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Best Railway terminus of All Time

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    1
    Ngaio Railway Station

    Ngaio Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Ngaio Railway Station is one of eight railway stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island, and serves the suburb of Ngaio. The station was erected and operated by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR) on their line from Wellington to Longburn. The area served by this station used to be called Crofton, until the suburb was renamed to Ngaio in 1908. From the acquisition of the WMR by the New Zealand Railways Department in 1908 until the opening of the Tawa Flat deviation in 1937, the station was on the North Island Main Trunk Railway. DM class Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). Ngaio was one of three stations constructed by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company on what is now known as the Johnsonville Branch. It was opened on 21 September 1885 along with the first section of the company’s line between Wellington and Paramata. Timetabled services began several days later on the 24th. The station originally only had a single side platform, with the
    7.50
    8 votes
    2
    Mangaroa Railway Station

    Mangaroa Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Mangaroa railway station was a single-platform rural railway station on the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and Featherston in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island, on the section that was replaced by the Rimutaka Deviation in 1955. It served the small rural settlement of Mangaroa, in the Mangaroa Valley, east of Upper Hutt. Mangaroa station was not originally built prior to the opening of Kaitoke station as part of the Mungaroa Contract. In 1876–1877, a privately-owned 43-wagon capacity siding was laid several chains to the north of Cruickshanks Tunnel to serve a timber mill that was owned, constructed and operated by James Cruickshanks, a member of the Wellington Provincial Council. His siding handled only timber traffic, but also became a stopping place for main line trains, and was known as Cruickshanks. He later built a second mill about half a mile closer to Mangaroa station, but the first remained in use until 1889 when the siding was lifted. The second mill operated its own tramway between the mill and station yard where timber was transferred to railway wagons. During the construction of the Rimutaka Tunnel, a siding was laid from the eastern end of the
    8.17
    6 votes
    3
    Adelaide Railway Station

    Adelaide Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here: Outer Harbor railway line, Adelaide
    Adelaide Railway Station is the central terminus of the Adelaide Metro railway system. It is at 34°55′16″S 138°35′44″E / 34.92111°S 138.59556°E / -34.92111; 138.59556 on the north side of North Terrace, west of Parliament House. The Adelaide Casino is in part of the building that is no longer required for the station. All lines approach the station from the west, and it is a "dead end" station. Almost all trains on the metropolitan network either depart from or terminate here. It has nine platforms, all with broad gauge track. Until 1984 Adelaide station was the terminus for country and interstate passenger trains, but there are no longer any regular country train services in South Australia and all interstate services are standard gauge and call at Adelaide Parklands Terminal. Today 40,000 people pass through Adelaide Railway Station each weekday. Half of these travel during the morning and afternoon peak hours. Free tram and bus services depart from North Terrace outside the station providing easy access to other parts of the city centre. Adelaide’s first railway station opened on the current North Terrace site in 1856. It served the broad gauge line between Adelaide and Port
    6.86
    7 votes
    4
    Woodville Railway Station, New Zealand

    Woodville Railway Station, New Zealand

    • Railways terminating here:
    Woodville railway station is the northern terminus of the Wairarapa Line and is located at the junction with the Palmerston North - Gisborne Line in the small Tararua town of Woodville, 27 km east of Palmerston North in New Zealand’s North Island. Woodville was the railhead of the line from Napier until the line was completed through the Manawatu Gorge, connecting it with Palmerston North in 1891. It was not until 1897 when the Wairarapa Line finally reached its northern terminus that Woodville again became a station of some importance, 10 years after it opened. As a junction, Woodville has hosted a variety of services from the Wairarapa, Manawatu, and Hawkes Bay regions, but has been closed to passenger services since 2001. The station remains distinctive for its unique (to New Zealand) balloon loop track arrangement, which allows trains from Hawke’s Bay direct access to the Wairarapa and vice versa without having to run the locomotive around the train. This means that trains from any direction can use the station, and the loop can also be used to turn locomotives when Woodville is the terminus of a journey. Woodville was initially a station on the Palmerston North – Napier line
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    Redwood Railway Station

    Redwood Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Redwood Railway Station on the suburban rail network of Wellington, New Zealand is on the North Island Main Trunk Railway (NIMT). It is double tracked with staggered side platforms; the up platform (north, towards Paraparaumu) is on the north side of the Tawa Street level crossing, the down platform (towards Wellington) on the south. Redwood is served by Kapiti Line commuter trains operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand every 30 minutes off-peak, more frequently during peak periods. Some peak services run express between Porirua and Wellington and do not stop at Redwood. They are operated by electric multiple units, formerly DM/D class but are now almost always EM/ET class. Two diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Capital Connection and the Overlander, pass through the station but do not stop. The station was closed for up to four months from February 2010. Both platforms at the station were demolished and completely rebuilt as higher, 170 metre long, platforms. Redwood is one of only two stations on the Paraparaumu Line not on track built by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR); the other is Takapu Road to the south. The WMR built the original route of the
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    Christchurch Railway Station

