gas venting, although the last major outpouring of mud was in the early 1960s. Pulau Kalampunian Besar is now little more than a sandbar, eroded away by wave action. Known for its sugar-white sands and clear waters, it is popular for scuba diving and snorkeling. It was also the location of both the US and UK versions of the reality TV show Survivor. Pulau Kalampunian Damit, little more than a large rock, is also called Pulau Ular (Snake Island). It is famous as a mating location for highly poisonous sea snakes. Pulau Tiga Park is administered by Sabah Parks. Media related to Pulau Tiga National Park at Wikimedia
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    Gallitzin State Forest

    Gallitzin State Forest

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Gallitzin State Forest is a Pennsylvania State Forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #6. The main offices are located in Ebensburg in Cambria County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The forest is located on 15,336 acres (6,206 ha) in two tracts. The largest tract of 13,482 acres (5,456 ha) is the 'Babcock Division' in northern Somerset and northwestern Bedford Counties. The other, smaller tract of 1,854 acres (750 ha) is in northern Cambria and Indiana Counties. District #6 also includes Blair County. Gallitzin State Forest was named to honor Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. Gallitzin was a Roman Catholic priest and is called The Apostle of the Alleghenies for his pioneering mission work in the area in the early 19th century. Gallitzin State Forest was formed as a direct result of the depletion of the forests of Pennsylvania that took place during the mid-to-late 19th century. Conservationists like Dr. Joseph Rothrock became concerned that the forests would not regrow if they were not managed properly. Lumber and Iron companies had harvested the old-growth forests for various reasons. The clear cut the forests and left behind nothing but dried tree tops and rotting
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Big Basin Redwoods State Park

    Big Basin Redwoods State Park

    • System: California Department of Parks and Recreation
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: California Department of Parks and Recreation
    Big Basin Redwoods State Park is a state park in the U.S. state of California, located in Santa Cruz County, about 36 km (22 mi) northwest of Santa Cruz. The park contains almost all of the Waddell Creek watershed, which was formed by the seismic uplift of its rim, and the erosion of its center by the many streams in its bowl-shaped depression. Big Basin is California's oldest State Park, established in 1902. Its original 3,800 acres (15 km) have been increased over the years to over 18,000 acres (73 km). It is part of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion and is home to the largest continuous stand of ancient Coast Redwoods south of San Francisco. It contains 10,800 acres (44 km) of old-growth forest as well as recovering redwood forest, with mixed conifer, oaks, chaparral and riparian habitats. Elevations in the park vary from sea level to over 600 m (2,000 ft). The climate ranges from foggy and damp near the ocean to sunny, warm ridge tops. The park has over 130 km (81 mi) of trails. Some of these trails link Big Basin to Castle Rock State Park and the eastern reaches of the Santa Cruz range. The Skyline-to-the-Sea Trail threads its way through the park along Waddell
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Cape Krusenstern National Monument

    Cape Krusenstern National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Cape Krusenstern National Monument and the colocated Cape Krusenstern Archeological District is a U.S. National Monument and a National Historic Landmark centered on Cape Krusenstern in northwestern Alaska. Founded on December 1, 1978, it is made up mainly of a coastal plain, containing large lagoons and rolling hills of limestone. The bluffs record thousands of years of change in the shorelines of the Chukchi Sea, as well as evidence of some 9,000 years of human habitation. The archeological district comprises 114 ancient beach ridges which formed approximately 60 years apart. They provide a rare sequential look at over 5000 years of inhabitation. The area in the National Historic Landmark District is vast, making this one of the very largest NHLs in the U.S., along with the Adirondack Park.
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Fort Pierce Inlet State Park

    Fort Pierce Inlet State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Fort Pierce Inlet State Park, a 340-acre (1.4 km) part of the Florida State Park system, is located just north of the Fort Pierce Inlet, on North Hutchinson Island, near Fort Pierce. It consists of beaches, dunes and coastal hammock between the Atlantic Ocean and the waters of Tucker Cove, an indentation of the Indian River Lagoon. The primary use of the park is as a recreation area. Activities include fishing, swimming, surfing, picnicking, hiking, and birding as well as scuba diving, snorkeling, and youth camping. Amenities include a half-mile beach, primitive youth/group campground, a paved bike path, playground, picnic area, a nature trail, and a reef about 100 yards (91 m) from the beach. Jack Island State Preserve, located a mile north of Fort Pierce Inlet State Park on State Road A1A is under the same manager as the state park. Jack Island features trails for hiking, biking, and studying nature. At the west end of its Marsh Rabbit Run Trail, there is an observation tower that affords spectacular views of the Indian River as well as Jack Island itself. At present Jack Island State preserve is closed. The footbridge to Jack Island is unsound and has been closed indefinitely
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    President's Park

    President's Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    President's Park, located in Washington, D.C., encompasses the White House, a visitor center, Lafayette Square, and The Ellipse. President's Park was the original name of Lafayette Square. The current President's Park is administered by the National Park Service. Washington, D.C. was designated as the site for the United States capital in the 1790 Residence Act, with authority given to President George Washington to ready the capital for the government by 1800. Contests were held to solicit votes for both the United States Capitol and the President's residence. James Hoban's design was selected, and he supervised the construction. Later on, the White House was expanded with the West Wing, which now houses the office of the president and staff. The White House grounds include the South Lawn, Rose Garden, Jacqueline Kennedy Garden, and North Lawn. Lafayette Square is a seven-acre (30,000 m²) public park located directly north of the White House on H Street, bounded by Jackson Place on the west, Madison Place on the east, and Pennsylvania Avenue. The square and the surrounding structures were designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1970. Planned as part of the pleasure
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Susquehanna State Park

    Susquehanna State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Susquehanna State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 20 acres (8.1 ha) in Williamsport in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is on the West Branch Susquehanna River in the western part of Williamsport, and is operated by the Williamsport / Lycoming Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with the Bureau of State Parks of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Susquehanna State Park offers cruises on a paddlewheeler, boating, fishing, and picnicking. The park land was originally part of the West Branch Division of the Pennsylvania Canal, which ran along the left bank of the West Branch from Susquehanna River from Northumberland to Lock Haven. The canal was in operation here from October 15, 1834 to July 1, 1889, when a major flood destroyed it. The Susquehanna Boom was a system of cribs and chained logs in the West Branch Susquehanna River, designed to catch and hold floating timber until it could be processed at one of the nearly 60 sawmills along the river between Lycoming and Loyalsock Creeks in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in the United States. Susquehanna State Park is located within just a small section of what was once the
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Piscataway Park

    Piscataway Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Piscataway Park, located 20 miles (32 km) southwest of downtown Washington, D.C., near Accokeek, Maryland, protects Marshall Hall the National Colonial Farm, and the Accokeek Creek Site. The park is located across the Potomac River from George Washington's Mount Vernon estate. Piscataway Park is named after Piscataway Creek, itself named for a historic Native American tribe. The park is home to bald eagles, beavers, osprey, and other wildlife and encompasses areas of wetland, meadow and woodland. It is administered by the National Park Service and is managed by National Capital Parks-East. Henry and Alice Ferguson bought more than 100 acres (0.40 km) of land in the area in 1928. It includes the area of Moyaone, a Native American Piscataway village last occupied in 1623. The Fergusons bought more property and encouraged friends to settle nearby, where they could protect the environment. After Alice's death in 1951, Ferguson created the Alice Ferguson Foundation, which administered the land. The foundation made arrangements to donate property to the National Park Service for parkland, a transaction completed in the 1960s. This both protected the environment, as well as the "historic
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Tarangire National Park

    Tarangire National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Tarangire National Park is a national park in Tanzania. Tarangire National Park is the sixth largest national park in Tanzania after Ruaha, Serengeti, Mikumi, Katavi and Mkomazi. The name of the park originates from the Tarangire river that crosses through the park, being the only source of water for wild animals during dry seasons. During the dry season thousands of animals migrate to the Tarangire National Park from Manyara. It lies a little distance to the south east of Lake Manyara and covers an area of approximately 2,850 square kilometers(1,100 square miles.) The landscape and vegetation is incredibly diverse with a mix that is not found anywhere else in the northern safari circuit. The hilly landscape is dotted with vast numbers of Baobab trees, dense bush and high grasses. The park is famous for its huge number of elephants, baobab trees and tree climbing lions. Visitors to the park can expect to see any number of resident zebra and wildebeest in addition to the less common animals. Other common animals include waterbuck, giraffe, and olive baboons. Home to more than 550 species, the park is a haven for bird enthusiasts who can expect so see dozens of species even in the
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Upemba National Park

    Upemba National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Upemba National Park is a large park in the Katanga province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Located in a lush area dotted by lakes, including the eponymous Lake Upemba, and bordered by the Lualaba River, its 11,730 km² dominates the Kibara Plateau. The Upemba National Park was first established in 1939. It is home to some 1,800 different species, some of them discovered as late as 2003. There are also a handful of villages in the park. In recent years, the park has come under considerable attack from poachers and local militias. On 28 May 2004, for instance, the park headquarters in Lusinga came under attack by the Mai Mai militia. Several wardens and their families were killed, the headquarters were burned down, and the family of the chief warden was taken hostage. As with much of the wildlife of the region, the park continues to be threatened by the activities of poachers, pollution and the activities of refugees and militia. On 1 June 2005, the protectors of the park received the Abraham Conservation Award for their role in protecting the rich biodiversity of the Congo River basin. Upemba National Park is located between Latitude 9°5’ and 8°45’ South and Longitude 25°50’
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Bandipur National Park

    Bandipur National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Bandipur National Park (ಕನ್ನಡ: ಬ೦ಡಿಪುರ), established in 1973 as a tiger reserve under Project Tiger, is a national park located in the south Indian state of Karnataka. It was once a private hunting reserve for the Maharaja of the Kingdom of Mysore. Bandipur is known for its wildlife and has many types of biomes, but dry deciduous forest is dominant. The park spans an area of 874 square kilometers (337 sq mi), protecting several species of India's endangered wildlife. Together with the adjoining Nagarhole National Park (643 km (248 sq mi)), Mudumalai National Park (320 km (120 sq mi)) and Wynad Wildlife Sanctuary (344 km (133 sq mi)), it is part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve totaling 2,183 km (843 sq mi) making it the largest protected area in southern India. Bandipur is located in Gundlupet taluq of Chamarajanagar district. It is about 80 kilometers (50 mi) from the city of Mysore on the route to a major tourist destination of Ooty. As a result, Bandipur sees a lot of tourist traffic and there are a lot of wildlife fatalities caused by speeding vehicles that are reported each year. There is a ban on traffic from the hours of dusk to dawn to help bring down deaths of
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Yosemite National Park

    Yosemite National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Yosemite National Park ( /joʊˈsɛmɨtiː/ yoh-SEM-it-ee) is a United States National Park spanning eastern portions of Tuolumne, Mariposa and Madera counties in the central eastern portion of California, United States. The park covers an area of 761,268 acres (3,080.74 km) and reaches across the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountain chain. Over 3.7 million people visit Yosemite each year: most spend their time in the seven square miles (18 km) of Yosemite Valley. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is internationally recognized for its spectacular granite cliffs, waterfalls, clear streams, Giant Sequoia groves, and biological diversity. Almost 95% of the park is designated wilderness. Although not the first designated national park, Yosemite was central to the development of the national park idea, largely owing to the work of people like Galen Clark and John Muir. Yosemite is one of the largest and least fragmented habitat blocks in the Sierra Nevada, and the park supports a diversity of plants and animals. The park has an elevation range from 2,127 to 13,114 feet (648 to 3,997 m) and contains five major vegetation zones: chaparral/oak woodland, lower montane
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Daisen-Oki National Park

    Daisen-Oki National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Daisen-Oki National Park (大山隠岐国立公園, Daisen Oki Kokuritsu Kōen) is a national park in the Chūgoku region, Honshū, Japan, and spans the prefectures of Okayama, Shimane, and Tottori. Mount Daisen is the focus of the park, which also includes the volcanic mountains and plains of Hiruzen, Mount Kenashi, Mount Sanbe, and Mount Hōbutsu. The Izumo Plain region of the park is home to the oldest Shinto shrine in Japan, the Izumo-taisha. The Oki Islands are also an important component of the park. The park was established in 1936 as Daisen National Park (大山国立公園, Daisen Oki Kokuritsu Kōen), but was expanded and renamed in 1961 to include the Oki Islands and Shimane Prefecture areas.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Pacaya–Samiria National Reservation

    Pacaya–Samiria National Reservation

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Pacaya–Samiria National Reservation is located in the Loreto Region of Peru. Its main purpose is to preserve the ecosystems of the Omagua Region and to promote the indigenous towns. More information visit the Spanish Wikipedia article http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserva Nacional Pacaya Samiria.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    The Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge is a 35,000 acre (142 km) National Wildlife Refuge located along the Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. Named after Major General Joseph Wheeler, it was established to provide a habitat for wintering and migrating birds in the eastern United States. Of the 35,000 acres (142 km) of the refuge, about 4,085 acres (16.5 km) are located within Redstone Arsenal. Approximately 1,500 acres (6 km) of the Redstone Arsenal land is administered by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The facility has a sixteen person staff with a $1,694,000 annual budget. Wheeler NWR is charged with the administration of four other National Wildlife Refuges including Fern Cave, Key Cave, Sauta Cave, and the Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge. Until recently, Wheeler NWR also administered the Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge (now administered by the Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge). In 1934, the Tennessee Valley Authority began purchasing land as a bed for and buffer strip for Wheeler Reservoir. By 1936, the Tennessee River was impounded for flood control with the nearby Wheeler Dam providing hydroelectric power. In 1938, the Refuge was established
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park

    Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park is in the South Island of New Zealand near the town of Twizel. Aoraki/Mount Cook, New Zealand's highest mountain and Aoraki/Mount Cook village lie within the park. The area was gazetted as a national park in October 1953 and consists of reserves that were established as early as 1887 to protect the area's significant vegetation and landscape. The park covers a little over 700 km². Glaciers cover 40% of the park area, notably the Tasman Glacier on the slopes of Aoraki/Mt Cook. Of New Zealand's 20 peaks over 3,000 metres, all except Mount Aspiring / Tititea lie in the park. These include New Zealand's highest mountain, Aoraki/Mt Cook, at 3753 metres. Other prominent peaks include Mt Tasman, Mt Hicks, Mt Sefton and Mt Elie de Beaumont. The mountains of the Southern Alps in general are young, less than ten million years old, and are still building. Uplift in the region of the national park is at the rate of 5-10mm per year. It's estimated that approximately 25 km of uplift has occurred, however the rate of uplift has been countered by erosion. The park borders Westland Tai Poutini National Park along the Main Divide. Together they form part of Te
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Bitterroot Range

    Bitterroot Range

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Bitterroot Range is a mountain range and a subrange of the Rocky Mountains that runs along the border of Montana and Idaho in the northwestern United States. The range spans an area of 62,736 square kilometers (24,223 sq mi) and is named after the bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva), a small pink flower that is the state flower of Montana. In 1805, the Corps of Discovery, led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and aided by the Shoshone Native American tribe, crossed the Bitterroot Range several times. Lewis first crossed the mountains at Lemhi Pass on August 12, then returned across the pass to meet Clark. The entire expedition then crossed the pass to the Salmon River valley, and the next month entered the Bitterroot Valley from the south via either Lost Trail Pass or Chief Joseph Pass. It then crossed Lolo Pass to the west. According to the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, the Bitterroot Range runs from Pend Oreille Lake (near Sandpoint, Idaho) to Monida Pass,. It is sometimes considered to extend east of the Monida Pass to include the Centennial Mountains. The range comprises the following subranges (from north to south): The Coeur d'Alène Mountains are the northwestern-most
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Chase Lake Wetland Management District

    Chase Lake Wetland Management District

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    Chase Lake Wetland Management District is located in the U.S. state of North Dakota. The district is located in what is known as the prairie–potholes region of lakes and ponds, which were left behind by the retreat of glaciers at the end of the last ice age. Hundreds of waterfowl production areas, Wildlife Development Areas, wetland easements (private land managed by the government), grassland easements and the easement refuge known as Halfway Lake National Wildlife Refuge, are managed by the district. The district is a part of the Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge Complex. In the district, hundreds of thousands of birds either migrate through the region or stay and nest every year. Important waterfowl include the American white pelican whose numbers in the district are higher than in any other protected region in North America. Tundra swans, canada geese, bitterns, wood ducks, black-crowned night herons, pintails, franklin's gull and the great blue heron are but a sampling of the 250 species of birds that have been identified on the refuge. White-tailed deer, muskrat, beaver, raccoon and skunk are but a few of the 40 mammal species that have been documented. The district permits
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Fort Zachary Taylor

    Fort Zachary Taylor

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site, better known simply as Fort Taylor (or Fort Zach to locals) is a Florida State Park and National Historic Landmark centered on a Civil War-era fort located near the southern tip of Key West, Florida. Construction of the fort began in 1845 as part of a mid-19th century plan to defend the southeast coast through a series of forts. The fort was named for United States President Zachary Taylor in 1850, a few months after President Taylor's sudden death in office. Yellow fever epidemics and material shortages slowed construction of the fort, which continued throughout the 1850s. At the outset of the U.S. Civil War in 1861, Union Captain John Milton Brannan seized control of the fort, preventing it from falling into Confederate hands and using it as an outpost to threaten blockade runners. Originally, the fort was surrounded by water on all sides, with a walkway linking it to the mainland. The fort was completed in 1866, although the upper level of one side was destroyed in 1889 to make way for more modern weapons, with the older cannons being buried within the new outer wall to save on materials. The fort was heavily used again during the
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Kingsley Plantation

    Kingsley Plantation

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Kingsley Plantation (also known as the Zephaniah Kingsley Plantation Home and Buildings) is the site of a former estate in Jacksonville, Florida, that was named for an early owner, Zephaniah Kingsley, who spent 25 years there. It is located at the northern tip of Fort George Island at Fort George Inlet, and is part of the Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve managed by the U.S. National Park Service. The plantation was originally 1,000 acres (4.0 km), most of which has been taken over by forest; the structures and grounds of the park now comprise approximately 60 acres (240,000 m). Evidence of Pre-Columbian Timucua life is on the island, as are the remains of a Spanish mission named San Juan del Puerto. Under British rule in 1765, a plantation was established that cycled through several owners while Florida was transferred back to Spain and then the United States. The longest span of ownership was under Kingsley and his family, a polygamous and multiracial household controlled by and resistant to the issues of race and slavery. Free blacks and several private owners lived at the plantation until it was transferred to the State of Florida in 1955. It was acquired by the
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Mission Mountains Wilderness

    Mission Mountains Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Mission Mountains Wilderness is located in the U.S. state of Montana. Created by an act of Congress in 1975, the wilderness is within the Swan Lake Ranger District of the Flathead National Forest. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with proper permit, no roads or buildings are constructed and there is also no logging or mining, in compliance with the 1964 Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas within National Forests and Bureau of Land Management areas also allow hunting in season. The wilderness can be reached by trail from surrounding roads. Primary access is via Montana highway 83 and logging roads to the east, but there are several western routes leading from the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe's adjoining Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness. The wilderness is approximately 80 miles (128 km) north of Missoula, Montana and 65 miles (105 km) south-east of Kalispell, Montana.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument

    Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument is a U.S. National Monument that includes the area around Mount St. Helens in Washington. It was established on August 27, 1982 by U.S. President Ronald Reagan following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The 110,000 acre (445 km) National Volcanic Monument was set-aside for research, recreation, and education. Inside the Monument, the environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance. Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument was the United States' first such monument managed by the United States Forest Service. At dedication ceremonies on May 18, 1983, Max Peterson, head of the USFS, said,"we can take pride in having preserved the unique episode of natural history for future generations." Since then, many trails, viewpoints, information stations, campgrounds, and picnic areas have been established to accommodate the increasing number of visitors each year. Beginning in the summer of 1983, visitors have been able to drive to Windy Ridge, only 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of the crater. Mountain climbing to the summit of the volcano has been allowed since 1986. A visitor center was completed in December 1986 at Silver Lake,
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Patvinsuo National Park

    Patvinsuo National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Patvinsuo National Park (Finnish: Patvinsuon kansallispuisto) is a national park in the North Karelia region of Finland, in the municipalities of Lieksa and Ilomantsi. It was established in 1982 and covers 105 square kilometres (41 sq mi). There are 80 kilometres (50 mi) of marked walking trails in the area. Media related to Patvinsuo National Park at Wikimedia Commons
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Royal Bardia National Park

    Royal Bardia National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Bardiya National Park is a protected area in Nepal that was established in 1988 as Royal Bardia National Park. Covering an area of 968 km (374 sq mi) it is the largest and most undisturbed wilderness area in Nepal's Terai, adjoining the eastern bank of the Karnali River in the Bardiya District. The northern limits of the protected area are demarcated by the crest of the Siwalik Hills. The Nepalgunj-Surkhet highway partly forms the southern boundary, but seriously disrupts the protected area. Natural boundaries to human settlements are formed in the west by the Geruwa, a branch of the Karnali River, and in the southeast by the Babai River. Together with the neighboring Banke National Park, the coherent protected area of 1,437 km (555 sq mi) represents the Tiger Conservation Unit (TCU) Bardia-Banke that extends over 2,231 km (861 sq mi) of alluvial grasslands and subtropical moist deciduous forests. Listen to pronunciation of Bardiya National Park's local name  बर्दिया राष्ट्रिय निकुञ्ज (help·info) In 1815, Nepal lost this region to the East India Company through the Sugauli Treaty. For 45 years it was a part of British India and returned to Nepal in 1860 in recognition for
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

    Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway is a federally protected system of riverways located in eastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin. It protects 252 miles (406 km) of river, including the St. Croix River (on the Wisconsin/Minnesota border), and the Namekagon River (in Wisconsin), as well as adjacent land along the rivers. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway is one of the original eight National Wild and Scenic Rivers, largely as a result of legislation by Senator Walter Mondale (MN) and moreso by Senator Gaylord Nelson (WI). The largest scenic riverway east of the Mississippi River, it lies within parts of eight counties in Wisconsin: Bayfield, Burnett, Douglas, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix, Sawyer, and Washburn; and three in Minnesota: Chisago, Pine, and Washington. The upper St. Croix is a nationally renowned smallmouth bass fishery. Other fish species present in the riverway include walleye, northern pike, sturgeon, muskellunge, and catfish. The Namekagon River upstream of Hayward, Wisconsin is well known for its brown and brook trout fishing. Besides fishing, the riverway is a popular destination for canoeing, boating, camping, tubing, and hunting. Camping is provided
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Dolly Sods Wilderness