    Christchurch Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Christchurch railway station is in the Canterbury region of New Zealand’s South Island. It is on the Main North Line at Addington junction, and is the only remaining passenger railway station in the city: suburban passenger trains were cancelled due to lack of demand in the 1970s. It is the terminus of the South Island’s two remaining long-distance passenger trains, the TranzAlpine and the Coastal Pacific. The current station is the third Christchurch railway station. The two earlier stations were adjacent to each other on Moorhouse Avenue, a short distance to the east on the Main South Line, closer to the city centre. Christchurch’s first railway station was built by the Canterbury Provincial Council for its 5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) broad-gauge railway line between the city and the wharf at Ferrymead, opening on 1 December 1863. From 1867 the station received traffic from Lyttelton, and from the west, as the Main South Line was extended out to Addington, Rolleston, Selwyn, Rakaia, and destinations further south. Facilities at the station were initially modest, consisting of a platform, station building, goods shed, locomotive shed, staff accommodation, a single main line and siding.
    8.00
    5 votes
    7
    Paddington station

    Paddington station

    • Railways terminating here: Great Western Main Line
    Paddington railway station, also known as London Paddington, is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex. The site is a historic one, having served as the London terminus of the Great Western Railway and its successors since 1838. Much of the current mainline station dates from 1854, and was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The site was first served by Underground trains in 1863, as the original western terminus of the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground railway. The complex has recently been modernised, and now has an additional role as the London terminal for the dedicated Heathrow Express airport service. Paddington is in Travelcard Zone 1. The station is the terminus for services from Reading, Bristol, Cardiff, Swansea, Oxford, Newbury, Taunton, Exeter, Plymouth, Penzance, Cheltenham, Worcester and Hereford, as well as for various inner and outer suburban services. The station complex is bounded at the front by Praed Street and at the rear by Bishop's Bridge Road, which crosses the throat of the mainline station on the recently replaced Bishop's Bridge. On the west side of the station is Eastbourne Terrace, while the east side is
    6.83
    6 votes
    8

    Silverstream Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Silverstream Railway Station is an island platform urban railway station in Silverstream, a suburb of the city of Upper Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand's North Island. It is on the Hutt Valley Line section of the Wairarapa Line. This station is served by Tranz Metro's electric multiple unit trains, typically of the EM/ET class. Silverstream Railway Station serves the following Metlink bus services: The Silverstream Railway Station replaced the former Silverstream Bridge Railway Station when the Melling-Belmont section of the line on the western side of the Hutt Valley, New Zealand and the first rail bridge at Silverstream was closed on 28 February 1954, and the through line to Upper Hutt and the Wairarapa rerouted through the centre of the valley, see Hutt Valley Line.
    9.00
    4 votes
    9

    Brightwater Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Brightwater railway station was a rural railway station that served the town of Brightwater in the Tasman district of New Zealand’s South Island. Brightwater is located on State Highway 6, approximately mid-way between the towns of Richmond, to the north, and Wakefield, to the south. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and existed from 1876 to 1955. Facilities at this station included a Class 5 Vogel-era wooden station building, a platform, goods shed, crossing loop, siding (through the goods shed), station master's house, and windmill. To the east of the station, there was a level crossing where the line crossed Ellis Street before it headed into the curve that led to the straight to Hope and crossed the Waimea River. To the west, the line crossed Lord Rutherford Road, the then main highway south through the area. On the opposite side of Ellis Street there was the two-storey Everett Brothers’ store and G. Robertson’s sawmill and workshop. The first section of the Nelson Section to be built was from Stoke to Foxhill, as the route for this part of the line was the first to be confirmed while the route out of Nelson was still being debated. This included the construction
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Victoria station

    Victoria station

    • Railways terminating here: Brighton Main Line
    Victoria station, also known as London Victoria, is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex. It is named after nearby Victoria Street. With over 73 million passenger entries and exits between April 2010 and March 2011, Victoria is the second busiest railway terminus in London (and the UK) after Waterloo, and includes an air terminal for passengers travelling by train to Gatwick Airport; it is one of 18 stations managed by Network Rail. The area around the station has also become an important interchange for other forms of transport: a local bus station is in the forecourt, and a terminal for nationwide long-distance road coaches at Victoria Coach Station is nearby. Victoria is in Travelcard Zone 1. There are effectively four railway stations on the site: two serving main line routes in south eastern England, one underground station built by the cut-and-cover method serving the District and Circle Lines, and one deep-level tube line station. The National Rail (overground) and London Underground stations will be dealt with separately. The mainline station's most important longer-distance destinations include Brighton, Hove, Worthing, Eastbourne, Canterbury
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    Papakura Train Station

    Papakura Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Papakura Railway Station is on the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland railway network. It features an island platform between the main lines, complete with original wooden station building and signal panel, and a suburban side platform to the west. This station is the terminating point for most suburban passenger train services on the Eastern and Southern Lines (with some trains carrying on to Pukekohe). It also serves the Auckland-Wellington Overlander service. In August 2007, Papakura train station underwent a major upgrade and redevelopment as part of the former Auckland Regional Transport Authority's (ARTA) system-wide upgrade of all stations in Auckland. The new station has been built for six-car trains because of anticipated growth in passenger numbers. 3,000 people pass through each day as of 2007, and another thousand are anticipated to use the station within five years. The new station was the seventh station to be redeveloped by ARTA in 2007. The NZ$4,900,000 Papakura upgrade includes better passenger seating, customer information and lighting, as well as a new CCTV security monitoring system. There is a new footbridge with a lift. Beginning December 2011, the
    6.33
    6 votes
    12
    Torres Vedras

    Torres Vedras

    • Railways terminating here:
    Torres Vedras (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈtoʁɨʒ ˈvɛðɾɐʃ]) is a municipality in the district of Lisbon, Portugal, approximately 50 km north of the capital Lisbon, in the western part of the Centro region. To the south of the municipality run the Lines of Torres Vedras, constructed on the orders of the Duke of Wellington in 1809-10. The coat of arms shows the flagged and roofed castle on red ground. Above the castle is the Portuguese coat of arms, with one star to each side. A mural crown above with five towers symbolizes the city rank. Below is a white scroll with the words CIDADE DE TORRES VEDRAS (Torres Vedras city). Fronting the Atlantic Ocean, Torre Vedres borders to the municipality of Lourinhã to the north, Alenquer to the east, Sobral de Monte Agraço Municipality to the southeast and Mafra to the south. The municipality has a very dispersed population, with 21 urban agglomerations, of which most have less than 200 inhabitants. The resident population in the city of Torres Vedras (approximately 20,000 inhabitants in two largest urban parishes) represents about 25% of the population of the municipality. Altogether the municipality has a population of 75,494, with a population
    8.50
    4 votes
    13
    Reading railway station

    Reading railway station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Reading railway station (formerly Reading General) is a major railway station and transport hub in the English town of Reading. It is situated on the northern edge of the town centre, close to the main retail and commercial areas, and also the River Thames. Adjacent to the railway station is a bus interchange, served by most of Reading's urban and rural bus services. Reading is a major junction point on the National Rail system, and as a consequence the railway station is a major transfer point as well as serving heavy originating and terminating traffic. In terms of passenger entries and exits between April 2010 and March 2011, Reading is the ninth-busiest station outside London. The station is served by three train operating companies - First Great Western, South West Trains and CrossCountry. It is sponsored by ING Direct and the University of Reading. The first Reading station was opened on 30 March 1840 as the temporary western terminus of the original line of the Great Western Railway (GWR). At a stroke the time taken to travel from London to Reading was reduced to one hour and five minutes, less than a quarter of the time taken by the fastest stagecoach. The line was extended
    7.20
    5 votes
    14
    Upper Hutt Railway Station

    Upper Hutt Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Upper Hutt railway station is a two-platform urban railway station serving the city of Upper Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. The station lies on the Wairarapa Line, and is on Station Crescent, off Fergusson Drive. This station is served by the Wairarapa Connection (as a through station) and Tranz Metro electric multiple units (as a terminus station) trains. The station has a ticket office, and was staffed full-time until early 2007 because of its railway signalling responsibilities for the Trentham-Upper Hutt-Featherston section. It is within sight of the Upper Hutt Police Station and Upper Hutt City Council chambers, and next to a shopping precinct. A big-format retail development opened in 2007 to the north of the station between Fergusson Drive and Park Street. Construction of the Wairarapa Line to Upper Hutt was covered by the River Contract, which was let to contractor Charles McKirdy. The rails reached Upper Hutt in January 1876. Severe flooding at the end of January caused the road between Upper Hutt and Taita to become blocked and damaged, and so to minimise the impact caused by delays to road traffic, the Upper Hutt station was opened on 1
    7.20
    5 votes
    15