    Dolly Sods Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Dolly Sods Wilderness — originally simply Dolly Sods — is a U.S. Wilderness Area in the Allegheny Mountains of eastern West Virginia, USA, and is part of the Monongahela National Forest (MNF) of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). Dolly Sods is a rocky, high-altitude plateau with sweeping vistas and lifeforms normally found much farther north in Canada. To the north, the distinctive landscape of "the Sods" is characterized by stunted (“flagged”) trees, wind-carved boulders, heath barrens, grassy meadows created in the last century by logging and fires, and sphagnum bogs that are much older. To the south, dense cove forest occupies the branched canyon excavated by the North Fork of Red Creek. The name derives from an 18th century German homesteading family — the Dahles — and a local term for an open mountaintop meadow — a "sods". Dolly Sods is the highest plateau of its type east of the Mississippi River with altitude ranging from around 2,700 feet (820 m) at the outlet of Red Creek to about 4,000 feet (1,200 m) at the top of a mountain ridge on the Allegheny Front. Prominent summits within the Wilderness are Coal Knob (3,766 feet), Breathed Mountain (3,848 feet), and Blackbird Knob
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Fort Knox

    Fort Knox

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Fort Knox, now Fort Knox State Park or Fort Knox State Historic Site, in Maine was built from 1844-1869. It is located on the western bank of the Penobscot River in the town of Prospect, Maine, about 5 miles (8.0 km) from the mouth of the river. It was the first fort in Maine built of granite (instead of wood). It is named after Henry Knox, the first US Secretary of War, who at the end of his life lived not far away in Thomaston, Maine. The fort was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970. Construction began during a period of tension between the United Kingdom and the United States over issues about the Canadian border following the Aroostook War. The intent was to defend the Penobscot River and Bangor, Maine, a major source of shipbuilding lumber. Construction funding from Congress was intermittent, and the fort's design was never fully completed although nearly a million dollars were spent. Granite was quarried five miles (8 km) upriver from Mount Waldo in Frankfort, Maine. It had two batteries facing the river, each equipped with a hot shot furnace to heat cannon shots hot enough to set ships on fire. These became obsolete with the changeover from wooden ships to
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Georgian Bay Islands National Park

    Georgian Bay Islands National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Parks Canada
    Georgian Bay Islands National Park consists of 63 small islands or parts of islands in Georgian Bay, near Port Severn, Ontario. The park was established in 1929. The total park area is approximately 13.5 km². Prior to the creation of Fathom Five National Marine Park, Flowerpot Island was also a part of the park. The islands blend the exposed rocks and pines of the Canadian Shield with the hardwood forests found further south. The park can only be reached by boat; there are limited camping facilities on the largest island, Beausoleil Island. The park provides habitat for 33 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the threatened eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake. Some of the more isolated islands provide nesting areas for colonies of gulls and terns. The park is part of the Georgian Bay Littoral Biosphere Reserve. Beausoleil Island is the largest island in the park and it offers island tent camping, overnight and day docking, heritage education programs, and hiking trails. Wheelchair accessible sites and reserved campsites are also available at the Cedar Spring campground on Beausoleil Island.
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers in and around Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. The park includes land in Jefferson County, West Virginia; Washington County, Maryland and Loudoun County, Virginia. The park is managed by the National Park Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior. Originally designated as a National Monument in 1944, the park was declared a National Historical Park by the U.S. Congress in 1963. The park includes the historic town of Harpers Ferry, notable as a center of 19th century industry and as the scene of John Brown's abolitionist uprising. Consisting of almost 4,000 acres (16 km), the landmarks the site on which Thomas Jefferson once said, "The passage of the Patomac through the Blue Ridge is perhaps one of the most stupendous scenes in Nature" after visiting the area in 1783. Due to a mixture of historical events and ample recreational opportunities, all within 50 miles (80 km) of Washington, D.C., the park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. Native American history in the region dates back to at least 8,000 years ago. The Tuscarora
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Lava Beds National Monument

    Lava Beds National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Lava Beds National Monument is located in northeastern California, in Siskiyou and Modoc Counties. The Monument lies on the northeastern flank of the Medicine Lake Volcano, with the largest total area covered by a volcano in the Cascade Range. The region in and around Lava Beds Monument is unique because it lies on the junction of the Sierra-Klamath, Cascade, and the Great Basin physiographic provinces. The Monument was established as a United States National Monument on November 21, 1925, including over 46,000 acres (190 km). Lava Beds National Monument has numerous lava tube caves, with twenty five having marked entrances and developed trails for public access and exploration. The monument also offers trails through the high Great Basin xeric shrubland desert landscape and the volcanic fields. Lava Beds National Monument is geologically outstanding because of its great variety of "textbook" volcanic formations including: lava tube caves; fumaroles; cinder cones; spatter cones; pit craters; hornitos; maars; and lava flows and volcanic fields Volcanic eruptions on the Medicine Lake Shield volcano have created an incredibly rugged landscape punctuated by these many landforms of
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    El Malpais National Monument

    El Malpais National Monument

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    El Malpais National Monument is a National Monument located in western New Mexico, in the Southwestern United States. The name El Malpais is from the Spanish term Malpaís, meaning badlands, due to the extremely barren and dramatic volcanic field that covers much of the park's area. El Malpais is part of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, the second largest volcanic field in the Basin and Range Province. The rugged Pahoehoe lava flow filled a large basin rimmed by higher sandstone bluffs, now large wind and water rounded and lighter colored contrasting landforms that surround much of the darker malpais. The park has many inactive volcanoes, some potentially active volcanoes, and in the area geothermal activity. Some of the oldest Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga) trees on the planet, of the Pseudotsuga subspecies Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii subsp. glauca), are living in El Malpais Monument. The area around El Malpais was used for resources, settlement, and travel by Oasisamerica cultures, Native Americans, and Spanish colonial and pioneer exploration. Archaeological sites remain in the park. In the 1940s the malpais lava field was one of the eight candidate sites
    5.60
    5 votes
    84
    Allegheny Portage Railroad

    Allegheny Portage Railroad

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Allegheny Portage Railroad was the first railroad constructed through the Allegheny Mountains in central Pennsylvania, United States. It was a series of 10 inclines, approximately 36 miles (58 km) long, and operated from 1834 to 1854. It connected two canal divisions of the Main Line of Public Works of the Pennsylvania Canal from Johnstown on the west to Hollidaysburg on the east, thus allowing continuous barge traffic between the Ohio and the Susquehanna rivers. Considered a technological marvel in its day, it played a critical role in opening the interior of the United States beyond the Appalachian Mountains to settlement and commerce. It included the first railroad tunnel in the United States, the Staple Bend Tunnel, and its inauguration was marked with great fanfare. Today, the remains of the railroad are preserved within the Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site operated by the National Park Service. The site was established on 1,296 acres (524 ha) in 1964 and is about 12 miles (19.3 km) west of Altoona, in Blair and Cambria counties. The Lemon House, a tavern located alongside the railroad near Cresson that was a popular stop for railroad passengers, has been
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Bon Echo Provincial Park

    Bon Echo Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Bon Echo Provincial Park is a provincial park in South Central Ontario north of Kaladar, Ontario, approximately 6 km north of Cloyne. Bon Echo features several lakes, including part of Mazinaw Lake, the second-deepest lake in Ontario. The southeastern shore of Mazinaw Lake features the massive 100 m high Mazinaw Rock, an escarpment rising out of the water with many native pictographs. The unofficial mascot of Bon Echo Park is the Ojibwe trickster figure and culture hero, Nanabush, who is among the pictographs found in the area. Pictographs are often confused with petroglyphs, which are rock carvings rather than the over 260 rock paintings found on Mazinaw. The site of the Mazinaw pictographs was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1982. The Bon Echo region - after enterprising lumbering companies came and went, along with the farming communities that accompanied them - was purchased in 1889 by Dr. Weston A. Price and his wife, who were inspired by the majesty of Mazinaw Rock and the surrounding area. They named the area 'Bon Echo' because of the acoustical properties of the Rock, bouncing sound across Mazinaw Lake. There on the narrows, the Prices built a large,
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Corcovado National Park

    Corcovado National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Corcovado National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Corcovado) is a National Park on the Osa Peninsula in southwestern Costa Rica (9° North, 83° West), which is part of the Osa Conservation Area. It was established on 24 October 1975, and encompasses an area of 425 km² (263 mi²). It is widely considered the crown jewel in the extensive system of national parks and biological reserves spread across the country. The ecological variety is quite stunning. National Geographic has called it "the most biologically intense place on Earth in terms of biodiversity". Not only is the park very popular with tropical ecologists, a visitor can expect to see an abundance of wildlife. One should come well prepared though (see below). The park conserves the largest primary forest on the American Pacific coastline and one of the few remaining sizeable areas of lowland tropical rainforests in the world. Logging usually takes place in lowland areas because those areas are more accessible and contain the largest and most economically valuable trees. But those habitats are also usually the richest in biodiversity. So even though still approximately half the tropical rainforests on Earth remain, what is
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Okapi Wildlife Reserve

    Okapi Wildlife Reserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Okapi Wildlife Reserve is a World Heritage Site in the Ituri Forest in the north-east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, near the borders with Sudan and Uganda. At approximately 14,000 km², it covers approximately one fifth of the area of the forest. The Nepoko, Ituri and Epulu rivers flow through the reserve. The imposing Mbiya Mountain overlooks the Epulu village. The reserve is home to about 5,000 okapi, 4,000 elephants, 2,000 leopards, chimpanzees and crocodiles. Other Ituri rain forest animals include forest buffalo, water chevrotain, and forest elephants. The reserve has over 300 species of bird, and is one of the most important sites for bird conservation in mainland Africa. Nomadic Mbuti pygmies and indigenous Bantu farmers also live within the reserve. The Okapi Wildlife Reserve was created with the help of the Okapi Conservation Project in 1992. The project continues to support the reserve by training and equipping wildlife guards and by providing assistance to improve the lives of neighboring communities. The Okapi Wildlife Reserve was added to the list of world heritage sites in danger in 1997. The main threats to the reserve are deforestation, primarily
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument

    Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument is a National Monument in Southern California. It includes portions of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountain ranges, the northernmost ones of the Peninsular Ranges system. The national monument covers portions of Riverside County, west of the Coachella Valley, approximately 100 miles (160 km) southeast of downtown Los Angeles. The Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument was established in October 2000, through Congressional legislation (Public Law 106-351). It covers an area of 252,000 acres (1,020 km). It is administered jointly by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service—San Bernardino National Forest (SBNF). Many flora and fauna species within the national monument are state and federal listed threatened or endangered species, including the Peninsular Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis cremnobates), a subspecies endemic to the Peninsular Ranges. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians own substantial acreage within the monument, are one of the managing agencies, and have historic cultural sites and interests throughout the mountains. More than 200 cultural resources have been
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Tahquamenon Falls State Park

    Tahquamenon Falls State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Tahquamenon Falls State Park is a 46,179-acre (186.9 km²) state park in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is the second largest of Michigan's state parks. Bordering on Lake Superior, most of the park is located within Whitefish Township in Chippewa County, with the western section of the park extending into McMillan Township in Luce County. The nearest town of any size is Paradise. Tahquamenon Falls State Park follows the Tahquamenon River as it passes over Tahquamenon Falls and drains into Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior. The Tahquamenon Falls include a single 50-foot (15-meter) drop, the Upper Falls, plus the cascades and rapids collectively called the Lower Falls. During the late-spring runoff, the river drains as much as 50,000 gallons (200,000 liters) of water per second, making the upper falls the second most voluminous vertical waterfall east of the Mississippi River, after only Niagara Falls. The North Country Trail passes through the park. There is a seasonal shuttle service that allows hikers to walk between upper falls and lower falls without doubling back, the Tahqua Trekker. Tahquamenon Falls is also called "Rootbeer Falls" because of its golden-brown color, caused by
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Abel Tasman National Park

    Abel Tasman National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Abel Tasman National Park is a national park located at the north end of the South Island of New Zealand. The park was founded in 1942, largely through the efforts of ornithologist and author Perrine Moncrieff to have land reserved for the purpose. With a coverage of only 225.3 km (87.0 sq mi), is the smallest of New Zealand's national parks. The park consists of forested, hilly country to the north of the valleys of the Takaka and Riwaka Rivers, and is bounded to the north by the waters of Golden Bay and Tasman Bay. It is named after Abel Tasman, who in 1642 became the first European explorer to sight New Zealand. Abel Tasman National Park does not extend beyond Mean High Water Mark on the adjacent coast. Between Mean High Water and Mean Low Water Springs, the beaches are gazetted as a Scenic Reserve, covering 7.74 km (2.99 sq mi) in total. The Tonga Island Marine Reserve adjoins part of the park. Department of Conservation administers the National Park. The Scenic Reserve is administered by the Tasman District Council (TDC) Chief Executive and Department of Conservation’s Nelson/ Marlborough Conservator. Activities in adjoining coastal waters are TDC’s responsibility. These areas
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Arenal Volcano National Park

    Arenal Volcano National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Arenal Volcano National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Volcán Arenal) is a Costa Rican national park in the central part of the country, forming the Arenal Tilaran Conservation Area. The park encompasses the Arenal Volcano, the most active in the country, which had previously been believed to be dormant until a major eruption in 1968. It neighbours Lake Arenal, which is the site of the country's largest hydroelectricity project, the Lake Arenal Dam. The park also contains a second volcano, Chato, whose crater contains a lagoon. It is also called Cerro Chato (literally Mount Chato) as it has been inactive for around 3500 years–coinciding with the creation and growth of Arenal itself. The site has accommodation in the form of the Arenal Observatory Lodge and also the Museum of Vulcanicity, as well as a ranger station. The park lies within the 2,040 square kilometres (790 sq mi) Arenal Tilaran Conservation Area, protecting eight of Costa Rica's 12 life zones and 16 protected reserves in the region between the Guanacaste and Tilarán mountain ranges, and including Lake Arenal. The park is most directly accessed from La Fortuna, but is also easily accessed via Tilarán and the north shore
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) is a U.S. National Recreation Area administered by the National Park Service that surrounds the San Francisco Bay area. It is one of the most visited units of the National Park system in the United States, with over 13 million visitors a year. It is also one of the largest urban parks in the world, with a size two-and-a-half times that of the consolidated city and county of San Francisco. The park is not one continuous locale, but rather a collection of areas that stretch from northern San Mateo County to southern Marin County, and includes several areas of San Francisco. The park is as diverse as it is expansive; it contains famous tourist attractions such as Muir Woods National Monument, Alcatraz, and the Presidio of San Francisco. The GGNRA is also home to 1,273 plant and animal species, encompasses 59 miles (95 km) of bay and ocean shoreline and has military fortifications that span centuries of California history, from the Spanish conquistadors to Cold War-era Nike missile sites. The park was created thanks to the coopertive legislative efforts of cosponsers Congressman William S. Mailliard (R-San Francisco) and Congressman
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Key Cave National Wildlife Refuge

    Key Cave National Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    Key Cave National Wildlife Refuge is a 1,060 acre (4.3 km) National Wildlife Refuge located in northwestern Alabama, along the Tennessee River downstream from Florence, Alabama. Additional purchases are under negotiation which will increase the size of the refuge to 1,800 acres (7.3 km). More than 6,000 visitors per year visit the refuge. The facility is unstaffed, but is administered by the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in Decatur, Alabama. Two caves, Key Cave and Collier Cave, lie within the refuge, approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) apart. Both caves are closed to the public. Each is on the northern shore of Pickwick Lake on the Tennessee River. The area also contains several sinkholes and underground cave systems, including a 38-acre (150,000 m) sinkhole lake. The sinkholes and cave systems provide a source of groundwater for the caves. The refuge is set up to minimize the pollution of this groundwater. The land suffers from severe erosion due to the extensive farming in the area. A restoration of the land to native warm season grasses and mixed hardwoods is underway in order to protect the cave groundwater area. Approximately 338 acres (1.4 km) of the land is used for corn
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Oulanka National Park

    Oulanka National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Oulanka National Park (Finnish: Oulangan kansallispuisto) is a national park in the Northern Ostrobothnia and Lapland regions of Finland, covering 270 square kilometres (104 sq mi). It was established in 1956 and was expanded again in 1982 and 1989, and it borders with Paanajärvi National Park in Russia. The first inhabitants in the area were Sami people from Lapland who lived here until the end of the 17th century, which was when they had to give way to Finnish settlers. Although hunting, fishing and later farming was the primary occupation of the people who lived there, today the most notable activity in Oulanka is tourism. From the 1930s, the Finnish Tourist Association kept boats on the river and renovated the wooden cabins found across the park for accommodation purposes. These cabins can be used free of charge by any hikers in the area, given that they follow some basic guidelines and rules regarding the state of the cabins, the wood supply, and protecting the surrounding nature. From 2002, Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks which became part of World Wide Fund for Nature's PAN Parks, the other one being the Southwestern Archipelago National Park. Oulanka
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Peace Arch Provincial Park

    Peace Arch Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Peace Arch Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. It is part of the cross-border Peace Arch Park. The Peace Arch, dedicated in 1921, was the first such structure in the world. It was built on the International Boundary between Canada and the United States to commemorate the lasting peace between the two countries. The Canadian side was established as a provincial park on November 7, 1939. The following recreational activities are available: walking, indoor and outdoor picnicking and a playground for children. It is located in Surrey, British Columbia, 40 kilometres south of Vancouver, on the shore of the Strait of Georgia, in Semiahmoo Bay. It is situated on the International Boundary at the Douglas border crossing. This is at the junction of Highway 99 in British Columbia and Interstate 5 in Washington State. The park is nine hectares in size.
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Repovesi National Park

    Repovesi National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Repovesi National Park (Finnish: Repoveden kansallispuisto) is situated in the municipalities of Kouvola and Mäntyharju, only a few hours north-east of the more populous Helsinki area of southern Finland. Formerly a site for intensive commercial forestry, the Repovesi area successfully transformed into a pristine national park. Pine and birch trees dominate the park. Repovesi abounds with wildlife including bear, deer and various birds. The River Koukunjoki cuts through the park. Other streams and lakes are also situated within the parks boundaries. Attractions include the Olhavanvuori hill, popular among climbers, and the Kultareitti water taxi route. Also located in the park are the Kuutinlahti bay with its restored timber rafting channels, the Lapinsalmi suspension bridge, and many observation towers. The common fauna of the park includes the Red-throated Diver, the Eurasian Lynx, the moose, many owls and several galliformes. Media related to Repovesi National Park at Wikimedia Commons
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Gulf Islands National Park Reserve

    Gulf Islands National Park Reserve

    • System: Canadian National Parks
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Parks Canada
    Gulf Islands National Park Reserve is the 40th National Park in a system of 43 parks and park reserves across Canada. Located in British Columbia's Gulf Islands, it covers 33 square kilometers over 16 islands. It also includes numerous islets and reef areas. Camping:Gulf Islands National Park Reserve offers 5 kayak-in (or boat-in), backcountry campsites on Cabbage Island. There is no potable water available on Cabbage Island and no campfires are allowed, regardless of season. Camping:Gulf Islands National Park Reserve offers 7 kayak-in (or boat-in) backcountry campsites on D'Arcy Island. There is no potable water available on D'Arcy, and no campfires are permitted, regardless of season. Camping:Gulf Islands National Park Reserve offers 3 kayak-in (or boat-in) backcountry campsites on Isle-de-Lis(Rum Island). There is no potable water available, and there are no campfires allowed, regardless of season. Neighboring Gooch Island is private property; do not trespass. Hiking: There is an easy 1.5km loop trail at Bennett Bay that leads to Campbell Point. Campbell Point features remnant old-growth forest and views of Georgeson Island. Bennett Bay has a sandy beach which is suitable for
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Alpine Lakes Wilderness

    Alpine Lakes Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Alpine Lakes Wilderness is a large wilderness area spanning the Cascade Range of Washington state in the United States. The wilderness is located in parts of Wenatchee National Forest and Snoqualmie National Forest, and is approximately bounded by Interstate 90 and Snoqualmie Pass to the south and U.S. Route 2 and Stevens Pass to the north. The Alpine Lakes is the largest wilderness area near the population centers of Puget Sound, at approximately 390,000 acres (1,600 km) The wilderness was originally designated the Alpine Lakes Limited Area in 1946, but this designation did not offer protection from resource extractions and was exclusively regulated by the United States Forest Service. The region and adjacent areas were being extensively used for mining, timber extraction, and fur trapping leading to roads, clear cuts and ecological degradation. Efforts to further protect the lower valley forests of Alpine Lakes began in the 1950s by the North Cascades Conservation Council formed in 1957 and in October 1968 the Alpine Lakes Protection Society was formed. However, it was the plans of the Snoqualmie National Forest to expand timber sales and build a road up the Miller River
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Clearwater National Forest

    Clearwater National Forest

    • System: United States National Forest
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Clearwater National Forest is located in North Central Idaho in the northwestern United States. The forest is bounded on the east by the state of Montana, on the north by the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, and on the south and west by the Nez Perce National Forest and Palouse Prairie. The forest is 1.8 million acres (7,300 km²) and contains mountains and river drainage areas. The Lochsa and Clearwater Rivers flow through the forest region. Portions of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness are also located in the forest. In descending order of land area the forest is located in Idaho, Clearwater, and Shoshone counties. Forest Service headquarters are located in Orofino, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices in Kamiah, Kooskia, Lolo (Montana), Orofino, and Potlatch (all in Idaho, except as indicated). The Clearwater National Forest is home to the well-known Jerry Johnson Hot Springs and the smaller Weir Creek Hot Springs. Both springs are accessible via trails from U.S. Highway 12 and are popular tourist attractions, drawing visitors from Idaho and western Montana. Lewis and Clark travelled through the region in their journey westward in 1805-1806. Upon reaching Lolo Pass at
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Frontenac Provincial Park

    Frontenac Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Frontenac Provincial Park is located near the town of Sydenham, north of the city of Kingston, Ontario, Canada. The Government of Ontario has classified Frontenac Provincial Park as a natural environment park. The park lies on the Frontenac Axis, a topographic extension of the Canadian Shield, which connects to the Adirondack Mountains, and consists of mixed forest, lakes, wetlands, and granite outcrops. Recreational opportunities include hiking, canoeing, and backcountry camping. Wilderness courses are offered to teach wilderness skills in a semi-wilderness setting. Historically, the park provided important resources for local communities through the logging and mining industries. Frontenac Provincial Park is home to a native population of grey wolves. Other animals that call the park home are American black bear, red fox, mink, northern river otter, white-tailed deer, porcupine, and fisher. Frontenac contains many hiking trails totaling at over 160 kilometres in length. Here is a list of the main trails of the park. Arab Lake Gorge Trail is a short, 1.5 kilometre trail that traverses the Arab Lake Gorge. Doe Lake Trail is three kilometres in length. It goes from South Otter Lake
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Iguazú National Park

    Iguazú National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Iguazú National Park is a national park of Argentina, located in the Iguazú Department, in the north of the province of Misiones, Argentine Mesopotamia. It has an area of 550 km (212 sq mi). The park was created in 1934 and it contains one of the greatest natural beauties of Argentina, the Iguazu Falls, surrounded by the subtropical jungle. Across the Iguazu River lies its Brazilian counterpart (Iguaçu National Park). Both sites were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO, in 1984. The area of the park was inhabited 10,000 years ago by the hunter-gatherers of the Eldoradense culture. They were displaced around 1,000 CE by the Guaraní, who brought new agricultural technologies, and were displaced in turn by the Spanish and Portuguese conquistadores in the 16th century, though their legacy is still alive in this area (the name of the park and the river is Guaraní y guasu, "large water"). The first European to visit the zone was Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, in 1542; Jesuit missions followed in 1609. The park lies within the Alto Paraná Atlantic forests ecoregion. The fauna of the park includes several endangered species: jaguar, jaguarundi, South American Tapir, Ocelot, tirica,
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Red Rock Lakes Wilderness

    Red Rock Lakes Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    The Red Rock Lakes Wilderness is within the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Montana, United States. The wilderness occupies more than three fourths of the refuge and was set aside to enhance species preservation, especially for such waterfowl as the trumpeter swan. By the mid 1930s, there were an estimated 69 trumpeter swans remaining in the lower 48 states and more than half of them were found in the region that is now the wilderness. The creation of the Wildlife Refuge marks one of the earliest attempts to ensure protection for a fast disappearing species and the wilderness designation enhances this habitat's protection status. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with proper permit, no roads or buildings are constructed and there is also no logging or mining, in compliance with the 1964 Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas within National Forests and Bureau of Land Management areas also typically allow hunting in season. However, due to the sensitivity and continued endangerment of the trumpeter Swan, no hunting is permitted within this wilderness. Consisting of numerous
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Skaftafell National Park

    Skaftafell National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Skaftafell National Park was a national park, situated between Kirkjubæjarklaustur, typically referred to as Klaustur, and Höfn in the south of Iceland. On 7 June 2008, it became a part of the larger Vatnajökull National Park. It was founded on September 15, 1967, and enlarged twice afterwards. Today, the park measures about 4807 km (2884 mi²), making it Iceland's second largest national park. It is home to the valley Morsárdalur, the mountain Kristínartindar and the glacier Skaftafellsjökull (a spur of the Vatnajökull ice cap). The landscape is very similar to some of the Alps, but it has been formed in thousands of years by different influences of fire (volcanic eruptions of Öræfajökull) and water (the glaciers Skeiðarájökull and Skaftafellsjökull), the rivers Skeiðará, Morsá und Skaftafellsá. Volcanic eruptions under the ice-cap can give rise to jökulhlaups (glacial floods) which swell the Skeiðará river massively. The sandy wasteland between the glacier and the sea caused by jökulhlaups is called the Sandur. The last jökulhlaup occurred in 1996. Skaftafell is renowned in Iceland for its agreeable climate and the sunny days in summer, uncommon in the south of Iceland. There is a
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Staple Bend Tunnel

    Staple Bend Tunnel

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Staple Bend Tunnel, about 4 miles (6.4 km) east of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in a town called Mineral Point, was constructed between 1831 and 1834 for the Allegheny Portage Railroad. Construction began on April 12, 1831. This tunnel, at 901 feet (275 m) in length, was the first railway tunnel constructed in the United States. It is rock bored and stone lined. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. It is now part of the Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, administered by the National Park Service.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Susquehannock State Park

    Susquehannock State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Susquehannock State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 224 acres (91 ha) in Drumore Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is on a scenic plateau overlooking the Susquehanna River and Conowingo Reservoir. The park is named for the Susquehannock people, who lived in the area. Susquehannock State Park is located on small roads a few miles south of Pennsylvania Route 372 or west of Pennsylvania Route 272. The nearest city is Lancaster, about 15 miles (24 km) north. In addition to its many fine views of the river and Wissler Run, the park is used for picnics, hiking, horseback riding, and has organized group tenting facilities for overnight use by qualified groups. There are 5 miles (8.0 km) of hiking trails at Susquehannock State Park. The trails wind through a variety of habitats. Native holly, rhododendron and a wide variety of wildflowers can be seen at the park. Woodland creatures like the White-tailed deer, songbirds and some lizards can be seen. Osprey, vultures, hawks and Bald Eagles can be seen soaring over the river and park from the scenic overlooks. All trails, except Rhododendron Trail, are open to horseback riding. Susquehannock State
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Swatara State Park

    Swatara State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Swatara State Park is a 3,515-acre (1,422 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Bethel, Swatara and Union Townships, Lebanon and Pine Grove Township, Schuylkill Counties in Pennsylvania in the United States. 8 miles (13 km) of Swatara Creek lie within the park's boundaries, which are roughly formed by Pennsylvania Route 443 to the north and Interstate 81 to the south. The park is in a valley in the ridge and valley region of Pennsylvania between Second Mountain (north) and Blue Mountain (south). Swatara State Park is a fairly new park for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It was opened in 1987 and is still largely undeveloped. The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is working on plans to further develop the lands of Swatara State Park. The original plans called for the building of a dam and reservoir for recreational fishing and boating as well as to provide drinking water for the City of Lebanon. The PADCNR explored plans for developing the park without the recreational lake/reservoir, and in 2012 started developing the park with infrastructure improvements to increase access to the biking, hiking, canoeing, fishing and picnicking opportunities in the park.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Fort Donelson National Battlefield

    Fort Donelson National Battlefield

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Fort Donelson National Battlefield preserves Fort Donelson and Fort Heiman, two sites of the American Civil War Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign, in which Union Army Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant and Flag Officer Andrew Hull Foote captured three Confederate forts and opened two rivers, the Tennessee River and the Cumberland River, to control by the Union Navy. The commanders received national recognition for their victories in February 1862, as they were the first major Union successes of the war. The capture of Fort Donelson and its garrison by the Union led to the capture of Tennessee's capital and industrial center, Nashville, which remained in Union hands from February 25, 1862 until the end of the war, and gave the Union effective control over much of Tennessee. This stuck a major blow to the Confederacy early in the war. The main portion of the park, in Dover, Tennessee, commemorates the Battle of Fort Donelson (36°29′41″N 87°51′22″W / 36.49472°N 87.85611°W / 36.49472; -87.85611). Fort Heiman, in nearby Calloway County, Kentucky, was a Confederate battery in the Battle of Fort Henry. The most vulnerable area in the Confederate defensive line in the Western Theater
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Hells Canyon Wilderness

    Hells Canyon Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Hells Canyon Wilderness is a wilderness area located in the U.S. states of Idaho and Oregon. Created in 1975, the Wilderness is managed by both the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service and contains some of the most spectacular sections of the Snake River as it winds its way through Hells Canyon, North America's deepest river gorge and one of the deepest gorges on Earth. The Oregon Wilderness Act of 1984 added additional acreage and currently the area protects a total area of 217,927 acres (88,192 ha). It lies entirely within the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area except for a small 946-acre (383 ha) plot in southeastern Wallowa County, Oregon which is administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The area that is administered by the Forest Service consists of portions of (in descending order of acreage) the Wallowa, Nez Perce, Payette, and Whitman National Forests. The Oregon portion of Hells Canyon Wilderness is characterized by two steep breakland areas in excess of 60 percent paralleling the Snake River. These are separated by a benchland at mid-elevation between the river and canyon rim between Saddle Creek and Dug Bar. The dominant vegetation is
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Lopé National Park

    Lopé National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Lopé National Park is a national park in central Gabon. Although the terrain is mostly rain forest, in the north the park contains the last remnants of grass savannas created in Central Africa during the last Ice Age, 15,000 years ago. It was the first protected area in Gabon when the Lopé-Okanda Wildlife Reserve was created in 1946. In 2007, the Lopé-Okanda landscape was added to the World Heritage List by UNESCO. The park contains a small research station, named as Mikongo and run by the Zoological Society London, based in the village known as Mikongo, from which it gets its name. There exists infrastructure to cater for tourists at the base, including several chalets and a large open air dining room, from which the rainforest is a mere five meters away.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Minute Man National Historical Park

    Minute Man National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Not to be confused with Minuteman Missile National Historic Site. Minute Man National Historical Park commemorates the opening battle in the American Revolutionary War. It also includes The Wayside, home in turn to three noted American authors. The National Historical Park is under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service and protects 970 acres (3.9 km) in and around the towns of Lexington, Massachusetts, Lincoln, Massachusetts, and Concord, Massachusetts. These sites include: Park visitor centers are located at the hill overlooking the North Bridge and along Battle Road. The main visitor center, on Route 2A/Battle Road, features an exciting 25-minute multi-media show, "Road to Revolution" that gives a good introduction to the Lexington-Concord events.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Sundarbans National Park

    Sundarbans National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: Strict nature reserve
    • Governing Body:
    The Sundarbans National Park সুন্দরবন জাতীয় উদ্যান is a National Park, Tiger Reserve, and a Biosphere Reserve located in the Sundarbans delta in the Bangladeshn গণপ্রজাতন্ত্রী বাংলাদেশ Division of Barisall. This region is densely covered by mangrove forests, and is one of the largest reserves for the Bengal tiger. It is also home to a variety of bird, reptile and invertebrate species, including the salt-water crocodile. The present Sundarbans National Park was declared as the core area of Sundarbans Tiger Reserve in 1973 and a wildlife sanctuary in 1977. On May 4, 1984 it was declared a National Park. The Directorate of Forest is responsible for the administration and management of Sundarbans. The principal Chief Conservator of Forests, Wildlife & Bio-Diversity & ex-officio Chief Wildlife Warden, West Bengal is the senior most executive officer looking over the administration of the park. The Chief Conservator of Forests (South) & Director, Sundarban Biosphere Reserve is the administrative head of the park at the local level and is assisted by a Deputy Field Director and an Assistant Field Director. The park area is divided into two ranges, overseen by range forest officers. Each
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Valkmusa National Park

    Valkmusa National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Valkmusa National Park (Finnish: Valkmusan kansallispuisto, Swedish: Valkmusa nationalpark) is a national park in the Kymenlaakso region of Finland. It was established in 1996 and covers 17 square kilometres (6.6 sq mi). The national park comprises swamp land, extraordinarily representing in southern Finland. More than 30 different swamp types can be categorised in the area. The park has a diverse birdlife. Characteristic of the species is abundant southern avifauna, and on the other hand the occurrence of northern species, such as the Willow Grouse and Rustic Bunting. The park is an important resting place for migratory birds. There is a very representing butterfly species in the area, which comprises many endangered species. The symbol species of the park is Idaea muricata.
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Blue Ridge Parkway

    Blue Ridge Parkway

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Parkway and All-American Road in the United States, noted for its scenic beauty. It runs for 469 miles (755 km), mostly along the Blue Ridge, a major mountain chain that is part of the Appalachian Mountains. Its southern terminus is on the boundary between Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina, from which it travels north to Shenandoah National Park in Virginia and offers access to the Skyline Drive. The two All-American Byways are separate and distinct. The Blue Ridge Parkway was built to connect Shenandoah National Park to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Parkway, while not a "National Park", is the most visited unit of the National Park System. Land on either side of the road is owned and maintained by the National Park Service and, in many places, parkway land is bordered by United States Forest Service property. The Parkway will be depicted on North Carolina's version of the America the Beautiful quarter in 2015. Begun during the administration of U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt, the project was originally called the Appalachian Scenic Highway. Most construction was
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Chugach National Forest

    Chugach National Forest

    • System: United States National Forest
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Chugach National Forest is a 5.4 million acre (23,000 km²) United States National Forest in south central Alaska. It is located in the mountains surrounding Prince William Sound including the eastern Kenai Peninsula and the delta of the Copper River. It is the second-largest (third-largest if the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest is considered as one entity) forest in the U.S. national forest system, and is the northernmost national forest. The Chugach National Forest envelops Prince William Sound and is surrounded by the Chugach Mountains. It was originally designated in 1907 by Theodore Roosevelt and was originally 23 million acres (93 000 km²) in size. Approximately one-third of the area of the forest is rocks and ice. The supervisor's office is located in Anchorage. There are local ranger district offices located in Cordova, Girdwood, and Seward. Though the Chugach forest is largely wild, with only 90 miles (140 km) of Forest Service roads, none of it is currently designated as wilderness. In descending order of land area within the forest it is located in parts of the Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Kenai Peninsula Borough, Anchorage Municipality, Matanuska-Susitna Borough,
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park

    Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Recreation Area is a Florida State Park located on a barrier island on Florida's southwest coast near Naples, Florida, six miles west of Exit 111 on I-75. The Cocohatchee River and the Gulf of Mexico are accessible from the park, which contains a hard bottom reef. Among the wildlife of the park are bald eagles, ospreys, owls, loggerhead sea turtles, West Indian manatees and migratory shorebirds. The Endangered Gopher Tortoise can also be found there. It is the only Tortoise found East of the Mississippi River. Activities include fishing, sunbathing, swimming, beachcombing, boating and nature viewing. Visitors can also scuba dive, snorkel, kayak, and picnic. Amenities include beaches, boat ramp and docks, picnic areas and a pavilion that can hold 100, and boardwalks that lead to the picnic areas. Florida state parks are open between 8 a.m. and sundown every day of the year (including holidays). Media related to Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Ironwood Forest National Monument

    Ironwood Forest National Monument

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: United States Bureau of Land Management
    Ironwood Forest National Monument is located in the Sonoran Desert and the U.S. state of Arizona. Created by Bill Clinton by Presidential Proclamation 7320 on June 9, 2000, the 129,022 acre (522 km) monument is managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior. Although the National Monument status applies only to federal lands, the monument perimeter surrounds about 189,000 acres (765 km) contiguous of federal and private land holdings, including Arizona State School Trust lands. A significant concentration of Ironwood (also known as Desert Ironwood, Olneya tesota) trees is found in the monument, along with two federally recognized endangered animal and plant species. More than 200 Hohokam and Paleoindian archaeological sites have been identified in the monument, dated between 600 and 1450. An array of flora are present in the Ironwood Forest National Monument. The higher elevations have the Pinyon-juniper woodland plant community. The lower elevations are in the Sonoran Desert ecoregion. One of the notable trees native here is the Elephant tree, Bursera microphylla. Small populations of the endangered Nichols Turk's Head Cactus,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Tuktut Nogait National Park

    Tuktut Nogait National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Parks Canada
    Tuktut Nogait National Park (sometimes spelled Tuktuk Nogait) is a national park located in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Meaning "young caribou" in Inuvialuktun, the park contains many herds of caribou. However, it is also the home to other wildlife species, such as Muskox, Grizzly Bears, Arctic char, and the Grey Wolf. Tuktut Nogait is also a major breeding and nesting ground for a wide variety of migratory birds. Raptors such as Peregrine Falcons, Rough-legged Hawks, Gyr Falcons and Golden Eagles nest along the steep walls of river canyons. The main rivers that run through the park include the Hornaday River and Roscoe River. The park encompasses 16,340 square kilometres and is located 170 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle in the northeast corner of mainland Northwest Territories. Humans have occupied Tuktut Nogait since AD 1000 and recent surveys have identified over 360 archaeological sites in the park. The oldest known archaeological sites are most likely Thule or Copper Inuit ranging from AD 1200 to 1500. Father Émile Petitot was the first European to reach the area in 1867-68. In 1930, the Hudson's Bay Company established an outpost at Letty Harbour but the post
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Mercantour National Park

    Mercantour National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Mercantour National Park (French: Parc national du Mercantour) is one of the nine national parks of France. Since it was created in 1979, the Mercantour Park has proven popular, with 800,000 visitors every year enjoying the 600 km of marked footpaths and visiting its villages. The protected area covers some 685 km², consisting of a central uninhabited zone comprising seven valleys - Roya, Bévéra, Vésubie, Tinée, Haut Var/Cians (in the Alpes-Maritimes) plus Verdon and Ubaye (in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) - and a peripheral zone comprising 28 villages. Many of them are perched villages,such as Belvédère at the entrance to the spectacular Gordolasque valley, concealing great architectural riches (numerous churches decorated with murals and altar pieces by primitive Niçois painters). More than 150 rural sites are located within the Park. Around Mont Bégo there are petroglyphs pecked out on schist and granite faces. They have been dated from the late Neolithic and Bronze Ages. In the heart of this setting of vertiginous summits (including Mont Gélas, the highest point in the Maritime Alps at 3,143 m), lies a gem listed as a Historical Monument, the famous Vallée des Merveilles, the
    5.00
    5 votes
    119
    Andohahela National Park

    Andohahela National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Madagascar National Parks
    Andohahela National Park, in southeast Madagascar, is remarkable for the extremes of habitats that are representened within it. The park covers 760 square kilometers of the Anosy mountain range, the southernmost spur of the Malagasy Highlands. These mountains form a natural barrier to the moist trade winds that blow from the east, causing a rainfall of 1500 to 2000mm per year on their eastern side that supports one of the few rainforests south of the tropic of Capricorn. At the western edge of the park, the rainfall is just 600 to 700mm per year and the resulting vegetation is a dry spiny forest characteristic of southern Madagascar. In the area between these two climatic extremes is a unique transitional forest known as the Ranopiso transition, which is characterised by the locally endemic triangular palm, Dypsis decaryi. The variety of habitats within Andohahela is mirrored in the richness of species that are found there. Fifteen species of lemur have been recorded, including two of Madagascar's most emblematic species, the Ring-tailed Lemur and Verreaux's Sifaka. Several circuits within each of the habitat types of the park can be accessed by road from the town of Tolagnaro.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Box-Death Hollow Wilderness

    Box-Death Hollow Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Box-Death Hollow Wilderness is a 25,751 acres (104 km) wilderness area located in south-central Utah, USA, on the Dixie National Forest. Vertical gray-orange walls of Navajo sandstone stand above two canyon tributaries of the Escalante River in Box-Death Hollow. The name Death Hollow gives reference to a number of livestock that plunged to their death trying to cross the steep canyon. Running north-south through a steeply dipping monocline, Pine Creek forms the box canyon (a canyon accessible only at the lower end) known appropriately as "The Box." Death Hollow Creek, east of The Box, has carved its way through a gently dipping monocline. Raging waters often flood these canyon narrows after a rain. Pinyon and juniper cover many of the plateaus above the canyons. Brown and rainbow trout are plentiful in Pine Creek and in portions of Sand Creek. Along the creek banks, you may see mule deer, an occasional cougar, or even elk in winter. Three bird species listed by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources as "sensitive" can be found in the Wilderness - Lewis's Woodpecker, the western bluebird, and the mountain bluebird. Nine miles of trail run the distance of "the Box", while hiking in
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Eden Gardens State Park

    Eden Gardens State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Eden Gardens State Park is a 163 acres (0.66 km) Florida State Park and historic site located in Point Washington, south of Freeport, off U.S. 98 on CR 395, in northwestern Florida. The park is centered around the Wesley house, a two story mansion virtually surrounded by white columns and verandas. The house is notable for its furnishings, especially examples of late 18th century French furniture. The site has various gardens, numerous large, old southern live oak trees, and frontage on Tucker Bayou. The park has such amenities as a historic 1897 house filled with antiques where tours are given from 10:00am through 3:00pm on the hour every hour Thursday through Monday, (the house is closed on Tue. and Wed. for maintenance). There are beautiful ornamental gardens with heritage roses, camellias, azaleas, as well as a butterfly garden and a reflection pond filled with water lilies and large koi. For those that like the more natural look, there are nature trails as well as picnic areas and a fishing dock.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Historic Mill Creek State Park

    Historic Mill Creek State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Historic Mill Creek State Park is a state park, nature preserve, and historic site in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is run by Mackinac State Historic Parks, the operating arm of the Mackinac Island State Park. 625 acres (2.5 km²) in size, the park is located 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Mackinaw City, Michigan on U.S. Highway 23. The original sawmill at Mill Creek operated from about 1790 until 1839. It was originally built to supply lumber to the Straits of Mackinac, especially the frontier settlement of Mackinac Island. In 1793 it contracted with Fort Mackinac to make repairs on the soldiers' barracks. The Mill Creek sawmill enjoyed a dominant market share of the supply of cut timbers in the Straits of Mackinac during the fur trade era, and a Millwright's House was built about 1820 near the sawmill to provide a place for the mill operator to live. As global demand for beaver fur declined in the 1830s, the sawmill and Millwright's House were abandoned, following the death of mill owner Michael Dousman. After the sawmill's abandonment in 1839, the original sawmill complex buildings rotted and disappeared. However, timbers cut by the original mill survived in buildings on Mackinac
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Little Buffalo State Park

    Little Buffalo State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Little Buffalo State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 923 acres (3.7 km) in Centre and Juniata Townships, Perry County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is a historical destination as well as a recreational destination. Visitors to the park can cross a covered bridge and observe a restored and operating grist mill. The park is also home to Holman Lake a popular fishing lake in Perry County and several hundred acres are open to hunting. Little Buffalo State Park is a mile southwest of Newport just off Pennsylvania Route 34. Little Buffalo State Park is named for Little Buffalo Creek which runs through the park. The creek and the nearby Buffalo Ridge are named for the bison that are believed to have once roamed the ridge and valley region of Pennsylvania. Humans have lived in what is now Pennsylvania since at least 10,000 BC. The first settlers were Paleo-Indian nomadic hunters known from their stone tools. The hunter-gatherers of the Archaic period, which lasted locally from 7000 to 1000 BC, used a greater variety of more sophisticated stone artefacts. The Woodland period marked the gradual transition to semi-permanent villages and horticulture, between 1000 BC and
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Ouachita National Forest

    Ouachita National Forest

    • System: United States National Forest
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Ouachita National Forest is a National Forest that lies in the western portion of Arkansas and portions of eastern Oklahoma. The Ouachita National Forest is the oldest National Forest in the southern United States. The forest encompasses 1,784,457 acres (7,221 km), including most of the scenic Ouachita Mountains. Six locations in the forest, comprising 65,000 acres (263 km), have been designated as wilderness areas. Ouachita is the French spelling of the Indian word Washita which means "good hunting grounds". The forest was known as Arkansas National Forest on its establishment on December 18, 1907; the name was changed to Ouachita National Forest on April 29, 1926. Rich in history, the rugged and scenic Ouachita Mountains were first explored in 1541 by Hernando de Soto's party of Spaniards. French explorers followed, flavoring the region with names like Fourche La Fave River. The area including the forest nearly became a 165,000-acre (670 km) national park during the 1920s but a last-minute pocket veto by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge ended the effort. The bill had been pushed by U.S. Senator Joseph T. Robinson and U.S. Representative Otis Wingo, both Democrats, and State
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Table Mountain National Park

    Table Mountain National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Table Mountain National Park, previously known as the Cape Peninsula National Park, is a national park in Cape Town, South Africa, proclaimed on 29 May 1998, for the purpose of protecting the natural environment of the Table Mountain Chain, and in particular the rare fynbos vegetation. The park is managed by South African National Parks. The park contains two well-known landmarks: Table Mountain, for which the park is named; and the Cape of Good Hope, the most southwestern extremity of Africa. The park runs approximately north-south along the range of mountains that make up the mountainous spine of the Cape Peninsula, from Signal Hill in the north, through Lion's Head, Table Mountain, Constantiaberg, Silvermine, the mountains of the southern Peninsula, terminating at Cape Point. The park is not a single contiguous area; the undeveloped mountainous areas which make up most of the park are separated by developed urban areas on shallower terrain. Thus the park is divided into three separate sections, as listed below. This section covers Signal Hill, Lion's Head, Table Mountain proper, including the Back Table (the rear, lower part of the mountain), Devil's Peak, the Twelve Apostles
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Urca de Lima

    Urca de Lima

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    The Urca de Lima is a Spanish shipwreck (which sank in 1715) near Fort Pierce, Florida, United States. It was part of the 1715 Treasure Fleet itself one of the numerous Spanish treasure fleets. It is located north of Fort Pierce Inlet, 200 yards off the shore from Jack Island Park. It became the first Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserve when it was dedicated in 1987. This was followed on May 31, 2001 with its addition to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Weminuche Wilderness

    Weminuche Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Weminuche Wilderness is a wilderness area in southwest Colorado managed by the United States Forest Service as part of the San Juan National Forest on the west side of the Continental Divide and the Rio Grande National Forest on the east side of the divide. It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) south east of the town of Silverton and about 15 miles (0.024 km) northeast of Durango. At 488,210 acres (1,975.7 km), it is the largest wilderness area in the state of Colorado. Within the wilderness can be found three fourteeners of the San Juan Mountains; Mount Eolus, Sunlight Peak and Windom Peak, in addition to numerous thirteeners and other peaks of note.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Oregon Trail

    Oregon Trail

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Oregon Trail is a 2,000-mile (3,200 km) historic east-west wagon route and emigrant trail that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon and locations in between. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of the future state of Kansas and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming. The western half of the trail spanned most of the future states of Idaho and Oregon. The beginnings of the Oregon Trail were laid by fur trappers and traders from about 1811 to 1840 and were only passable on foot or by horseback. By 1836, when the first migrant wagon train was organized in Independence, Missouri, a wagon trail had been cleared to Fort Hall, Idaho. Wagon trails were cleared further and further west, eventually reaching all the way to the Willamette Valley in Oregon. What became called the Oregon Trail was complete even as improved roads, "cutouts", ferries and bridges made the trip faster and safer almost every year. From various "jumping off points" in Missouri, Iowa or Nebraska Territory, the routes converged along the lower Platte River Valley near Fort Kearny, Nebraska Territory and led to rich farmlands west of the Rocky Mountains. From the
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Pico da Neblina National Park

    Pico da Neblina National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Pico da Neblina National Park is a national park in the north of Brazil, bordering on Venezuela. The latter country also has an adjoining national park, called Neblina as well. The Brazilian national park was created in 1979, and it is one of the country's largest national parks, with 22,200 km (8,600 sq mi). The park was named after Pico da Neblina, one of its mountains and the country's highest elevation at 2,994 m (9,823 ft). It is covered by dense or open Amazon Rainforest, although other forms of vegetation, associated to high altitudes, can be also found in the area. The wildlife is very diverse, with some peculiar species, like the Neblina Uakari and the Guianan Cock-of-the-rock. Pico da Neblina National Park is located in one of the wettest areas of the Amazon, with an annual precipitation of 4,000 mm (160 in). The park is also part of the Yanomami territory and requires a special permit to be visited. There is no tourist infrastructure whatsoever and access is very difficult.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

    Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is a U.S. National Lakeshore on the shore of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, United States. It extends for 42 miles (67 km) along the shore and covers 73,236 acres (114 sq mi; 296 km). The park offers spectacular scenery of the hilly shoreline between Munising, Michigan and Grand Marais, Michigan, with various rock formations like natural archways, waterfalls, and sand dunes. Pictured Rocks derives its name from the 15 miles (24 km) of colorful sandstone cliffs northeast of Munising. The cliffs are up to 200 feet (60 m) above lake level. They have been naturally sculptured into shallow caves, arches, formations that resemble castle turrets, and human profiles, among others. Near Munising visitors also can view Grand Island, most of which is included in the Grand Island National Recreation Area and is preserved separately. The U.S. Congress made Pictured Rocks the first officially-designated National Lakeshore in the United States in 1966. It is governed by the National Park Service (NPS), had 22 year-round NPS employees as of May 2006, and received 476,888 visitors in 2005. The colors in the cliffs are created by the large amounts
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Theodore Roosevelt Island

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Theodore Roosevelt Island is a 88.5-acre (358,000 m) island and a national memorial located in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. The island was given to the American people by the Theodore Roosevelt Association in memory of the 26th U.S. president, Theodore Roosevelt; before that, the island had been known as My Lord's Island, Barbadoes Island, Mason's Island, Analostan Island, and Anacostine Island. The island is maintained by the National Park Service as part of the nearby George Washington Memorial Parkway. The land is generally maintained as a natural park, with various trails and a memorial plaza featuring a statue of Roosevelt. No cars or bicycles are permitted on the island, which is reached by a footbridge from Arlington, Virginia, on the western bank of the Potomac. A small island named "Little Island" lies just off the southern tip; Georgetown and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts are across the main channel of the Potomac to the north and east, respectively. The Nacotchtank Indians, formerly of what is now Anacostia (in Washington, D.C.), temporarily moved to the island in 1668, giving its first recorded name, "Anacostine." The island was patented in
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Cherokee Grove

    Cherokee Grove

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Cherokee Grove (also known as Princess Place) is a historic site in Bunnell, Florida. It is located between A1A and I-95, on Pellicer Creek, just south of the St. Johns/Flagler county line. On May 2, 1997, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Dry Tortugas National Park

    Dry Tortugas National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Dry Tortugas National Park is a national park in the USA about 68 statute miles (109 km) west of Key West in the Gulf of Mexico. The park preserves Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas islands in the Florida Keys. The park is famous for abundant sea life, colorful coral reefs and legends of shipwrecks and sunken treasures. The park's centerpiece is Fort Jefferson, a massive but unfinished coastal fortress. Fort Jefferson is the largest masonry structure in the Western Hemisphere, and is composed of over 16 million bricks. The park has almost 80,000 visitors each year. The park is accessible only by seaplane or boat. Ferries leave from Key West. Activities include snorkeling, picnicking, camping, scuba diving, saltwater fishing and birdwatching. The first European to see the islands was Juan Ponce de León, who visited on June 21, 1513. Ponce de León caught 160 sea turtles there and subsequently referred to the islands as the "Tortugas" (turtles). They are called Dry owing to the absence of surface fresh water on the island. Fort Jefferson is a massive but unfinished coastal fortress. It is the largest masonry structure in the Western Hemisphere, and is composed of over 16 million
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Fort Necessity National Battlefield

    Fort Necessity National Battlefield

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Fort Necessity National Battlefield is a National Battlefield Site in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, United States, which preserves the site of the Battle of Fort Necessity. The battle, which took place on July 3, 1754, was an early battle of the French and Indian War, and resulted in the surrender of British colonial forces under Colonel George Washington, to the French and Indians, under Louis Coulon de Villiers. The site also includes the Mount Washington Tavern, once one of the inns along the National Road, and in two separate units the grave of the British General Edward Braddock, killed in 1755, and the site of the Battle of Jumonville Glen. After returning to the great meadows in what is now Fayette County, Pennsylvania, George Washington decided it prudent to reinforce his position. Supposedly named by Washington as Fort Necessity or Fort of Necessity, the soldiers constructed a storehouse for supplies such as gunpowder, rum, and flour. The crude palisade they erected was built more to defend supplies in the fort's storehouse from Washington's own men, whom he described as "loose and idle", than as a planned defense against a hostile enemy. The sutler of Washington's force
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Kurjenrahka National Park

    Kurjenrahka National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Kurjenrahka National Park (Finnish: Kurjenrahkan kansallispuisto, Swedish: Kurjenrahka nationalpark) is a national park in Finland Proper. It was established in 1998 and covers 29 square kilometres (11 sq mi). The area consists mainly of swamp but also includes primeval forests, some of which have been unmanaged for over 150 years. The Eurasian Lynx is a permanent resident of Kurjenrahka, but brown bears and gray wolves have also been observed and are known to reside in areas within or close to the park. Marked trails in the general area extend to over 200 km. Media related to Kurjenrahka National Park at Wikimedia Commons
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Tupelo National Battlefield

    Tupelo National Battlefield

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Tupelo National Battlefield, in Tupelo, Mississippi, commemorates the July 14–15, 1864, Battle of Tupelo in which Lieutenant General Nathan Bedford Forrest tried to cut the railroad supplying the Union's march on Atlanta. Established as Tupelo National Battlefield Site February 21, 1929; transferred from the War Department August 10, 1933; redesignated and boundary changed August 10, 1961. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. Administered by the Natchez Trace Parkway.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

    Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area was established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, following the construction of the Yellowtail Dam by the Bureau of Reclamation. This dam, named after the famous Crow chairman Robert Yellowtail, harnessed the waters of the Bighorn River and turned this variable stream into a lake. Archeological and historical resources complement the natural scene. About one third of the area is within the Crow Indian Reservation. Bighorn Lake extends 71 miles (114 km) through Wyoming and Montana, 55 miles (89 km) of which are held within spectacular Bighorn Canyon. The Recreation Area straddles the northern Wyoming and southern Montana borders. There are two visitor centers and other developed facilities; one in Fort Smith, Montana, and one near Lovell, Wyoming. The Afterbay Lake below the Yellowtail Dam is a good spot for trout fishing and wildlife viewing for ducks, geese, and other animals. The Bighorn River below the Afterbay Dam is a world class trout fishing area. North of Lovell, there is a spot where one can stand on the canyon rim, shout, and hear a "triple echo."
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Codorus State Park

    Codorus State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Codorus State Park is a 3,329-acre (1,347 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Heidelberg, Manheim, Penn, and West Manheim Townships in southwestern York County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park was created around Lake Marburg, an artificial lake covering 1,275 acres (516 ha), and is named for Codorus Creek, which forms the lake. Codorus State Park is located on Pennsylvania Route 216, 3 miles (4.8 km) from the borough of Hanover. The history of Codorus State Park is tied to a co-operative effort between private enterprise and state and local government. The borough of Spring Grove and the P.H. Glatfelter Company worked together to dam Codorus Creek. The purpose of the dam was to provide drinking water for Spring Grove and to meet the industrial needs of the paper plant owned by the P.H. Glatfelter Company in the borough. The construction of this dam was also beneficial to the people of Pennsylvania when a park was created on the shores of the newly made Lake Marburg. Lake Marburg gets its name from the small community of Marburg that was flooded in December 1966, when Codorus Creek was dammed. The dam is 109 feet (33 m) high, 1,690 feet (520 m) wide and 750 feet (230 m)
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum

    John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum is a 1000 acre (0.8 km) National Wildlife Refuge spanning Philadelphia and Delaware counties in Pennsylvania. Located in Tinicum Township, the refuge is adjacent to the Philadelphia International Airport. Established in 1972 as the Tinicum National Environmental Center, it was renamed in 1991 after the late H. John Heinz III who had helped preserve Tinicum Marsh. The refuge serves to protect the largest remaining freshwater tidal marsh in Pennsylvania; approximately 350 acres (0.8 km). When land acquisition is complete, the refuge will consist of 1200 acres (4.9 km) of varied habitats. The history of Tinicum Marsh, the largest remaining freshwater tidal wetland in Pennsylvania, goes back to 1634 and the region's first settlements. Dutch, Swedish and English settlers diked and drained parts of the marsh for grazing. At that time, the vast tidal marshes stretched over 5,700 acres (23 km). Rapid urbanization since World War I has reduced tidal marshes to approximately 200 acres (0.8 km). The remnant of this once vast tidal marsh is protected by the refuge. A diked, non-tidal area of 145 acres (0.6 km), adjacent to the eastern end of
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    John Muir Wilderness

    John Muir Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: Ib: Wilderness Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The John Muir Wilderness is a wilderness area that extends along the crest of the Sierra Nevada of California, USA for 90 miles (140 km), in the Inyo and Sierra National Forests. Established in 1964 by the Wilderness Act and named for naturalist John Muir, it contains 581,000 acres (2,350 km). The wilderness lies along the eastern escarpment of the Sierra from near Mammoth Lakes and Devils Postpile National Monument in the north, to Cottonwood Pass near Mount Whitney in the south. The wilderness area also spans the Sierra crest north of Kings Canyon National Park, and extends on the west side of the park down to the Monarch Wilderness. The wilderness contains some of the most spectacular and highest peaks of the Sierra Nevada, with 57 peaks over 13,000 feet (4,000 m) in elevation. The peaks are typically made of granite from the Sierra Nevada Batholith, and are dramatically shaped by glacial action. The southernmost glacier in the United States, the Palisade Glacier, is contained within the wilderness area. Notable eastside glaciated canyons are drained by Rock, McGee, and Bishop Creeks. The eastern escarpment in the wilderness rises from 6,000 to 8,000 feet (1,800 to 2,400 m) from
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Junquillal Bay Wildlife Refuge

    Junquillal Bay Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body:
    Junquillal Bay Wildlife Refuge, also called the Bahia Junquillal National Wildlife Refuge, is a 4.38 km (1.69 sq mi) wildlife refuge that is part of the Guanacaste Conservation Area and the Area de Conservación Guanacaste World Heritage Site in the northwestern part of Costa Rica. It protects areas of tropical dry forest and coastal mangroves.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve

    Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: Strict nature reserve
    • Governing Body:
    The Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve is a protected area in the Terai of eastern Nepal covering 175 km (68 sq mi) of wetlands in the Sunsari, Saptari and Udayapur Districts. In altitude it ranges from 75 to 81 metres (246 to 266 ft) and consists of extensive mudflats, reed beds, and freshwater marshes in the floodplain of the Sapta Kosi River. It was established in 1976 and designated as a Ramsar site in December 1987. It can be accessed from the Mahendra Highway. A study of the reserve was conducted between 1997 to 1998 by the Central Department of Zoology, Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu. The study found serious conflicts between the reserve wildlife and the local people living adjacent to the reserve. The people suffered crop depredations and animal harassment while the reserve managers had the problems of poaching, cattle grazing, and other illegal activities in the reserve. The study has several recommendations, one of which is the promotion of tourism to the area with the reserve using local tourist guides trained by wildlife experts. The vegetation of the reserve is mainly characterised by mixed deciduous riverine forest, grasslands and marshy vegetation. The coverage of
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Lower Oder Valley National Park

    Lower Oder Valley National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Lower Oder Valley International Park is a shared German-Polish nature reserve. It comprises the western banks of the Oder (Polish: Odra) river within the Uckermark district in the German state of Brandenburg as well as the steep eastern banks in the Gryfino and Police counties of the Polish West Pomeranian Voivodeship further north. The German part of the core area is the Nationalpark Unteres Odertal (Lower Oder Valley National Park). The Polish part of the core area is the Park Krajobrazowy Dolina Dolnej Odry (Lower Odra Valley Landscape Park). The area comprises 165 km (64 sq mi) (Germany 105 km (41 sq mi), Poland 60 km (23 sq mi)); together with adjoining nature reserves in Germany and Poland the total area is 1,172 km (453 sq mi). By decision of the German-Polish Environmental Council in 1992 the German, Polish and Brandenburg environment ministers as well as the voivode of Szczecin created the Lower Oder Valley International Park. The flat western shore of the Oder features several levees, which in order to control the water level and to prevent highfloods are regularly opened in winter and spring. The water flows freely into extensive floodplains covered until April when
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Prompton State Park

    Prompton State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Prompton State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 2,000 acres (809 ha) in Clinton and Dyberry Townships, Wayne County, Pennsylvania in the United States. This park, which was established in 1962, is officially listed by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources as being undeveloped. This means that it is officially a state park but the PA-DCNR is not currently managing the park. However, the lands of the park are open to visitors. Friends of Prompton State Park, a grassroots organization is working to take over management of the park in much the same way that Salt Springs State Park in Susquehanna County is managed by The Friends of Salt Springs Park. Northeast Sports Ltd. of Honesdale sponsors several outdoor sports events that are held at the park. Prompton State Park is 4.2 miles (6.8 km) west of Honesdale on Pennsylvania Route 170. The following state parks are within 30 miles (48 km) of Prompton State Park:
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Srebarna Nature Reserve

    Srebarna Nature Reserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: Strict nature reserve
    • Governing Body:
    The Srebarna Nature Reserve (Природен резерват Сребърна, Priroden rezervat Srebarna) is a nature reserve in northeastern Bulgaria (Southern Dobruja), near the village of the same name, 18 km west of Silistra and 2 km south of the Danube. It comprises Lake Srebarna and its surroundings and is located on the Via Pontica, a bird migration route between Europe and Africa. The reserve embraces 6 km² of protected area and a buffer zone of 5.4 km². The lake's depth varies from 1 to 3 m. There is a museum constructed, where a collection of stuffed species typical for the reserve is arranged. While Lake Srebarna was studied many times in the past by foreign biologists, the first Bulgarian scientist to take an interest in the area was Aleksi Petrov, who visited the reserve in 1911. In 1913, the whole of Southern Dobrudja was incorporated in Romania, but was returned to Bulgaria in 1940, when the area was visited once again by Petrov to examine the colonies of birds that nest there. The area was proclaimed a nature reserve in 1948 and is a Ramsar site since 1975. The reserve was recognized as World Natural Heritage Site under the 1972 Convention for the Protection of the World Cultural and
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Wekiwa Springs State Park

    Wekiwa Springs State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Wekiwa Springs State Park is a 7,000-acre (28 km) Florida State Park in Apopka, Florida. It is located 20 minutes north of Orlando, off Interstate 4 at exit 94, near Altamonte Springs and Longwood. The park also contains the head water of the Wekiva River. It also serves as the headquarters of one the state's five AmeriCorps Florida State Parks chapters. In the 1800s, Central Florida was primarily agricultural; however, with the end of the Civil War, a stout tourist trade started to take advantage of Florida’s temperate winters, long summers and abundant natural beauty, and out of that growth came Wekiwa Springs. In 1941, the Apopka Sportsmen’s Club purchased the property from the Wilson Cypress Company, which had maintained a small turpentine camp in what is now the park, maintaining the area for recreational use. By 1969 the state of Florida expressed interest in the property for use as a state park, and, starting in 1970, visitors from all over the country and all over the world have been enjoying the natural spring, crystal clear water, and the area's abundant wildlife. A major point for the spring's popularity is the year-round 72 °F (22 °C) temperature of the water. The main
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Bewabic State Park

    Bewabic State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Bewabic State Park is a 315-acre (1.27 km) state park located near Crystal Falls, Michigan in Iron County, Michigan on the shore of Fortune Lake. Bewabic State Park is site #9 of the Iron County Heritage Trail System. The park is rich with Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) history as evidenced by the CCC structures still in use. The park is unique in that it is the only state park in Michigan with tennis courts.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains, which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. The border between Tennessee and North Carolina runs northeast to southwest through the centerline of the park. It is the most visited national park in the United States. On its route from Maine to Georgia, the Appalachian Trail also passes through the center of the park. The park was chartered by the United States Congress in 1934 and officially dedicated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1940. It encompasses 522,419 acres (816.28 sq mi; 2,114.15 km), making it one of the largest protected areas in the eastern United States. The main park entrances are located along U.S. Highway 441 (Newfound Gap Road) at the towns of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and Cherokee, North Carolina. It was the first national park whose land and other costs were paid for in part with federal funds; previous parks were funded wholly with state money or private funds. Before the arrival of European settlers, the region was part of the homeland of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Jim Corbett National Park

    Jim Corbett National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Jim Corbett National Park is the oldest national park in India. The park—named for the hunter and conservationist Jim Corbett who played a key role in its establishment—was established in 1936 as Hailey National Park. Situated in Nainital district of Uttarakhand the park acts as a protected area for the endangered Bengal tiger of India, the secure survival of which is the main objective of Project Tiger, an Indian wildlife protection initiative. The park has sub-Himalayan belt geographical and ecological characteristics. An ecotourism destination, it contains 488 different species of plants and a diverse variety of fauna. The increase in tourist activities, among other problems, continues to present a serious challenge to the park's ecological balance. Corbett has been a haunt for tourists and wildlife lovers for a long time. Tourism activity is only allowed in selected areas of Corbett Tiger Reserve so that people get an opportunity to see its splendid landscape and the diverse wildlife. In recent years the number of people coming here has increased dramatically. Presently, every season more than 70,000 visitors come to the park from India and other countries. The Jim Corbett
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Kennesaw Battlefield Park, at 905 Kennesaw Mountain Drive between Marietta and Kennesaw, Georgia, preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign, and also contains Kennesaw Mountain. The name Kennesaw is derived from the Cherokee Indian gah-nee-sah meaning cemetery, or burial ground. The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, fought here between General William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union army and Joseph E. Johnston of the Confederate army, took place between June 18, 1864, and July 2, 1864. Sherman's army consisted of 100,000 men, 254 cannon and 35,000 horses, while Johnston's army had only 50,000 men and 187 cannon. Much of the battle took place not on Kennesaw Mountain itself, but on Little Kennesaw and the area to its south. 5,350 soldiers were killed during the battle. The battle resulted in a Confederate victory. Established as Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Site on February 8, 1917, it was transferred from the War Department on August 10, 1933, and redesignated a national battlefield park on June 26, 1935. As with all historic areas administered by the National Park Service, the park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15,
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Petroglyph National Monument

    Petroglyph National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Petroglyph National Monument stretches 17 miles (27 km) along Albuquerque, New Mexico's West Mesa, a volcanic basalt escarpment that dominates the city’s western horizon. Authorized June 27, 1990, the 7,236 acre (29.28 km) monument is cooperatively managed by the National Park Service and the City of Albuquerque. The western boundary of the monument features a chain of dormant fissure volcanoes. Beginning in the northwest corner, Butte volcano is followed to its south by Bond, Vulcan, Black and JA volcanoes. Petroglyph National Monument protects a variety of cultural and natural resources including five volcanic cones, hundreds of archeological sites and an estimated 24,000 images carved by Ancestral Pueblo peoples and early Spanish settlers. Many of the images are recognizable as animals, people, brands and crosses; others are more complex. Their meaning was, possibly, understood only by the carver. These images are the cultural heritage of a people who have long since moved into other areas and moved on through history for many reasons. The monument is intended as a protection for these lands and sites from and for visitors to see and appreciate for generations to come. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Prouty Place State Park

    Prouty Place State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Prouty Place State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 5 acres (2 ha) in Summit Township, Potter County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Pennsylvania Route 44, along Long Tree Road, near Sweden Valley. The park provides access points for hiking, hunting and fishing in the Susquehannock State Forest. It is a small rest area for hikers and other travellers to the wilds of Potter County. Prouty Place was designated a Class "B" campground by the Pennsylvania Department of Forestry from 1922 to 1925. During the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps built the current picnic area and former campsites between 1935 and 1938. Prouty Place State Park officially became part of the Pennsylvania State Parks system in 1957. No camping is allowed at the park today. The park is a short distance from the Susquehannock Trail System, and is connected to it by a link trail. In 2000 the park became part of the Hills Creek State Park complex, an administrative grouping of eight state parks in Potter and Tioga counties. As of 2009, Prouty Place State Park is tied for second smallest state park in Pennsylvania (Upper Pine Bottom State Park, a picnic
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park

    Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park is located about 100 kilometres southeast of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada or 44 kilometres east of the community of Milk River, and straddles the Milk River itself. It is one of the largest areas of protected prairie in the Alberta park system, and serves as both a nature preserve and protection for a large number of aboriginal rock carvings and paintings. The park is important and sacred to the Blackfoot and many other aboriginal tribes. The park has been nominated by Parks Canada and the Government of Canada as a World Heritage Site. Its UNESCO application was filed under the name Áísínai’pi which is Niitsítapi (Blackfoot) meaning “it is pictured / written”. The provincial park is synonymous with the' Áísínai’pi National Historic Site of Canada. Writing-on-Stone Park contains the greatest concentration of rock art on the North American Great Plains. There are over 50 petroglyph sites and thousands of works. The park also showcases a North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) outpost reconstructed on its original site. The post was replaced since the original outpost was burned down since there was a massive fire. The park comprises 17.80 square kilometres
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Missile Crawler Transporter Facilities

    Missile Crawler Transporter Facilities

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Missile Crawler Transporter Facilities are a historic site on Merritt Island, Florida. They are part of the John F. Kennedy Space Center and consist of two buildings which service the crawler-transporters used during the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. On January 21, 2000, they were added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Porcupine Mountains

    Porcupine Mountains

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Porcupine Mountains, or Porkies, are a group of small mountains spanning the northwestern Upper Peninsula of Michigan in Ontonagon and Gogebic counties, near the shore of Lake Superior. The area is part of the Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park. The Porcupine Mountains were named by the native Ojibwa people, supposedly because their silhouette had the shape of a porcupine. The Porcupine Mountains were the site of copper mining in the 19th century. One of these mines is the Nonesuch Mine, which operated sporadically from 1867 to 1912. The Porkies are also the location of a large stand of old growth forest, and home to many black bears. The area is popular among tourists, especially the Lake of the Clouds in the heart of the mountains. The most striking geological feature of the Porcupine Mountains is the long basalt and conglomerate escarpment parallel to the Lake Superior shore and overlooking Lake of the Clouds, a continuation of the same copper-bearing bedrock found farther northeast on the Keweenaw Peninsula. A second ridge farther inland, on the other side of Lake of the Clouds, includes Summit Peak, the highest point in the mountains at 1,958 feet (595 m). Rivers,
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Käsivarsi Wilderness Area

    Käsivarsi Wilderness Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Käsivarsi Wilderness Area (Finnish: Käsivarren erämaa-alue) is the second-largest wilderness reserve in Finland. It was established in 1991 like all the other 11 wilderness areas in Lapland. Its area is 2,206 square kilometres (852 sq mi). It is the most popular wilderness area in Finland, by number of visitors. It is governed by the Metsähallitus. All Finnish fells of over 1,000 meters of height, except for Saana, are situated in the Käsivarsi Wilderness Area. Käsivarsi, the Finnish word for arm, refers to the location of the area—in the raised arm of the Maiden of Finland.
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Nyika National Park

    Nyika National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Nyika National Park is Malawi’s largest national park, with an area of 3200 km² (1250 mile). The park covers practically the whole of the Nyika Plateau in northern Malawi, about 480 km north of Lilongwe and 60 km north of Rumphi by road. Access is by a single dirt road which branches north off the road from Rumphi to the Katumbi border post, and winds its way up the south-western scarp of the plateau, continues over the top, where it forms the border with Zambia, then descends the north-west scarp in a series of bends, and continues north to the Chisenga border post. On the top of the plateau, a spur goes east to Chelinda, the headquarters of the park nearer the centre. Although the park boundary comes within 35 km of Livingstonia there is no access from the eastern side. The name, Nyika, means "where the water comes from" as the plateau's elevation makes it wetter than surrounding areas. The top is frequently in cloud in the rainy season which brings over 200 types of orchid into flower. The grasslands of Nyika are rich in wildflowers in other seasons as well. Nyika is recommended for trekking, mountain biking and horse riding safaris, as well as more conventional 4x4 excursions.
    5.67
    3 votes
    158
    Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness

    Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness was created from existing National Forest lands in 1978 and is located in Montana and Wyoming, United States. The wilderness is partly in Gallatin, Custer and Shoshone National Forests and is composed of 944,000 acres (3,820 km). The wilderness encompasses two distinct mountain ranges, namely the Beartooth and Absaroka ranges. These ranges are completely distinct geologically speaking with the Absarokas composed primarily of volcanic and metamorphic rock, while the Beartooths are made up almost entirely of granitic rocks. The Absarokas are noted for their dark and craggy appearance, lush and heavily forested valleys and abundant wildlife. The highest peak in the range, located in Wyoming, is Francs Peak at 13,153 ft (4,009 m). The Beartooths are more alpine with huge treeless plateaus and the highest peak in the state of Montana (Granite Peak 12,799 ft/3,900 m). The wilderness contains 30 peaks over 12,000 ft (3,658 m). The wilderness is an integral part of the 20-million-acre (81,000 km) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and borders Yellowstone National Park. Wilderness areas do not allow motorized or mechanical equipment including bicycles. Although
    6.50
    2 votes
    159
    Bald Eagle State Forest

    Bald Eagle State Forest

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Bald Eagle State Forest is a Pennsylvania state forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #7. The main office is located in Laurelton in Union County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. The forest is found in Centre, Clinton, Mifflin, Snyder, and Union Counties. Bald Eagle shares a common border on its western extent with Rothrock State Forest and on its northern extent with Tiadaghton State Forest. Five Pennsylvania State Parks are contained within the forest: Poe Valley, Poe Paddy, R. B. Winter, Reeds Gap, and Sand Bridge, as well as two former state parks: Snyder-Middleswarth Natural Area (formerly Snyder-Middleswarth State Park) and Hairy Johns Picnic Area (formerly a state park known as both "Hairy John's State Forest Park" and "Voneida State Forest Park"). Bald Eagle State Forest was formed as a direct result of the depletion of the forests of Pennsylvania that took place during the mid-to-late 19th century. Conservationists like Dr. Joseph Rothrock became concerned that the forests would not regrow if they were not managed properly. Lumber and Iron companies had harvested the old-growth forests for various reasons. The clear cut the forests and left behind nothing
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    Crocker Range National Park

    Crocker Range National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Crocker Range Park was established in 1984, although the area had previously been under protection as a forest reserve. It covers the north-south Crocker Range, of 1200-1800 meter mountains in Sabah, east Malaysia on the island of Borneo, which separate the western coastal plain with the rest of the state. The boundaries of the park have been surveyed, but no facilities exist at present for visitors. The park covers 1,399 km², making it the largest park in Sabah. The park consists of both hill and montane forest, with many species of flora and fauna endemic to Borneo. Maintenance of this forest cover is essential to ensuring a pure water supply for many of the towns and communities in Sabah. The park contains at least five species of primates, such as the orang-utan, gibbons and the furry tarsier with its enormous round eyes, and extremely sociable long-tailed macaques. The Padas River bisects the range between Beaufort and Tenom. Crocker Range Park is administered by Sabah Parks. Media related to Crocker Range National Park at Wikimedia Commons
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Flathead National Forest

    Flathead National Forest

    • System: United States National Forest
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Flathead National Forest is a national forest in the western part of the U.S. state of Montana. The forest covers 2,404,935 acres (3,758 sq mi; 9,732 km) of which about 1 million acres (4,000 km) is designated wilderness. It is named after the Flathead Indians who lived in the area. The forest is located in the Rocky Mountains with elevations ranging from 4,500 to 8,500 feet (1,400 to 2,600 m). The Forest provides habitat for approximately 250 species of wildlife and 22 species of fish. This includes the threatened grizzly bear, lynx, bald eagle, bull trout, a rare plant named water howellia, and the endangered gray wolf. The Flathead National Forest is bordered by Glacier National Park and Canada to the north, the Lewis and Clark National Forest and Glacier to the east, the Lolo National Forest to the south, and the Kootenai National Forest to the west. The wilderness areas in the forest are the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Great Bear Wilderness Area, and Mission Mountains Wilderness Area. Other specially-designated areas in the forest include Flathead Wild and Scenic River, Jewel Basin Hiking Area, and the Coram Experimental Forest. Some 270,000 acres (1,100 km) of
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park

    Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park (8LE1) is one of the most important archaeological sites in Florida, the capital of chiefdom and ceremonial center of the Fort Walton Culture inhabited from 1050–1500. The complex originally included seven earthwork mounds, a public plaza and numerous individual village residences. One of several major mound sites in the Florida Panhandle, the park is located in northern Tallahassee, on the south shore of Lake Jackson. The complex has been managed as a Florida State Park since 1966. On May 6, 1971, the site was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places as reference number 71000241. The site was built and occupied between 1000 and 1500 by people of the Fort Walton culture, the southernmost expression of the Mississippian culture. The scale of the site and the number and size of the mounds indicate that this was the site of a regional chiefdom, and was thus a political and religious center. After the abandonment of the Lake Jackson site the chiefdom seat was moved to Anhaica (rediscovered in 1987 by B. Calvin Jones and located within DeSoto Site Historic State Park), where in 1539 it was visited by the Hernando de Soto
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Los Cardones National Park

    Los Cardones National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Los Cardones National Park is a national park of Argentina, located in the center-west of the province of Salta, within the San Carlos and Cachi Departments, in the Argentine Northwest. The park has an area of 650 square kilometres, with hills and ravines at the height levels between 2,700 m and 5,000 m. It gets its name from the prevalence of cardones bush formations. It features fossil remains of extinct animals, as well as dinosaur tracks. The protected area was created in 1996, when the National Parks Administration acquired the land from private owners.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    St. Clement's Island

    St. Clement's Island

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Maryland Department of Natural Resources
    St. Clement's Island lies in the Potomac River near Colton's Point, Maryland, in the United States. The uninhabited island has been designated St. Clement's Island State Park. The park preserves the site of the March 25, 1634, landing of Maryland's first colonists, commemorated as Maryland Day. The island served as a convenient and non-threatening temporary base of operations for the 150 settlers, as they negotiated with the Yaocomico Indians for land for a permanent settlement. It was the site of the first mass celebrated in that part of the world, said by Jesuit Father Andrew White. It is widely believed that mass took place on the very day of the landing itself. St. Clement's Manor, including the Island, was the first manor granted by Lord Baltimore and its lord, Dr. Thomas Gerard (Gerrard), who played a significant role in 17th century Maryland history. They named the island in honor of Pope Saint Clement I, patron of mariners. The island, soon renamed Blackistone Island after the Blackistone family, came under its ownership in 1669 and remained in that family for 162 years. It was renamed St. Clement's Island once again in 1961, when the property was leased to the state of
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Suwarrow National Park

    Suwarrow National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body:
    Suwarrow National Park is located in the Cook Islands. It comprises the entire island of Suwarrow.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial

    Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial, at 301 Pine Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, preserves the home of Tadeusz (Thaddeus) Kościuszko. The life and work of the Polish patriot and hero of the American Revolution are commemorated here Kosciuszko returned to America to a hero's welcome after his wounding, capture, imprisonment, and banishment from his native Poland occupied by Russia, in 1796. Instructed to find "a dwelling as small, as remote, and as cheap" as possible, Kosciuszko's secretary, Julian Ursyn Niemcewicz, chose Mrs. Ann Relf's boarding house in Society Hill (on the corner of 3rd and Pine Streets). Here, while Kosciuszko recuperated from his wounds (rarely leaving the house), he was visited by numerous luminaries of the day, including Vice President Thomas Jefferson, architect Benjamin Latrobe, William Paterson (a signer of the US Constitution), Chief Little Turtle of the Miamis, and Chief Joseph Brant of the Mohawk. The home was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 18, 1970. The National Memorial was authorized on October 21, 1972. It is administered under Independence National Historical Park, but is counted as a separate unit of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Wilson's Creek National Battlefield

    Wilson's Creek National Battlefield

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Wilson's Creek National Battlefield at 6424 West Farm Road 182 near Republic, Missouri, preserves the site of the Battle of Wilson's Creek. Fought on August 10, 1861, it was the first major American Civil War engagement west of the Mississippi River. The Confederate's failure to exploit their victory here resulted in keeping Missouri in the Union. Major features include a 5-mile automobile tour loop, the restored 1852 Ray House, and "Bloody Hill," the scene of the major battle. The site is located just southwest of the city of Springfield, in southwestern Missouri. The Battle of Wilson's Creek, also known as the Battle of Oak Hills, was fought on August 10, 1861, near Springfield, Missouri. Union forces were striving to defeat the Missouri State Guard and preserve Missouri for the Union, along with St. Louis, a major port on the Mississippi River. The battle site was established as Wilson's Creek National Battlefield Park on April 22, 1960, and was redesignated a National Battlefield on December 16, 1970. As with all historic areas administered by the National Park Service, the battlefield was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. The visitor
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Cumberland Island National Seashore

    Cumberland Island National Seashore

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Cumberland Island National Seashore preserves most of Cumberland Island in Camden County, Georgia, the largest of Georgia's Golden Isles. The seashore features beaches and dunes, marshes, and freshwater lakes. In addition to the natural features, the seashore includes some historic properties, such as the ruins of Dungeness and the Plum Orchard estate. The island is only accessible by boat. The visitor center and boat access to the island are located in the town of St. Marys, Georgia. Public access via the ferry is limited, reservations are recommended. Camping is allowed in the seashore. The 9,886-acre (40.01 km) Cumberland Island Wilderness is part of the seashore. The Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum is located in St. Marys, Georgia on the mainland entrance to the seashore, across from the park's visitor center. Exhibits focus on the island's natural and cultural history, including the Timucua Indians, cotton plantations that were established by American Revolutionary hero General Nathaniel Greene and cotton-gin inventor Eli Whitney, the history of the ruined mansion Dungeness and the Plum Orchard estate, and area activities during the War of 1812. The museum is
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella National Park

    Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Dovrefjell–Sunndalsfjella National Park (Norwegian: Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella nasjonalpark) is a National Park in Norway. It was founded in 2002 to replace and enlarge the former Dovrefjell National Park, originally founded in 1974. It occupies 1,693 km² and encompasses areas in three Norwegian counties: Oppland, Sør-Trøndelag, and Møre og Romsdal and includes large parts of the mountain range of Dovrefjell. The National Park was established to - preserve a large, continuous and essentially untouched mountain area, - preserve an alpine ecosystem with its natural biodiversity, - preserve an important part of the range of the stocks of wild reindeer in Snøhetta and Knutshø, - safeguard a variation in habitats, - preserve the landscape morphology and its distinctive geological deposits, - protect cultural heritage. The public do have access to experience the nature through the exercise of the traditional and simple outdoor life, with technical infrastructure only established to a very modest extent. In short: To preserve an intact alpine ecosystem with its indigenous wild reindeer. Together with the reindeer in Rondane National Park the last remaining population of wild Fennoscandian
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Falling Waters State Park

    Falling Waters State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Falling Waters State Park is a 171-acre (69 ha) Florida state park located three miles (5 km) south of Chipley, Washington County in northwestern Florida. The park contains a 73-foot (22 m) waterfall, the highest in the state. The sinkholes at Falling Waters State Park were used as a hideout by Indian warriors fighting against Andrew Jackson during the Seminole Wars. The park is the site of a Civil War era gristmill. The gristmill was powered by the waterfall in Falling Waters Sink. Later, in 1891, a distillery was constructed on the site. The park is also the site of the first oil well in Florida. It was drilled in 1919 based on information from local legends and a 400 year old Spanish diary. The well, which reached a depth of 4,912 feet (1,497 m) never proved to hold a commercially viable amount of oil and was capped in 1921. The park was deeded to the state in 1962 by the Washington County Development authority. Park facilities such as a picnic pavilion and restrooms were constructed soon after. An archaeologic dig, led by the University of West Florida in 2007, revealed Indian artifacts that were between 1,000 - 1,500 years old. Items found included bits of pottery, Indian
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Milton State Park

    Milton State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Milton State Park is an 82 acres (33 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Milton in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is on Montgomery Island in the West Branch Susquehanna River, just east of the village of West Milton in Union County. Milton State Park is on Pennsylvania Route 642. The recorded history of Milton State Park begins in 1762 when Marcus Huling Jr. made a claim on the island in the West Branch Susquehanna River. Huling planted an apple orchard on what was to become known as Montgomery Island. Ownership of the island eventually transferred to the Straub Family. The Straubs built a dam across part of the river in 1824. The Straubs ran a sawmill and gristmill on the island and built a bridge between the island to the banks of the West Branch Susquehanna River. In time, the mills closed and the land was used for farming. The island was no longer used for farming by the early 1900s. Over the next 60 years the island was divided among several owners and used as a picnic ground with several athletic fields. The Milton Rotary Club and the Borough of Milton worked together to consolidate the deeds and transferred ownership of Montgomery Island to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park

    New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park is a U.S. National Historical Park in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana, near the French Quarter. It was created in 1994 to celebrate the origins and evolution of jazz, America’s most widely-recognized genre of music. The park consists of 4 acres (16,000 m) within Louis Armstrong Park leased by the National Park Service. The park has an office, visitors center, and concert venue several blocks away in the French Quarter. It provides a setting to share the cultural history of the people and places that helped shape the development and progression of jazz in New Orleans. The park preserves information and resources associated with the origins and early development of jazz through interpretive techniques designed to educate and entertain. The centerpiece of the site is Perseverance Hall No. 4. Originally a Masonic Lodge, it was built between 1819 and 1820, making it the oldest Masonic temple in Louisiana. Perseverance Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 2, 1973. The entire National Historical Park was administratively listed on the Register on the date of its authorization, October 31,
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Oregon Caves National Monument

    Oregon Caves National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Oregon Caves National Monument is a national monument in the northern Siskiyou Mountains of southwestern Oregon in the United States. The main part of the 488-acre (197 ha) park, including the marble cave and a visitor center, is located 20 miles (32 km) east of Cave Junction, on Oregon Route 46. A separate visitor center in Cave Junction occupies 4 acres (1.6 ha) of the total. Both parts of the monument, managed by the National Park Service, are in southwestern Josephine County, near the Oregon–California border. The climate is generally mild even at the cave's elevation of about 4,000 feet (1,200 m) above sea level, but icicles can form at the cave entrance, and winter snow sometimes blocks the park highway. Elijah Davidson, a resident of nearby Williams, discovered the cave in 1874. Over the next two decades, private investors failed in efforts to run successful tourist ventures at the publicly owned site. After passage of the Antiquities Act by the United States Congress, President William Howard Taft established Oregon Caves National Monument, to be managed by the United States Forest Service, in 1909. The popularity of the automobile, construction of paved highways, and
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial

    Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial commemorates the Battle of Lake Erie, near Ohio's South Bass Island, in which Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry led a fleet to victory in one of the most significant naval battles to occur in the War of 1812. The memorial also celebrates the lasting peace between Britain, Canada, and the United States that followed the war. A 352 foot (107 m) monument — the world's most massive Doric column — was constructed in Put-in-Bay, Ohio by a multi-state commission from 1912 to 1915 "to inculcate the lessons of international peace by arbitration and disarmament." Beneath the stone floor of the monument lie the remains of three American officers and three British officers. It is among the tallest monuments in the United States (the Gateway Arch, San Jacinto Monument, and the Washington Monument are taller). Although substantially completed in 1915, funding problems prevented the proper completion of a fully realized memorial complex. In 1919 the federal government assumed control of the monument and provided additional funding. The official dedication was celebrated on July 31, 1931. In 2002, 2.4 million dollars was spent on a new visitor center.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Triglav National Park

    Triglav National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Triglav National Park (TNP) (Slovene: Triglavski narodni park) is the only national park in Slovenia. It was established in its modern form in 1981 and is located in the northwestern part of the country, respectively the southeastern part of the Alpine massif. Mount Triglav, the highest peak of Julian Alps, stands almost in the middle of the national park. From it the valleys spread out radially, supplying water to two large river systems with their sources in the Julian Alps: the Soča and the Sava, flowing to the Adriatic and Black Sea, respectively. The proposal for the protection of the Triglav Lakes Valley area was first put forward by the seismologist Albin Belar in 1906 or 1908. However, the proposal was not accepted, as there was no legal base for it and the then valid laws prohibited any restriction of pasture. The strategic basis for the protection of the area, titled The Memorandum (Spomenica), and which explicitly mentioned the proposal of Belar, was submitted to the Provincial Government for Slovenia in 1920. The idea was finally implemented in 1924. Then, at an initiative by the Nature Protection Section of the Slovene Museum Society together with the Slovene
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Bryce Canyon National Park

    Bryce Canyon National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Bryce Canyon National Park ( /ˈbraɪs/) is a national park located in southwestern Utah in the United States. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon which, despite its name, is not a canyon but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. Bryce is distinctive due to geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of the river and lake bed sedimentary rocks. The red, orange, and white colors of the rocks provide spectacular views for park visitors. Bryce sits at a much higher elevation than nearby Zion National Park. The rim at Bryce varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet (2,400 to 2,700 m). The Bryce Canyon area was settled by Mormon pioneers in the 1850s and was named after Ebenezer Bryce, who homesteaded in the area in 1874. The area around Bryce Canyon became a U.S. National Monument in 1923 and was designated as a national park in 1928. The park covers 35,835 acres (55.99 sq mi; 145.02 km) and receives relatively few visitors compared to Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon, largely due to its remote location. Bryce Canyon National Park is located in southwestern Utah about 50 miles (80 km)
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Buck Island Reef National Monument

    Buck Island Reef National Monument

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Buck Island Reef National Monument, or just Buck Island is a small, uninhabited, 176 acre (712,000 m²) island about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of the northeast coast of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. It was first established as a protected area by the U.S. Government in 1948, with the intention of preserving “one of the finest marine gardens in the Caribbean Sea.” The U.S. National Monument was created in 1961 by John F. Kennedy and greatly expanded in 2001 by Bill Clinton, over the bitter opposition of local fishermen. Most of the Monument area, which is administered by the National Park Service, is underwater and attracts around 50,000 visitors a year. With its 4,554-acre (18.43 km) long reef there is plenty to explore and experience in the water. Snorkelers can follow an underwater marked trail on the eastern tip. It is one of only three underwater trails in the United States. Along the trail are plaques denoting information about marine flora and fauna commonly found in the area. Two thirds of the island is surrounded by an elkhorn coral barrier reef, providing an ecosystem for over 250 fish species and a variety of other marine life including spotted eagle rays, nurse sharks
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    East Humboldt Wilderness

    East Humboldt Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The East Humboldt Wilderness is a protected wilderness area in the East Humboldt Range of Elko County, in the northeast section of the state of Nevada in the western United States. The East Humboldt Wilderness covers an area of approximately 36,900 acres (149 km), and is administered by the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Kobuk Valley National Park

    Kobuk Valley National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Kobuk Valley National Park is in northwestern Alaska 25 miles (40 km) north of the Arctic Circle. It was designated a United States National Park in 1980 by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. It is noted for the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes and caribou migration routes. The park offers backcountry camping, hiking, backpacking, and dog sledding. There are no designated trails or roads in the park, which at 1,750,716 acres (2,735.49 sq mi; 7,084.90 km), is approximately the size of the state of Delaware. No roads lead to the park. It is reachable by foot, dogsled, snowmobile, and chartered air taxis from Nome and Kotzebue year-round. The park is one of the least visited in the National Park System. The park is the center of a vast ecosystem between Selawik National Wildlife Refuge and the Noatak National Preserve. It is over 75 miles (121 km) by river to the Chukchi Sea. The Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve lie 32 miles (51 km) to the east. The park consists of the broad wetlands valley of the Kobuk River which runs along the southern edge of the western Brooks Range, which is known as the Baird Mountains. The boundary of the park runs along the
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Lakeland Provincial Park

    Lakeland Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body:
    Lakeland Provincial Park and Lakeland Provincial Recreation Area are located east of Lac La Biche, Alberta, Canada, in Lac La Biche County. The Park contains numerous lakes, such as Kinnaird, Jackson, McGuffin, Dabbs, Shaw, and Blackett, as well as many other smaller waterbodies. The Lakeland Provincial Recreation Area contains Pinehurst Lake, Seibert, Touchwood and Ironwood Lakes. Discussions of Lakeland Provincial Park were ongoing for decades before the park was designated in 1992. During the 1960s and 1970s the region was under consideration as a public recreation area. Increasing use led to the construction of small-scale facilities by the provincial Department of Highways and the Forest Service. In 1972 a park reservation was created from Lac La Biche to Cold Lake, which includes the areas now in Lakeland Provincial Park. By the late 1980s, the existing facilities were facing substantial use pressures. Reports from the provincial government described the recreational infrastructure as "minimal" and suggested improving the "limited road access." Discussing the park's potential, the then Deputy Minister of Renewable Resources stated: In 1975 a government task force was struck
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Lauhanvuori National Park

    Lauhanvuori National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Lauhanvuori National Park (Finnish: Lauhanvuoren kansallispuisto) is a national park in the Southern Ostrobothnia region of Finland, on the border of Kauhajoki and Isojoki. It was established in 1982 and covers 53 square kilometres (20 sq mi). The park is characterized by its pine forestland, spring brooks, and swamps. The Lauhanvuori mountain is a 231 m (758 ft) high moraine mountain and one of the highest points in Western Finland. The summit area was uncovered 9500 BCE when the glacier retreated, and it has never been under the water. Indeed, it was an island in the middle of the Ancylus Lake. The summit of Lauhanvuori is lusher than its surroundings due to not having been under the sea and thus having retained its loose soil and nutrients. The hillsides are barren and infertile. Cranes and capercaillies can be heard in the bogs during summertime. The willow grouse also inhabits the bogs. The park also has a hectare of fen, where Succisa pratensis, brown beak sedge, carnation sedge, moor rush, Scottish asphodel, and many rare mosses grow. Lauhanvuori is the southernmost habitat of the Scottisch asphodel.
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Laurel Summit State Park

    Laurel Summit State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Laurel Summit State Park is a 6-acre (2.4 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Cook Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is also a picnic area with a scenic view of Linn Run on the summit of Laurel Mountain. The temperatures at Laurel Summit State Park are generally several degrees cooler than the surrounding towns in the valleys. The elevation of the park is 2,739 feet (835 m) above sea level. The area in and surrounding Laurel Summit State Park is now a thriving second growth forest. One hundred years ago it was generally described as a "waste land". The ridges of the Laurel Mountain had once been covered with old-growth forest. These forests were clear cut during the lumber era that swept over most of the mountains and forests of Pennsylvania during the mid-to-late 19th century and very early 20th century. The lumberman stripped the mountains. They took the logs to the sawmill where they were cut into lumber. Smaller logs were used to reinforce the mine shafts of the many coal mines throughout southwestern Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The bark of the hemlock tree was used as a source of tannin at the tanneries of the area. The only thing the
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Mackinac Island State Park

    Mackinac Island State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Mackinac Island State Park is a state park located on Mackinac Island in the U.S. state of Michigan. The island park encompasses 2.81 mi² (7.28 km²), which is approximately 74% of the island's total area of 3.78 mi² (9.78 km²). The park is also within the boundaries of the city of Mackinac Island and has permanent residents within its boundaries. M-185 circles the perimeter of the park as the only motorless highway in the state due to the island's ban of automobiles. The park is governed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Mackinac Island State Park Commission. On July 15, 2009, the park celebrated its 20 millionth visitor. The park was first established as Mackinac National Park in 1875, which was the second national park established in the United States after Yellowstone National Park. In 1895, it was transferred to state control and reorganized as Mackinac Island State Park, which was the first state park in Michigan. The park contains many important historical and geological features, such as Fort Mackinac, Fort Holmes, other historic buildings, historic sites, limestone caves, and other unique rock formations. The park also operates the Mackinac Island
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Sagarmatha National Park

    Sagarmatha National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Sagarmāthā National Park is a protected area in the Himalayas of eastern Nepal containing the southern half of Mount Everest. The park was created on July 19, 1976 and was inscribed as a Natural World Heritage Site in 1979. Sagarmāthā is a Sanskrit word, from sagar = "sky" (not to be confused with "sea/ocean") and māthā = "forehead" or "head", and is the modern Nepali name for Mount Everest. The park encompasses an area of 1,148 km (443 sq mi) in the Solukhumbu District and ranges in elevation from 2,845 m (9,334 ft) at Jorsalle to 8,848 m (29,029 ft) at the summit of Mount Everest. Barren land above 5,000 m (16,000 ft) comprises 69% of the park while 28% is grazing land and the remaining 3% is forested. Most of the park area is very rugged and steep, with its terrain cut by deep rivers and glaciers. Unlike other parks, this park can be divided into four climate zones because of the rising altitude. The climatic zones include a forested lower zone, a zone of alpine scrub, the upper alpine zone which includes upper limit of vegetation growth, and the Arctic zone where no plants can grow. The types of plants and animals that are found in the park depend on the altitude. The park
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Fort Foster

    Fort Foster

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: Florida Department of Environmental Protection
    Fort Foster (now known as Fort Foster Historic Site) was a fort in central Florida, located 9 miles south of current-day Zephyrhills in Pasco County. It was built in December 1836 under the direction of Lt. Col. William S. Foster on the site of Fort Alabama. This had been abandoned by federal troops at the end of the Seminole Wars, booby trapped and exploded by gunpowder on the reported approach of Seminole. The site was significant for a battle in 1837 during the Seminole Wars, when United States forces resisted a Seminole attack. The following year, the US abandoned the fort because of disease among its forces. Fort Foster was reactivated as needed from time to time in 1837, 1841-1842, and 1849 to meet the needs of the military when Seminole activity threatened. The fort site was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on June 13, 1972. A replica of the fort was constructed at the site by the state, and it is owned and operated by the Florida State Park system. It is in the Hillsborough River State Park.
    5.00
    3 votes
    186
    Bear Mountain State Park

    Bear Mountain State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Bear Mountain State Park is located on the west side of the Hudson River in Orange and Rockland counties of New York. The 5,067-acre (20.51 km) park offers biking, hiking, boating, picnicking, swimming, cross-country skiing, cross-country running, sledding and ice skating. It also includes several facilities such as the Perkins Memorial Tower, the Trailside Museum and Zoo, the Bear Mountain Inn, a carousel, pool and skating rink. It is managed by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission. The park includes Bear Mountain as well as Dunderberg Mountain and West Mountain. Fort Montgomery is adjacent to the north edge of the park while Iona Island Bird Sanctuary is on the eastern edge in the Hudson River. The park is a separate entity from the adjacent Harriman State Park which runs along the western edge of the park. It lies within the Northeastern coastal forests ecoregion. During the American Revolution when control of the Hudson River was viewed by the British as essential to dominating the American territories, the area that was to become the park saw several significant military engagements. In 1777 British troops routed Patriots at Fort Montgomery. Anthony Wayne's attack of the
    5.50
    2 votes
    187
    Black Hills National Forest

    Black Hills National Forest

    • System: United States National Forest
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Black Hills National Forest is located in southwestern South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming. The forest has an area of over 1.25 million acres (5,066 km²) and is managed by the Forest Service. Forest headquarters are located in Custer, South Dakota. There are local ranger district offices in Custer, Rapid City, and Spearfish in South Dakota, and in Sundance, Wyoming. Predominantly ponderosa pine, the forest also includes hard woods like aspen, bur oak, and birch. The lower elevations include grassland prairie, but the National Forest System lands encompass most of the mountainous region known as the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Within the forest is Harney Peak which is the tallest mountain in South Dakota and the highest peak east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. After a series of devastating wildfires in 1893, U.S. President Grover Cleveland created the Black Hills Forest Reserve on February 22, 1897. Upon the creation of the Forest Service in 1905, the reserve was transferred to the new agency under the United States Department of Agriculture and redesignated as a National Forest two years later. Lakota words Paha Sapa meaning "hills that are black" may
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park

    Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Khao Sam Roi Yot (Thai: เขาสามร้อยยอด) is a marine national park in Sam Roi Yot district, Prachuap Khiri Khan Province, Thailand. It covers 98.08 km², of which 20.88 km² are marine areas. The park was established in 1966, and was the first coastal national park of Thailand. The name Khao Sam Roi Yot means Mountains with 300 peaks, which describes the landscape of the park quite well. The limestone hills are a subrange of the Tenasserim Hills that rises directly at the shore of the Gulf of Thailand, with the highest elevation Khao Krachom 605m above sea level. Between the hills are freshwater marshes. However several of these marshes were converted into shrimp farms, as only 36 km² of the total 69 km² of marshes are part of the national park. 18 km² of these marshes are scheduled to be declared a Ramsar site. Two white sand beaches are located within the park namely Hat Laem Sala and Hat Sam Phraya. Hat Laem Sala is 17 km away from the park's head quarters and can be reached from the village Ban Pu either by boat or by climbing up and down over a hill for nearly 30 minutes. Rare animals in the park include the Mainland Serow (Nemorhaedus sumatraensis), Dusky Langurs (Trachypithecus
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

    Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail is a route across the United States commemorating the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804 to 1806. It is part of the National Trails System of the United States. It extends for some 3,700 miles from Wood River, Illinois to the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon. The trail is administered by the National Park Service, but sites along the trail are managed by federal land management agencies, state, local, tribal, and private organizations. The trail is not a hiking trail, but provides opportunities for hiking, boating and horseback riding at many locations along the route. The trail is the second longest of the 23 National Scenic and National Historic Trails. It passes through portions of Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The official headquarters for the trail is located at the National Park Service Mid-West Regional Headquarters, in Omaha, Nebraska. The visitor center features exhibits about the explorers and their historic trip, as well as information about sites along the trail. In 1948 the National Park Service proposed a "Lewis and Clark Tourway" along the Missouri
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Manassas National Battlefield Park

    Manassas National Battlefield Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Manassas National Battlefield Park, located north of Manassas, in Prince William County, Virginia, preserves the site of two major American Civil War battles: the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, and the Second Battle of Bull Run which was fought between August 28 and August 30, 1862 (also known as the First Battle of Manassas and the Second Battle of Manassas, respectively). The peaceful Virginia countryside bore witness to clashes between the armies of the North (Union) and South (Confederacy), and it was here that Confederate General Thomas J. Jackson acquired his nickname "Stonewall." Today the National Battlefield Park provides the opportunity for visitors to explore the historic terrain where men fought and died more than a century ago. More than 900,000 people visit the battlefield each year. (In comparison, roughly 15 million people annually visit nearby Washington, DC.) As an historic area under the National Park Service, the park was administratively listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. The Henry Hill Visitor Center, on Sudley Road by the south entrance to the park, offers exhibits and interpretation regarding the First Battle
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Mount Aspiring National Park

    Mount Aspiring National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Mount Aspiring National Park is located in the Southern Alps of the South Island of New Zealand, north of Fiordland National Park, and between Otago and south Westland. The park forms part of the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It was established in 1964 as New Zealand's tenth National Park. The park covers 3,555 km² at the southern end of the Southern Alps, directly to the west of Lake Wanaka, and is popular for tramping, walking and mountaineering. Mount Aspiring / Tititea (3033 m) is the mountain which gives the park its name. Other prominent peaks within the park include Mount Pollux (2542 m) and Mount Brewster (2519 m). The Haast Pass, one of the three principal road routes across the Southern Alps, is found in the north-eastern corner of the park. In April 2005 the Nature Heritage Fund purchased private land in the Landsborough River valley as an addition to the park. In 2006, the Milford Dart Company asked the Department of Conservation to amend the Mt Aspiring National Park Management Plan to allow an additional road within the park for a bus tunnel from the Routeburn Road to the Hollyford Valley to take tourists to Milford Sound. In December 2007, the New Zealand
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Old Haulover Canal

    Old Haulover Canal

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Haulover Canal is a waterway north of Merritt Island, Florida, near the former site of Allenhurst, that connects Mosquito Lagoon with the Indian River, and is part of the Intracoastal Waterway. In the early 1960s there were plans to relocate the canal further north, near the junction of US 1 and Courtenay Parkway, but by 1964 when the new Haulover Canal Bridge was constructed these plans had been shelved. The Old Haulover Canal is a historic location north of Merritt Island, Florida. On December 19, 1978, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. According to the state historical marker near the site: Native Americans, explorers and settlers hauled or carried canoes and small boats over this narrow strip of land between Mosquito Lagoon and the Indian River. Eventually it became known as the “haulover.” Connecting both bodies of water had long challenged early settlers of this area. Spaniards visited as early as 1605 and slid boats over the ground covered with mulberry tree bark. Early settlers used rollers and skids to drag schooners across. Fort Ann was established nearby in 1837, during the 2nd Seminole War (1835-1842), to protect the haulover from
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Perämeri National Park

    Perämeri National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Perämeri National Park (Perämeren kansallispuisto, Bottenvikens nationalpark, literally "Bay of Bothnia National Park") is a national park in Lapland, Finland. The park which was established in 1991, covers 157 km² of which 2.5 km² is on land. It is maintained by Metsähallitus. The islands in the area have been formed by post-glacial rebound, and the scenery is still in a constant state of change. There are also numerous traditional fishing bases. The national park is reachable by boat although visiting is only recommended for experienced boaters.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Poe Valley State Park

    Poe Valley State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Poe Valley State Park is a 620-acre (251 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Penn Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is surrounded by Bald Eagle State Forest. Poe Paddy State Park is 4 miles (6.4 km) to the west. The forests of the park surround the 25-acre (10 ha) Poe Lake. Poe Valley State Park is in isolated Poe Valley which lies between Potters Mills on U.S. Route 322 and Millheim on Pennsylvania Route 45. The park was closed during the 2008 and 2009 season while the lake was drained for dam repairs and the park facilities were upgraded. Poe Valley State Park and nearby Poe Paddy State Park were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The young men of the CCC also worked to clear the regrowing forests of brush to prevent forest fires. They constructed roads throughout the forests, built state park facilities, constructed bridges on the state roads, planted trees for reforestation, and cleaned streams. Poe Lake is a man-made lake covering 25 acres (10 ha), built by the Civilian Conservation Corps on Big Poe Creek during the Great Depression. The lake provides a habitat for perch, pickerel, sunfish, catfish,
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

    Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness is a protected wilderness area in the states of Idaho and Montana, in the northwestern United States. At 1.3 million acres (5,300 km²), it is one of the largest designated wilderness areas in the United States (14th overall, but third-largest outside Alaska). It spans the Bitterroot Mountain Range, on the border between Idaho and Montana. It covers parts of Bitterroot National Forest, Clearwater National Forest, Lolo National Forest, and the Nez Perce National Forest. The Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness Area is immediately to its south, separated only by a dirt road (the Magruder Corridor). Together with adjoining unprotected public land, the two wilderness areas form a five million acre (20,000 km²) wild region. It is here that the Lochsa and Selway rivers form and flow westward to their confluence at Lowell (outside of the wilderness along U.S. Route 12) to form the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River. The land ranges in elevation from 1,700 feet (520 m) on the Lochsa River to 10,157 feet (3,096 m) at Trapper Peak in the Bitterroot Mountains. One of the largest elk herds in the United States calls the wilderness home, and it also boasts
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Sipsey Wilderness

    Sipsey Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Sipsey Wilderness lies within Bankhead National Forest around the Sipsey Fork of the Black Warrior River in northwestern Alabama, USA. The Sipsey Wilderness is the largest wilderness area east of the Mississippi River. Designated in 1975 and expanded in 1988, the 24,922-acre (10,086 ha) Sipsey is the largest and most frequently visited Wilderness area in Alabama and contains dozens of waterfalls. It was also the first designated wilderness area east of the Mississippi River. The wilderness consists of the low plateau of Brindley Mountain which is dissected into a rough landscape by several creeks and rivers. Due to the layers of limestone and sandstone that make up the area, waterfalls are very common in the wilderness. This feature has earned the wilderness the nickname "Land of 1000 Waterfalls." The wilderness is in the Appalachian mixed mesophytic forests ecoregion. Much of the wilderness was once logged, but new growth forests have now taken hold in the logged areas. Some old-growth forests can also be found in the wilderness. The most significant are about 260 acres (110 ha) along Bee Branch Gorge and Buck Rough Canyon, which include old Eastern Hemlock, American Beech,
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Sterling State Park

    Sterling State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Sterling State Park in the United States is the only Michigan state park located on the shores of Lake Erie. The park encompasses 2.03 mi² (5.26 km²) just northeast of Monroe, Michigan in Frenchtown Charter Township in Monroe County. The park was established in 1920. The park sits just north of where the River Raisin empties into Lake Erie. The park is located just south of Sandy Creek and the community of Detroit Beach. The park is located less than a mile from Interstate 75, which provides easy access from the neighboring areas of Detroit, Toledo, and Windsor. The main attractions at the park include the beach, a boat launch, and shore fishing. There are over six miles (9.66 km) of biking and hiking trails within the park. Sterling State Park was established in an effort to preserve the Lake Erie coastline after decades of pollutants from the Detroit River emptied into the region— killing off tremendous amounts of wildlife and leaving the lake largely uninhabitable. For quite some time, Sterling State Park was greatly polluted by river runoff from Detroit, and swimming in the water was not recommended and even illegal. After decades and millions of dollars spent, the region was
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Lost River Range

    Lost River Range

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Lost River Range is a group of high mountains located in central Idaho, in the northwestern United States. It runs southeast for approximately 75 miles (120 km) from the Salmon River near the community of Challis to the Snake River Valley near Arco. To the west are the valleys of the Salmon and the Big Lost Rivers, while to the east are the Little Lost River and Pashimeroi Valleys. The range starts at the east bank of the Salmon River, at an elevation of about 5000 feet (1525 m). It quickly rises to Grouse Creek Mountain (11,085 ft, 3378 m) and Dickey Peak (11,141 ft, 3395 m), and then descends to Double Springs Pass, location of one of just two roads to cross the range. Nearby is an interpretive site explaining the effects of the magnitude 6.9 Borah Peak Earthquake that hit the range on October 28, 1983. The Big Lost River Valley fell and the Lost River Range rose, leaving a fault scarp of up to 14 feet (5 m) along the base of the mountains. The range then rises into its high central section, which includes many of the state's highest peaks. Borah Peak, the highest, climbs to 12,662 feet (3859 m). Further south are Mount Idaho (12,065 ft, 3677 m), Leatherman Peak (12,228 ft,
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

    Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Established on June 11, 1940, Cumberland Gap National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located at the border between Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. The Cumberland Gap is a sizable natural break in the Appalachian Mountains. The park lies in parts of Bell and Harlan counties in Kentucky, Claiborne County in Tennessee, and Lee County in Virginia. The park contains the Kentucky-Virginia-Tennessee tri-state area, accessible via a short trail. Cumberland Gap National Historical Park covers 20,508 acres (8,299 ha), and saw 828,947 visitors in 2011. The Cumberland Gap Visitor Center is located on U.S. Highway 25E just southeast of Middlesboro, Kentucky and just northwest of the Cumberland Gap Tunnel and Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. The visitor center features a museum with interactive exhibits about the Gap's role as a transportation corridor, an auditorium that shows films about the area's cultural and natural history, a book store and the Cumberland Crafts gift shop. The visitor center is open each day of the year except Christmas Day. The gap was long used by Native Americans, as many species of migratory animals passed through it from north to south each
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Dark Canyon Wilderness

    Dark Canyon Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Dark Canyon Wilderness, in the heart of southeast Utah's canyon country, is named for its high steep walls that narrow in the lower section so that they block the light in the morning and late afternoon. The roughly horseshoe-shaped wilderness is made up of the upper part of 40-mile (64 km) long Dark Canyon and two major tributaries, Woodenshoe Canyon and Peavine Canyon in the Manti-La Sal National Forest. These canyons all descend from pine-covered Elk Ridge northeast of Natural Bridges National Monument. Dark Canyon continues west within a U.S. Bureau of Land Management primitive area that is recommended for wilderness designation. The last four miles of the main canyon drop steeply through Glen Canyon National Recreation Area into Lake Powell. Life zones range from ponderosa pine and aspen-covered high country to desert vegetation in the bottom of Dark Canyon. High terraced castle-like sandstone walls tower 3,000 feet (910 m) above the canyon floors. Wildlife species include mule deer, some mountain lions, black bear and bighorn sheep. This diverse canyon country contains arches, springs, seeps and hanging gardens. Water sources in Dark Canyon are often widely separated, and
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Hyner Run State Park

    Hyner Run State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Hyner Run State Park is a 180-acre (73 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Chapman Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is 6 miles (9.7 km) east of Renovo and 3 miles (5 km) north of Hyner on Pennsylvania Route 120 (Route 120 here is also known as Bucktail State Park Natural Area). Hyner Run State Park is surrounded by Sproul State Forest. Hyner Run State Park was the site of a Civilian Conservation Corps camp (Camp S-75-PA). The CCC provided work for the unemployed young men of the Great Depression. Camp S-75-PA was one of many such camps spread throughout Pennsylvania. The young men of CCC Company 310 worked to clear the regrowing forests of brush to prevent forest fires. They also constructed roads throughout the forests, built state park facilities, constructed bridges on the state roads, planted trees for reforestation, and cleaned streams. Camp S-75-PA was built by the men in the summer, fall and winter of 1933. The camp was in such a remote area that electricity was not available. A generating plant was installed to provide the camp with electricity and a 4,000 US gallons (15,000 l; 3,300 imp gal) reservoir was built to supply the camp's water
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Riding Mountain National Park

    Riding Mountain National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Parks Canada
    Riding Mountain National Park is a national park in Manitoba, Canada. The park sits atop the Manitoba Escarpment. Consisting of a protected area 2,969 km (1,146 sq mi), the forested parkland stands in sharp contrast to the surrounding prairie farmland. It was designated a National Park because it protects three different ecosystems that converge in the area; grasslands, upland boreal and eastern deciduous forests. The park is home to wolves, moose, elk, black bears, hundreds of bird species, countless insects and a captive bison herd. It is most easily reached by Highway 10 which passes through the park. The south entrance is at the townsite of Wasagaming, which is the only commercial centre within the park boundaries. The park was first protected in 1929 and had much of its public infrastructure created during the 1930s by labourers participating in Canada's great depression relief programs. Much of this early construction survives to this day. During World War II it was home to a prisoner of war camp which has since been dismantled. In 1986, Riding Mountain was designated a biosphere reserve by UNESCO. Riding Mountain National Park is easily accessible by car and bus from centres
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Shiretoko National Park

    Shiretoko National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Shiretoko National Park (知床国立公園, Shiretoko Kokuritsu Kōen) covers most of the Shiretoko Peninsula at the northeastern tip of the island of Hokkaidō, Japan. The word "Shiretoko" is derived form an Ainu word "sir etok", meaning "end of the Earth". One of the most remote regions in all of Japan, much of the peninsula is only accessible on foot or by boat. The park is best known as the home of Japan's largest brown bear population and for offering views of the disputed Kunashiri Island, claimed by Japan. The park has a hot springs waterfall called Kamuiwakka Falls (カムイワッカの滝, Kamuiwakka-no-taki). Kamui wakka means "water of the gods" in Ainu. The forests of the park are temperate and subalpine mixed forests; the main tree species include Sakhalin fir (Abies sachalinensis), Erman's birch (Betula ermanii) and Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica). Beyond the forest limit there are impenetrable Siberian Dwarf Pine (Pinus pumila) thickets. In 2005, UNESCO designated the area a World Heritage Site, advising to develop the property jointly with Kuril Islands of Russia as a transboundary "World Heritage Peace Park".
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Singalila National Park

    Singalila National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Singalila National Park is a national park of India located on the Singalila Ridge at an altitude of more than 7000 feet above sea level, in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal. It is well known for the trekking route to Sandakphu that runs through it. The park was declared a Wildlife Sanctuary in 1986, and was made an Indian National Park in 1992. The region had long been used as the trekking route from Manebhanjang to Sandakphu (the highest peak of West Bengal) and Phalut. Political Geography: The park is located in the Darjeeling subdivision, Darjeeling district, West Bengal, India. It is bordered on the north by the state of Sikkim and on the west by the country of Nepal. Physical Geography: The park is part of the Eastern Himalayas. The Singalila Ridge, which runs roughly North to South and separates Himalayan West Bengal from the other Eastern Himalayan ranges to the west of it. The two highest peaks of West Bengal, Sandakphu (3630 m) and Phalut (3600 m), are located on the ridge and inside the park. River Rammam and River Sirikhola flow through the park. The park has no significant history of human settlement. However, small settlements have grown up along the trekking
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    African American Civil War Memorial

    African American Civil War Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The African American Civil War Memorial, at the corner of Vermont Avenue, 10th St, and U Street NW in Washington, D.C., commemorates the service of 209,145 African-American soldiers and sailors who fought for the Union in the United States Civil War. The sculpture The Spirit of Freedom, a 9-foot bronze statue by Ed Hamilton of Louisville, Kentucky, was commissioned by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities in 1993 and completed in 1997. The memorial includes a walking area with curved panel short walls inscribed with the names of the men who served in the war. The complex is located at the eastern entrance to the U Street Metro station. The memorial was developed by the African American Civil War Memorial Freedom Foundation and Museum. It was transferred to the National Park Service (NPS) on October 27, 2004. The National Mall and Memorial Parks office of the NPS now manages the site. The related African American Civil War Museum is located directly across from the memorial at 1925 Vermont Avenue. From July 16–18, 2011, it celebrated its grand opening in a new and permanent facility at this address, with a weekend of speakers and events devoted to "Racial Reconciliation". It
    4.33
    3 votes
    206
    Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

    Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

    • System: National Landscape Conservation System
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body: United States Bureau of Land Management
    Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, located 40 miles southwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico (near Cochiti), is a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) managed site that was established as a U.S. National Monument by President Bill Clinton in January 2001 shortly before leaving office. Kasha-Katuwe means "white cliffs" in the Pueblo language Keresan. The area owes its remarkable geology to layers of volcanic rock and ash deposited by Pyroclastic flow from a volcanic explosion within the Jemez Volcanic Field that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago. Over time, weathering and erosion of these layers has created canyons and tent rocks. The tent rocks themselves are cones of soft pumice and tuff beneath harder caprocks, and vary in height from a few feet to 90 feet. The monument is open for day use only and may be closed by order of the Cochiti Pueblo Tribal Governor. A 1.2 mile (1.9 km) recreation trail leads up through a slot canyon to a lookout point where the tent rocks may be viewed from above. A 1.3 mile (2 km) loop trail leads past their base. The park is located on the Pajarito Plateau between 5700 and 6400 feet (1737–1951 m) above sea level. The monument is closed to dogs. The
    4.33
    3 votes
    207
    Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area

    Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area located in Kentucky and Tennessee between Lake Barkley and Kentucky Lake. The area was designated a national recreation area by President John F. Kennedy in 1963. The recreation area was originally managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority but jurisdiction has since been transferred to the United States Forest Service. The Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers flow very close to each other in the northwestern corner of Middle Tennessee and Western Kentucky, separated by a rather narrow and mostly low ridge. The area of land that separates the two bodies of water by only a few miles became known as "Between the Rivers" since at least the 1830s or 1840s. After the Cumberland River was impounded in the 1960s and a canal was constructed between the two lakes, Land Between The Lakes became the largest inland peninsula in the United States. Downstream from this area, the courses of the two rivers diverge again, with the mouth of the Cumberland emptying into the Ohio River approximately 4 mi (7 km) from that of the Tennessee. Government first began to have a major impact on the area when the
    4.33
    3 votes
    208
    Bow Valley Provincial Park

    Bow Valley Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Bow Valley Provincial Park is a provincial park located in Alberta, Canada. Established in 1959 in the arch of Bow River, at the confluence with Kananaskis River, the park is one park of many within the Kananaskis Country park system. The park features setting for trout fishing in the Bow River and spectacular mountain scenery, being located immediately east of the Rocky Mountains in the Bow Valley. A much larger area, the Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park contains the 575 km Yamnuska Natural Area that protects the sub-alpine ecosystem present in the Canadian Rockies foothills, between the Kananaskis park system and the Banff National Park, which it borders to the west. The following activities are available in the park:
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge

    Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: IV: Habitat/Species Management Area
    • Governing Body: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    The Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge is a 4,218 acre (17.07 km²) National Wildlife Refuge located along the Tombigbee River near Coffeeville, Alabama. Named after the Choctaw tribe, it was established to provide a wood duck brood habitat and serve as a protected wintering area for waterfowl. Of the 4,218 acres (17.07 km²) of the refuge, approximately 1,802 acres (7.29 km²) of lakes, sloughs, and creeks, 2,265 acres (9.17 km²) of bottomland hardwoods, and 151 acres (0.61 km) of croplands and moist soil units. The facility has a four person staff with a $882,000 (FY 2005) annual budget. The refuge also manages an additional 236 acres (0.96 km) in perpetual conservation easements in eight parcels in Monroe, Sumter and Conecuh counties. Choctaw NWR was established in 1964 on lands acquired by the Corp of Engineers in conjunction with the Coffeeville Lock and Dam project. The 4,218 acre (17.07 km²) refuge encompasses approximately 1,802 acres (7.29 km²) of lakes, sloughs, and creeks, 2,265 acres (9.17 km²) of bottomland hardwoods, and 151 acres (0.61 km) of croplands and moist soil units. The refuge borders the Tombigbee River (and the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway) for 6.5 miles
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge

    Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge, a part of the United States National Wildlife Refuge System, is located on Jupiter Island in Florida. Part of the refuge is inside the town of Jupiter Island, while the rest is in the unincorporated areas of Martin County. The 1,035-acre (4.19 km) refuge was established in 1969, to protect the Loggerhead and Green Sea Turtles. It is administered as part of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Within the refuge is the 173-acre (0.70 km) Reed Wilderness Seashore Sanctuary, designated a National Natural Landmark on November 1967. The Hobe Sound Nature Center is a private non-profit nature center that cooperates with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to conduct environmental education and awareness programs about the Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. The Center was founded in 1973 by and continues to receive major support from the Jupiter Island Garden Club.
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness

    Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Bureau of Land Management
    The Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness is a 112,500 acres (455 km) wilderness area located in northern Arizona and southern Utah, USA, within the arid Colorado Plateau region. The wilderness is composed of broad plateaus, tall escarpments, and deep canyons. The Paria River flows through the wilderness before joining the Colorado River at Lee's Ferry, Arizona. The U.S. Congress designated the wilderness area in 1984 and it was largely incorporated into the new Vermilion Cliffs National Monument proclaimed in 2000 by executive order of President Bill Clinton. Both the wilderness area and the National Monument are administered by the federal Bureau of Land Management. The Colorado Plateau and its river basins are of immense value in the Earth sciences, specifically chronostratigraphy, as the region contains multiple terrain features exposing miles-thick contiguous rock columns geologists and paleobiologists use as reference strata of the geologic record. Ancient petroglyphs, granaries, and campsites indicate that ancestral Puebloan people utilized the Wilderness between AD 200 and AD 1200. They hunted mule deer and bighorn sheep and grew corn, beans, and squash in the lower end
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Waterton Lakes National Park

    Waterton Lakes National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: Parks Canada
    Waterton Lakes National Park is a national park located in the southwest corner of Alberta, Canada, and borders Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. Waterton was Canada's fourth national park, formed in 1895 and named after Waterton Lake, in turn after the Victorian naturalist and conservationist Charles Waterton. The park contains 505 km (195 sq mi) of rugged mountains and wilderness. Operated by Parks Canada, Waterton is open all year, but the main tourist season is during July and August. The only commercial facilities available within the park are located at the Waterton Park townsite. The park ranges in elevation from 1,290 metres (4,232 ft) at the townsite to 2,910 m (9,547 ft) at Mount Blakiston. It offers many scenic trails, including Crypt Lake trail. In 2004, Waterton Lakes National Park had 367,500 visitors. The park was the subject of a short film in 2011's National Parks Project, directed by Peter Lynch and scored by Cadence Weapon, Laura Barrett and Mark Hamilton. In 1932, Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park was formed from Waterton and Glacier. It was dedicated to world peace by Sir Charles Arthur Mander on behalf of Rotary International. Although the park
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Chapada Diamantina National Park

    Chapada Diamantina National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    The Chapada Diamantina National Park (Parque Nacional da Chapada Diamantina in Portuguese) is a 1,520 km² national park in the Chapada Diamantina region of the State of Bahia, Northeast Brazil. The park is located between 41º35’-41º15’W and 12º25’-13º20’S; about 400 kilometres inland from Salvador, the capital city of Bahia. Chapada is a Brazilian word that means a region of steep cliffs, usually at the edge of a plateau. Diamantina refers to the diamonds found there in the mid-19th century. The park was created in the 1980s in response to growing ecotourism. The region is semi-arid, however it has no shortage of water, from the many rivers and streams. On average, the altitude of the park is between 800 and 1000 metres above sea level, although parts are as high as 2000 metres above. In this place is located the highest point of state in Pico do Barbado with 2,036 meters. The park is typified by hills, mountains, valleys and monoliths, with few plains. Weekly flights by TRIP Linhas Aéreas links Horácio de Mattos Airport, the gateway of Chapada Diamantina, with Salvador da Bahia, the capital of the state. There are buses leaving the Salvador Bus Station daily. Many cave systems
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Poe Paddy State Park

    Poe Paddy State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Poe Paddy State Park is a 23-acre (9.3 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Haines Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The park is surrounded by Bald Eagle State Forest. Poe Valley State Park is 4 miles (6.4 km) to the east. The park is at the confluence of Big Poe Creek and Penns Creek. Poe Paddy State Park is named for the two mountains that surround it. Poe Mountain lies to the east and Paddy Mountain lies to the west, with Penns Creek in the valley between them. Poe Paddy State Park is on the site of the former lumber town of Poe Mills. Poe Mills was part of the lumber boom that swept through the wooded mountains of Pennsylvania from the mid-to-late 19th and early 20th centuries. At its peak, Poe Mills had a population of over 300. Big Poe Creek was dammed to provide power for the mills and a railroad was built into the area to transport lumber. This railway became a scenic route connecting the area with Milroy. Poe Valley State Park and Poe Paddy State Park were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The young men of the CCC also worked to clear the regrowing forests of brush to prevent forest fires. They
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Ralph Stover State Park

    Ralph Stover State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Ralph Stover State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 45 acres (18 ha) in Plumstead and Tinicum Townships, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is a very popular destination for whitewater kayaking on Tohickon Creek and rock climbing on High Rocks (Triassic sandstone of the Newark Group). Ralph Stover State Park is two miles (3.2 km) north of Point Pleasant near Pennsylvania Route 32. Tohickon Creek was named by the Lenape some of the first inhabitants of the area. "To-Hick-Hanne" means "Deer-Bone-Creek". Ralph Stover State Park was the site of an 18th century gristmill that was built on Tohickon Creek by the park's namesake, Ralph Stover. Remnants of the mill and mill race can still be seen near Tohickon Creek. The Stover family gave their land to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1931. The recreational facilities were built during the Great Depression by the Federal Works Progress Administration created by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to provide work for the unemployed. Author James A. Michener donated the High Rocks area to the park in 1956. Although "High Rocks State Park" is listed in the United States Geological Survey Geographic Names Information
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Adams Memorial

    Adams Memorial

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Adams Memorial is a proposed United States presidential memorial to honor the 2nd President John Adams, his wife and prolific writer, Abigail Adams, their son, the 6th President, John Quincy Adams, and his wife, Louisa Catherine Adams and other members of the Adams family, including John Q. and Louisa's son Charles Francis Adams, Sr., civil war diplomat, politician, and editor; and his sons Henry Adams (noted historian, autobiographer) and Brooks Adams (academic). On November 5, 2001, the United States Congress created the Adams Memorial Foundation under Pub.L. 107-62. The foundation is authorized to construct a memorial on federal land in Washington, D.C., at no expense to the government. Once established the memorial would presumably fall under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Andersonville prison

    Andersonville prison

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Andersonville National Historic Site, located near Andersonville, Georgia, preserves the former Camp Sumter (also known as Andersonville Prison), a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the American Civil War. Most of the site lies in southwestern Macon County, adjacent to the east side of the town of Andersonville. As well as the former prison, the site also contains the Andersonville National Cemetery and the National Prisoner of War Museum. Of the approximately 45,000 Union prisoners held at Camp Sumter during the war, 12,913 died due to starvation, malnutrition, diarrhea, disease, abuse and blunt weapon executions from guards. The prison, which opened in February 1864, originally covered about 16.5 acres (67,000 m) of land enclosed by a 15-foot (4.6 m) high stockade. In June 1864 it was enlarged to 26.5 acres (107,000 m). The stockade was in the shape of a rectangle 1,620 feet (490 m) by 779 feet (237 m). There were two entrances on the west side of the stockade, known as "north entrance" and "south entrance". A prisoner described his entry into the prison camp: "As we entered the place, a spectacle met our eyes that almost froze our blood with horror, and made our hearts
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Awash National Park

    Awash National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Awash National Park is one of the National Parks of Ethiopia. Located at the southern tip of the Afar Region, this park is 225 kilometers east of Addis Ababa (and a few kilometers west of Awash), with its southern boundary along the Awash River, and covers at least 756 square kilometers of acacia woodland and grassland. The Addis Ababa - Dire Dawa highway passes through this park, separating the Illala Saha Plains to the south from the Kudu Valley to the north. In the south of the park the Awash River gorge has amazing waterfalls. In the upper Kudu Valley at Filwoha are hot springs amid groves of palm trees. The Awash National Park was established in 1966, although the act authorizing its existence was not completely passed for another three years. Wildlife in this park include the East African Oryx, Soemmerring's Gazelle, Dik-dik, the lesser and greater Kudus, and Warthogs. Anubis baboons and Hamadryas baboons are present, as well as over 350 species of native birds. Previously there were packs of the African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus, but this species may now be locally extirpated.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Ekenäs Archipelago National Park

    Ekenäs Archipelago National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Ekenäs Archipelago National Park (Swedish: Ekenäs skärgårds nationalpark, Finnish: Tammisaaren saariston kansallispuisto) is situated in the Ekenäs archipelago, in the Uusimaa region of Finland. It was established in 1989 and covers 52 square kilometres (20 sq mi). The park is maintained by Metsähallitus (Ministry of Forestry). Most of the park's area is composed of rock islets near the open sea, and the water areas surrounding them. Landing on and using motorboats near the most important bird islands is forbidden from April 1 to July 17, to protect the nesting of aquatic birds. The park can only be accessed by boat. Visitors without a boat can reach it by a water taxi. Ekenäs Archipelago National Park received the European Diploma of Protected Areas on June 19, 1996. It is valid until June 2011.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve constitutes two official park units jointly managed by the National Park Service in the Alaska panhandle west of Juneau. President Calvin Coolidge first proclaimed the area around Glacier Bay a national monument under the Antiquities Act on February 25, 1925. Subsequent to an expansion of the monument by President Jimmy Carter in 1978, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) enlarged the national monument by 523,000 acres (2116.5 km²) on December 2, 1980 and in the process created Glacier Bay National Park. Similarly ANILCA set aside 57,000 additional acres (230.7 km²) of public land for Glacier Bay National Preserve located to the immediate northwest of the park in order to protect a portion of the Alsek River and related fish and wildlife habitats. Glacier Bay became part of a binational UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979, was inscribed as a Biosphere Reserve in 1986 and in 1994 undertook an obligation to work with Hoonah and Tlingit Native American organizations in the management of the protected area. In total the park and preserve cover 5,130 square miles (13,287 km²). Most of Glacier Bay is designated wilderness area
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Gonarezhou National Park

    Gonarezhou National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Gonarezhou National Park is a National Park located in south-eastern Zimbabwe. It is situated in a relatively remote corner of Masvingo Province, south of Chimanimani along the Mozambique border. Owing to its vast size, rugged terrain and its location away from main tourist routes, large tracts of Gonarezhou remain as pristine wilderness. At 5,053 km² Gonarezhou is the country’s second largest game reserve after Hwange National Park. Gonarezhou is a Shona name meaning "elephant's tusk." It forms part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, a peace park that links Gonarezhou with the Kruger National Park in South Africa and the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique. Animals can move freely between the three sanctuaries. The Gonarezhou National Park was formed in 1975, by uniting former hunting areas and tsetse fly control corridors. The park was closed to the public during the Rhodesian War and again during much of the Mozambique civil war but was re-opened in 1994. The Park is part of the international Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. The park is a lowveld region of baobabs, scrublands and sandstone cliffs. Historically the Park has been a habitat for the endangered African Wild
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Los Katíos National Park

    Los Katíos National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Los Katíos National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional de Los Katíos) is a national park located in northwest Colombia which covers 278 square miles (around 720 km², or 72,000 hectares). It is a part of the Darién Gap, shared by Panama and Colombia and is contiguous to Darién National Park in Panama. The Pan-American Highway when completed as proposed will pass near or through Los Katíos National Park. The park was declared a World Heritage Site in 1994 due to the extraordinary diversity of plant and animal species represented. The park contains over 25% of the bird species reported for Colombia in an area less than 1% of the total Colombian territory.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Pasayten Wilderness

    Pasayten Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Pasayten Wilderness is a 2145 km². protected area located within Okanogan National Forest and Mount Baker National Forest in Washington State, centered on the Three Forks (48°54′02″N 120°38′01″W / 48.900584°N 120.6336808°W / 48.900584; -120.6336808) of the Pasayten River, a tributary of the Similkameen River. The northern boundary of the wilderness is the Canadian border. Across the border are Manning Provincial Park and Cathedral Provincial Park. The wilderness area is adjacent to the Ross Lake National Recreation Area to the west, and North Cascades National Park beyond that. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail has its northernmost section in this wilderness. The western part of the wilderness features dramatic views of the northern Washington Cascade Mountains while the eastern section is known for its grasslands and tundra. The Pasayten is traditional hunting territory of the Nlaka'pamux peoples of the Fraser Canyon and Nicola Country along with adjoining parts of the Cascade Range, although there are no Nlaka'pamux populations on the Washington side of the border.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Barra del Colorado Wildlife Refuge

    Barra del Colorado Wildlife Refuge

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Barra del Colorado Wildlife Refuge is a Wildlife refuge, part of the Tortuguero Conservation Area, in Limón Province in the northeastern part of Costa Rica. It is the second largest rain forest preserve in the country and protects areas that contain hot humid forests, mangroves, canals and marine areas, bounded in part by the San Juan and Colorado rivers, and to the south the Tortuguero National Park. The area protected has a hot and humid climate with no dry season, and is the habitat of the endangered West Indian Manatee as well as many caymans, crocodiles, and fish. It is also home to a variety of tapirs, jaguars, cougars, monkeys, ocelots, and other mammals. Birds found includes osprey, toucans, cormorants, herons, hawks, and many more. The village of Tortuguero from which the neighbouring Tortuguero National Park got its name is located on the southern border the refuge, and contains two research stations.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Blå Jungfrun

    Blå Jungfrun

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Blå Jungfrun, or "Blåkulla", is a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. More precisely, it is situated in Kalmar Strait, between the provinces Småland and Öland. Administratively, it belongs to the municipality Oskarshamn. It is uninhabited and has an area of only about 0.7 km², though it rises 86 metres above sea level. Since 1926, it is one of the national parks of Sweden. As a national park, there are important limitations to the Everyman's right at Blå Jungfrun. For example, you are not allowed to make up a fire or spend the night on the island. The island consists partly of bare rock, partly of dense hardwood forest. The black guillemot is a characteristic bird. There are several caves and an ancient stone labyrinth. The island plays an important role in Swedish folklore, where it is viewed as an evil and magical place. The name Blå Jungfrun (Blue Virgin) was originally used by sailors to avoid provoking the evil spirits who dwelt on the island. According to a widespread belief, related already by Olaus Magnus in 1555, witches meet there each Maundy Thursday. Carolus Linnaeus, who visited the island in 1741, was sceptical: According to a still living tradition, anyone who removes
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Mount Hood Wilderness

    Mount Hood Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Mount Hood Wilderness is a protected wilderness area inside the Mount Hood National Forest which is located in the U.S. state of Oregon. The area, covering 67,320 acres (27,240 ha), includes the peak of Mount Hood and its upper slopes, and ranges from temperate rain forests at the lower elevations, to glaciers and rocky ridges at higher elevations. The wilderness wraps around the mountain from west to northeast, and borders Timberline Lodge and Mount Hood Meadows ski lifts on some of the south and east slopes of the mountain. Journeys to the summit are popular, but are certainly not for everyone. Mount Hood offers experienced and novice mountaineers opportunities to traverse glaciers, snowfields, steep volcanic soil, and deal with rapidly changing and difficult to predict weather. More than 10,000 climbers annually make the attempt, making Mount Hood's summit the most visited snowclad peak in America. Numerous trails circle the mountain, from Lolo Pass on the northwest (which the Pacific Crest Trail crosses) to Cloud Cap on the northeast to the ski areas on the south. There are several historic structures (predating the wilderness designation), one of which is the remains of a
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Tongariro National Park

    Tongariro National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Tongariro National Park is the oldest national park in New Zealand, located in the central North Island. It has been acknowledged by UNESCO as one of the 28 mixed cultural and natural World Heritage Sites. Tongariro National Park was the fourth national park established in the world. The active volcanic mountains Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe, and Tongariro are located in the centre of the park. There are a number of Māori religious sites within the park and the summits of Tongariro, including Ngauruhoe and Ruapehu, are tapu (sacred). The park includes many towns around its boundary including Ohakune, Waiouru, Horopito, Pokaka, Erua, National Park Village, Whakapapa skifield and Turangi. Tongariro National Park covers approximately 795.98 km² stretching between 175° 22' and 175° 48' East and 38° 58' and 39° 25' South in the heart of the North Island of New Zealand. It is just a few kilometres west-southwest of Lake Taupo. It is 330 km south of Auckland by road, and 320 km north of Wellington. It contains a considerable part of the North Island Volcanic Plateau. Directly to the east stand the hills of the Kaimanawa range. The Whanganui River rises within the park and flows through Whanganui
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Anhinga Trail

    Anhinga Trail

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    The Anhinga Trail is a short trail (about 0.4 miles) in the Everglades National Park. Located 4 miles from the park entrance, it starts at the Royal Palm Visitor Center. The trail is a paved walkway and a boardwalk over Taylor Slough, a freshwater sawgrass marsh. Abundant wildlife is visible from the trail, including alligators, turtles, anhingas, herons, and egrets. it is one of the most popular trails in the Park. On November 5, 1996, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In 2003, tourists witnessed a fight between an alligator and a Burmese python which went on for 24 hours, until a larger alligator joined the fight and the snake escaped. Video and news coverage of the fight was widespread and brought attention to the spread of the python, an invasive species, in the Everglades.
    0.00
    0 votes
    229
    Big Knife Provincial Park

    Big Knife Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: VI: Managed Resource Protected Area
    • Governing Body:
    Big Knife Provincial Park is a small provincial park in central Alberta, Canada. It was established in 1962 on the Battle River, at the confluence with the Big Knife Creek and is located between the villages of Donalda and Forestburg, 10 km south of highway 53, 88 km from the city of Camrose. Many activities in the park are water related and include canoeing, kayaking, swimming, fishing and power boating. Birdwatching and camping at the Big Knife Campground are also popular. The park is open during the summer (from May to September), with only limited access during the winter months.
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site

    Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site commemorates the Battle of Brice's Crossroads, in which the Confederate army, under Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest, defeated a much larger Union force on June 10, 1864, to ultimately secure supply lines between Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee. The site, in extreme northern Lee County, preserves only one acre of the much larger historic battlefield (which extended northward into southwestern Prentiss County). This is the spot where the Brice family house once stood. It is located about 6 miles (10 km) west of Baldwyn, Mississippi, on Mississippi Highway 370. The site features a memorial erected soon after the battlefield was designated as a historic site in 1929. In addition, on June 11, 2005, a second memorial was dedicated to Confederate Capt. John W. Morton, Chief of Artillery, and his battery. Brices Cross Roads is the only National Battlefield Site in the United States National Park System. The modern Bethany Presbyterian Church is located on the southeast side of the crossroads. At the time of the battle, this congregation's meeting house was located further south along the Baldwyn Road. The Bethany Cemetery, adjacent to
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    Bucktail State Park

    Bucktail State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: III: Natural Monument
    • Governing Body:
    Bucktail State Park Natural Area is a 16,433-acre (6,650 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Cameron and Clinton Counties in Pennsylvania in the United States. The park follows Pennsylvania Route 120 for 75 miles (121 km) between Emporium (in Cameron County, which contains 3,239 acres (1,311 ha) of the park) and Lock Haven (in Clinton County, which contains the other 11,800 acres (4,800 ha)). Bucktail State Park Natural Area park runs along Sinnemahoning Creek and the West Branch Susquehanna River and also passes through Renovo (in Clinton County). The park is named for the Civil War Pennsylvania Bucktail Regiment and is primarily dedicated to wildlife viewing, especially elk. The course of Bucktail State Park Natural Area is as follows: leaving the city of Lock Haven, Pennsylvania Route 120 and the West Branch Susquehanna River pass through the following municipalities in Clinton County heading west (in order): Allison, Woodward, Bald Eagle, Colebrook, Grugan, and Chapman townships, the boroughs of Renovo and South Renovo, and Noyes Township. Next Pennsylvania 120 leaves the West Branch Susquehanna River and follows Sinnemahoning Creek west through East Keating Township, then crosses
    0.00
    0 votes
    232
    Canaveral National Seashore

    Canaveral National Seashore

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Canaveral National Seashore is a National Seashore located between New Smyrna Beach and Titusville, Florida, in Volusia County and Brevard County, United States. The park, located on a barrier island, is home to more than 1,000 plant species and 310 bird species. CANA occupies 58,000 acres (230 km²) (including lagoons) and was created on January 3, 1975 by an act of Congress. The park's 24-mile-long beach is the longest undeveloped beach on the east coast of the state. The southern part is also known as Playalinda Beach, the middle section as Klondike Beach, and the northern section as Apollo Beach. The John F. Kennedy Space Center is located at the southern end of the barrier island occupied by Canaveral National Seashore, so access to the seashore is often restricted during launch-related activities at the space center. Mosquito Lagoon borders the other side of the Cape from the Seashore. The Playalinda Beach has thirteen parking lots numbered from the south. The space shuttle launch facility is easily visible from the approach to Parking Lot #1. Canaveral National Seashore has concurrent jurisdiction with both the state of Florida and its counties of Volusia and Brevard.
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Cape Scott Provincial Park

    Cape Scott Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Cape Scott Provincial Park is a provincial park located at the cape of the same name, which is the northwestern tip of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. First established in 1973 with c.37,200 acres (151 km) of area, later boundary revisions form an area of 22,290 hectares (223 km). Lanz and Cox Islands Provincial Park, formerly Scott Islands Marine Provincial Park, is offshore, to the northwest of Cape Scott. Cape Scott, which has had a lighthouse since 1960 and is the northwestern extremity of Vancouver Island, is located at 50°47′00″N 128°26′00″W / 50.7833333°N 128.4333333°W / 50.7833333; -128.4333333, is outside the provincial park and is on Department of National Defence property. The park is known for its old growth forest and sandy beaches. The terrain is rugged and the area is known for its heavy rain and violent storms. The park's highest point is Mt. St. Patrick, 422 meters above sea level. The park's largest lake is Eric Lake, at 44 hectares. Most of the park is in the Nahwitti Lowland, a subunit of the Hecate Depression, part of the Coastal Trough. The former settlement of Cape Scott, which was founded by Danish-Canadian immigrants, is located within the
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Cutervo National Park

    Cutervo National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Cutervo National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional de Cutervo) is the oldest National Park in Peru. It was established September 8, 1961 by means of Law N° 13694 by the Peruvian Government as the first protected natural area created. Its creator was Salomon Vilchez Murga (1907-1993), a recognized Biologist who was born in Cutervo, Peru. When created, the park included a total of 2,500 hectares (9.7 sq mi), which has been expanded to 8,214 hectares (31.71 sq mi). The park is located in the San Andrés de Cutervo District, Cutervo Province, Cajamarca. It protects part of the Peruvian Yungas ecoregion. There are lots of caves in this park including San Andres Cave, where the guacharo lives - a bird in danger of extinction. The principal objective is the protection of the flora and fauna and as well as the conservation of the beautiful scenic locations of the cordillera de los Tarros. Its main attraction is the Cueva del Guácharo, a one-hour walk from the locality of San Andrés. In the cave is a colony of guacharo, nocturnal birds that feed exclusively on fruit and nuts. There is also a stream which flows under this cave, containing a species of catfish (Astroblepus rosei). The park
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve

    Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve is a unit of the National Park Service near Coupeville, Washington. The Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve, a rural historic district, preserves and protects an unbroken historical record of Puget Sound exploration and settlement from the 19th century to the present. Historic farms, still under cultivation in the prairies of Whidbey Island, reveal land use patterns unchanged since settlers claimed the land in the 1850s under the Donation Land Claim Act. The Victorian seaport community of Coupeville, one of the oldest towns in Washington is in the reserve. Also included are two state parks: Fort Casey and Fort Ebey. The Central Whidbey Island Historic District, on the National Register of Historic Places and with the Sergeant Clark House, is also part of the reserve. Ebey's Landing provides a vivid historical record of Pacific Northwest history, including the first exploration of Puget Sound by Captain George Vancouver in 1792; early settlement by Colonel Isaac Ebey, an important figure in Washington Territory; growth and settlement resulting from the Oregon Trail and the Westward migration; the Donation Land Laws (1850–1855); and
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Goodwood Plantation

    Goodwood Plantation

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Goodwood Plantation (also known as Old Croom Mansion) was a medium sized cotton plantation of about 1,675 acres (7 km) in central Leon County, Florida, established by Hardy Bryan Croom. It is located at 1500 Miccosukee Road. The plantation was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on June 30, 1972. The plantation home is now a historic house museum known as Goodwood Museum & Gardens that features original family furniture, porcelain, textiles, glassware, art and personal effects. The rooms have been decorated to appear in the years surrounding World War I. The house is visited by guided tour. The grounds cover 16 acres (65,000 m), and the gardens also feature an early 20th century design. Admission to the gardens is free. The Leon County Florida 1860 Agricultural Census shows that Goodwood Plantation had the following: The Croom family of Lenoir County, North Carolina began purchasing land in North Florida in the 1820s, including plantations in Mariana, Quincy and Tallahassee. Hardy Bryan Croom, a planter and recognized naturalist, discovered the rare Torreya tree. He began amassing the land for Goodwood, purchasing about 640 acres (2.6 km) of the Lafayette Land
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    237
    Henry M. Jackson Wilderness

    Henry M. Jackson Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Henry M. Jackson Wilderness is a U.S. Wilderness Area in the state of Washington, United States. The Henry M. Jackson Wilderness was created by the 1984 Washington Wilderness Act and named after former US Senator Henry M. Jackson of Washington . Senator Henry Jackson was instrumental in the designation of many of the state's Wildernesses, and this "forest" of fabled peaks recalls his efforts. Cross-Cascade Indian trails paralleled the Little Wenatchee River and provided routes for later exploring parties such as the 1860 E.F. Cady party for whom Cady Pass and Cady Creek were named. The Henry M. Jackson Wilderness is adjacent to the southwest corner of the Glacier Peak Wilderness. This 102,673 acre (415.5 km²) area is northwest of Stevens Pass on United States Highway 2 and northeast of the town of Skykomish, Washington. While this Wilderness straddles the Cascade Mountain Range, most of it is in the Westside ecotype. The Wilderness lies in parts of Snoqualmie, Mount Baker, and Wenatchee National Forests. Wild Sky Wilderness is located immediately southwest of the Henry M. Jackson Wilderness. The terrain is rugged, with steep slopes, and finger ridges dissected by small
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    238
    Minami Alps National Park

    Minami Alps National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Minami Alps National Park (南アルプス国立公園, Minami Arupusu Kokuritsu Kōen) is a national park in the Chūbu region, Honshū, Japan. The Minami Alps National Park was established on June 1, 1964. It extends along the border of Shizuoka, Yamanashi and Nagano Prefectures for a length of 55 kilometres (34 mi), and a maximum width of 18 kilometres (11 mi) for a total area of 358 square kilometres (138 sq mi). The Park is a very mountainous region, centering on the Akaishi Mountains with several noted peaks of over 3000 meters in height, including Komagatake, Senjō-ga-take, Akaishi-dake and Kita-dake. The park also protects the headwaters of the Fuji River, Ōi River and Tenryū River. Flora in the park includes extensive stands of Japanese beech, Japanese stone pine and hemlock spruce. The largest fauna is the kamoshika and noted avian species include the ptarmigan. The park has minimal public facilities, and the only approach is by mountaineering. Other large fauna include Asiatic Black Bear, Wild Boar and Sika Deer.
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    239
    Nanda Devi National Park

    Nanda Devi National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: Strict nature reserve
    • Governing Body:
    The Nanda Devi National Park is a national park situated around the peak of Nanda Devi, 7,817 m (25,646 ft) in the state of Uttarakhand in northern India that was established in 1982. Along with the adjoining Valley of Flowers National Park to the northwest, it was inscribed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988. Nanda Devi National Park covers an area of 630.33 km (243.37 sq mi) and together with Valley of Flowers National Park is encompassed in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve totaling a protected area of 2,236.74 km (863.61 sq mi), which is surrounded by a buffer zone of 5,148.57 km (1,987.87 sq mi). This Reserve is part of the UNESCO World Network of Biosphere Reserves since 2004. The park encompasses the Nanda Devi Sanctuary, a glacial basin surrounded by a ring of peaks between 6,000 metres (19,700 ft) and 7,500 m (24,600 ft) high, and drained by the Rishi Ganga through the Rishi Ganga Gorge, a steep, almost impassable defile. The entire park lies at an elevation of more than 3,500 m (11,500 ft) above mean sea level. The Sanctuary can be divided into two parts, Inner and Outer. Together, they are surrounded by the main Sanctuary Wall, which forms a roughly square outline,
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    240
    Pachaug State Forest

    Pachaug State Forest

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Pachaug State Forest is the largest forest in the Connecticut state forest system, encompassing over 27,000 acres (110 km²) of land. It is located on the Rhode Island border in New London County, and parcels of the forest lie in the towns of Voluntown, Griswold, Plainfield, Sterling, North Stonington, and Preston. The forest was founded in 1928, but most of the land came from purchases made later during the Great Depression. The Pachaug-Great Meadow Swamp portion of the park was declared a National Natural Landmark in May 1973. The forest is part of the Northeastern coastal forests ecoregion. The forest is named after the Pachaug River, which runs through the center of the forest. The Great Meadow section of the park is a National Natural Landmark due to its Atlantic white cedar swamp. This type of forest is at risk of being succeeded by hemlock. There are four popular hiking trails, maintained by the Connecticut Forest and Park Association, that run through Pachaug State Forest. The Pachaug Trail runs about 30 miles (48 km) in an east-west route that follows a horse-shoe curve north. It begins at the northern end of Pachaug Pond and ends at Green Fall Pond. The Nehantic Trail is a
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    241
    Paparoa National Park

    Paparoa National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Paparoa National Park is on the west coast of the South Island of New Zealand. It was established in 1987 and encompasses 306 km². The park ranges from on or near the coastline to the peak of the Paparoa Ranges. A separate section of the park is to the north and is centered at Ananui Creek. The park protects a limestone karst area. The park contains several caves, one of which is a commercial tourist attraction. The majority of the park is forested with a wide variety of vegetation. The park was the site of the 1995 Cave Creek disaster where fourteen people died as a result of the collapse of a scenic viewing platform. The small settlement of Punakaiki, adjacent to the popular Pancake Rocks tourist attraction, lies on the edge of the park. In 1976, the Federated Mountain Clubs had identified the northern part of the Paparoa Ranges as a potential wilderness area. In 1979, the Native Forest Action Council proposed a 130,000 hectare national park, including the northern Paparoa Ranges and land to the north and east. This eventually led to the National Parks and Reserves Authority identifying the western Paparoa Range as a prospective national park. Meanwhile, a joint proposal by the
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    242
    Popo Agie Wilderness

    Popo Agie Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    Popo Agie Wilderness ( /poʊˈpoʊʒə/) is located within Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming, United States. The wilderness consists of 101,870 acres (412 km) on the east side of the continental divide in the Wind River Range. Originally set aside as a primitive area in 1932, in 1984 the Wyoming Wilderness Act was passed securing a more permanent protection status for the wilderness. The wilderness is a part of the 20 million acre (81,000 km) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with proper permit, no roads or buildings are constructed and there is also no logging or mining, in compliance with the 1964 Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas within National Forests and Bureau of Land Management areas also allow hunting in season. The Popo Agie Wilderness is a primarily sub-alpine and alpine region with the minimum elevation being 8,400 feet (2,600 m). Twenty mountains exceed 12,000 feet (3,660 m) with the highest being Wind River Peak at 13,192 feet (4,021 m). Perhaps the most visited area within the wilderness and the entire Wind River Range is the Cirque of the Towers
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    243
    Ruby Mountains Wilderness

    Ruby Mountains Wilderness

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Ruby Mountains Wilderness is a protected wilderness area in the Ruby Mountains of Elko County, in the northeast section of the state of Nevada in the western United States. It covers an area of approximately 90,000 acres (364 km), and is administered by the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.
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    244
    Sawtooth National Recreation Area

    Sawtooth National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: United States Forest Service
    The Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA) is a National Recreation Area located in central Idaho, within the Boise, Challis, and Sawtooth National Forests. The recreation area was established in 1972, is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and includes the Sawtooth Wilderness. Activities within the roughly 778,000-acre (3,150 km) recreation area include hiking, backpacking, White water rafting, camping, rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, fishing, and hunting. The SNRA headquarters are about seven miles (11 km) north of Ketchum on Highway 75, and the SNRA also has a ranger station in Stanley, near its northern boundary. Much of the SNRA was heavily glaciated, especially in the Sawtooth Mountains where remnants of these glaciers exist as glacial lakes, moraines, hanging valleys, cirques, and arêtes. The Sawtooth Fault stretches 40 mi (64 km) long, and runs through the Sawtooth Valley, while the two past large earthquakes likely took place on the fault around 7,000 and 4,000 years b.p. Idaho's most famous mountain range, the Sawtooth Mountains are located within the SNRA, along with the White Cloud, Boulder, and Smoky mountains. The highest point in the SNRA is Castle Peak
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    245
    South Higgins Lake State Park

    South Higgins Lake State Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    South Higgins Lake State Park is a 1,000-acre (4.0 km) state park in Roscommon County, Michigan. The park opened in 1927 with 15 campsites and has since been expanded to 400 campsites, one of the largest in the state park system. The park has one mile of Higgins Lake shoreline and surrounds Marl Lake. County Road 104 runs through the park. Most park development is in the 300 acre section between Higgins Lake and CR 104. The 700 acre Marl Lake section is less developed and has 5.5 miles of hiking trails. The park has a mixed pine, oak, maple forest. Hunting is allowed in portions of the park. Bird species include nesting bald eagles, migratory loons, kingfisher and turkey.
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    246
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    247
    Strathcona Provincial Park

    Strathcona Provincial Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category:
    • Governing Body:
    Strathcona Provincial Park is the oldest provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, and the largest on Vancouver Island. Founded in 1911, the park was named for Donald Alexander Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, a wealthy philanthropist and railroad pioneer. It lies within the Strathcona Regional District. The Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, established in 2000, includes three watersheds in the western area of the park. The park is 9 km east of Gold River and 25 km west of Campbell River. At 2,458 square kilometres, it contains a group of mountains called the Elk River Mountains. It contains the highest peaks of the Vancouver Island Ranges. Some notable mountains located within the park boundaries include: For others, see the List of mountains in Strathcona Provincial Park. Strathcona Park is also known for its lakes, waterfalls, and glaciers. Buttle Lake is a popular destination for swimming, canoeing, kayaking, and fishing. Also located in the park is Della Falls which, at 440 m in height, is widely considered the highest waterfall in Canada. The 6,500 meter thick Karmutsen Formation is the most abundant rock unit in the park. It is a pile of tholeiitic
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    248
    Taman Negara National Park

    Taman Negara National Park

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: National park
    • Governing Body:
    Taman Negara was established at the Titiwangsa Mountains, Malaysia, in 1938/1939 as the King George V National Park. It was renamed to Taman Negara after independence, which literally means "national park" in Malay. Taman Negara has a total area of 4,343 km² and has a reputation as the world's oldest tropical rainforest. Taman Negara encompasses three states, Pahang, Kelantan and Terengganu, each with its own legislation. The Taman Negara Enactment (Pahang) No. 2 of 1939 is enforced in the state of Pahang, the Taman Negara Enactment (Kelantan) No. 14 of 1938 in the state of Kelantan and the Taman Negara Enactment (Terengganu) No. 6 of 1939 in the state of Terengganu. The enactments have similar contents. Taman Negara Pahang is the largest at 2,477 km², followed by Taman Negara Kelantan at 1,043 km² and Taman Negara Terengganu at 853 km². The park has been developed into a famous ecotourism destination in Malaysia. There are several geological and biological attractions in the park. Gunung Tahan is the highest point of the Malay Peninsula; climbers can use Kuala Tahan or Merapoh as their departure point. Taman Negara is the home of some rare mammals, such as the Malayan Tiger,
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    249
    Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area

    Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body: U.S. National Park Service
    The Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area in northern California. It has a total of 203,587 acres (82,389 ha) of land, which is divided into three units, Whiskeytown, Shasta and Trinity. The recreation area was established in 1965 by the United States Congress. The National Park Service manages the Whiskeytown unit. The Shasta-Trinity National Forest surrounds the Shasta and Trinity units, so they are managed by the United States Forest Service. Recreational activities available include camping, fishing, swimming, boating and hiking. There are only 18 National Recreation Areas under U.S. Forest Service management designated in the United States, and the Shasta-Trinity units are somewhat unique because they are made up of 4 lakes with very distinct recreation opportunities. Of the 246,087 acres (99,588 ha) that make up the Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity Unit, 203,587 acres (82,389 ha) are managed by the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The Forest Service manages Shasta, Trinity and Lewiston Lakes. The Trinity area with its four subunits: Lewiston Lake, Trinity Dam, Stuart Fork and North Lake areas have many opportunities for
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    250
    Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins State Historic Site

    Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins State Historic Site

    • System:
    • IUCN Category: V: Protected Landscape/Seascape
    • Governing Body:
    Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins Historic State Park is a Florida State Park located in Homosassa, off U.S. 19. It contains the ruins of a sugar plantation owned by David Levy Yulee. Yulee was a delegate of the Territorial Legislative Council. After Florida became a state, he was elected by the legislature in 1845 to the US Senate, becoming the first Jewish American to serve there. After Florida seceded from the Union, Yulee served in the Confederate Congress. He is credited with having developed a network of railroads that tremendously boosted the state's economy. At Homassa, Yulee established a sugar cane plantation, which was destroyed during the American Civil War. The original plantation covered more than 5,000 acres (20 km²), and was worked by approximately 1,000 enslaved African Americans. They raised sugar cane, citrus, and cotton. The large mill (which was steam-driven) ran from 1851 to 1864. It produced sugar, syrup and molasses, the latter used in making rum. At the park, the stonework (foundation, well and 40-foot chimney) of the mill, iron gears, a cane press, and some of the other machinery remain. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 12,
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