    Waitakere Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Waitakere Railway Station is located in the Waitakere suburb/village at the end of the Western Line of the Auckland Suburban Network in New Zealand and is currently the terminus for most Western Line services. Waitakere station features a shunting yard, a turntable and has a small station building, which is in a poor state of repair. This station opened in 1881 and is one of the original stations on this section of the North Auckland Line. When it first opened it was called Waitakerei. The station kept that name until 1909 when it changed to the current spelling. In 1972 the station's building was replaced, the old building being relocated to MOTAT for preservation. This station has been the terminus for many suburban train services from the 1930s, a status it has retained despite a low level of patronage. In 1980, after a daily service between Auckland and Helensville was withdrawn, this station became the terminus point for all suburban services and the northernmost passenger station in New Zealand. During the off-peak period on Mondays to Fridays, every second train continues to Waitakere from Swanson while the other trains terminate at Swanson and return to Britomart. The
    7.20
    5 votes
    16
    St. Petersburg

    St. Petersburg

    • Railways terminating here:
    St. Petersburg is a city in Pinellas County, Florida, United States. It is known as a vacation destination for both American and foreign tourists. As of the 2010 census, the population was 244,769, making St. Petersburg the fourth most populous city in the state of Florida and the largest city in Florida that is not a county seat. Although the city of Clearwater is the county seat of Pinellas County, all county services are available through county offices in St. Petersburg. St. Petersburg is the second largest city in the Tampa Bay Area, which is composed of roughly 2.8 million residents, making it the second largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in the state. The city is often referred to by locals as St. Pete. Neighboring St. Pete Beach formally shortened its name in 1994 after a vote by its residents. The city is located on a peninsula between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. It is connected to mainland Florida to the north; with the city of Tampa to the east by causeways and bridges across Tampa Bay; and to Bradenton in the south by the Sunshine Skyway Bridge (Interstate 275), which traverses the mouth of the bay. It is also served by Interstates 175 and 375, which branch off
    6.17
    6 votes
    17
    Glen Eden Train Station

    Glen Eden Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Glen Eden Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network, New Zealand. The station house is a local historical landmark that was restored in 2001. A cafe is located in the old station building. When first opened, one of the station's functions was to service the nearby Waikumete Cemetery. Special trains ran from Auckland on Sundays carrying the deceased and their entourage, and a dedicated platform was constructed to serve these trains.
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Darlington

    Darlington

    • Railways terminating here:
    Darlington is a market town in the Borough of Darlington, part of the ceremonial county of County Durham, in the North East of England. It lies on the small River Skerne, a tributary of the River Tees, not far from the main river. It is the main population centre in the borough, with a population of 97,838 as of 2001. The town owes much of its development to the influence of local Quaker families during the Victorian era, and it is famous as the location of the world's first passenger railway. It is popularly known by locals as "Darlo". The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line. The name Darlington derives from the Anglo-Saxon Dearthington, which seemingly meant 'the settlement of Deornoth's people' but by Norman times the name had changed to Derlinton. During the 17th and 18th centuries the town was generally known by the name of Darnton. Darlington started life as an Anglo-Saxon settlement. It has an historic market area in the town centre. Built in 1183, the Grade I listed St Cuthbert's Church is one of the most important early English churches in the north of England. Visiting during the 18th century, Daniel Defoe noted that the town was eminent for
    6.80
    5 votes
    19

    Ellerslie Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Ellerslie Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform. Access to the station at the northern end is by a ramp down from the footbridge crossing the SH1 Southern Motorway between Main Highway, Ellerslie and Kalmia Street. At the southern end of the station there is an underpass between Findlay Street and Sultan Street. In December 1873 a railway line between Auckland and Onehunga via Newmarket, Ellerslie and Penrose was opened with great public celebration. The line through Ellerslie subsequently became part of the North Island Main Trunk and later the North Auckland Line, with the branch line from Penrose to Onehunga becoming the Onehunga Branch. The station at Ellerslie was initially between the railway bridges, with the main road running directly through the village and intersecting the line at a level crossing. By 1874 residents became concerned at a number of accidents that had occurred at the crossing and successfully lobbied for relocation of the station to the opposite side of the road, requiring realignment of the road to its present route. The railway encouraged suburban settlement and allowed a daily delivery of letters
    6.80
    5 votes
    20
    Lisbon

    Lisbon

    • Railways terminating here:
    Lisbon (/ˈlɪzbən/; Portuguese: Lisboa, IPA: [ɫiʒˈboɐ]) is the capital city and largest city of Portugal with a population of 547,631 within its administrative limits on a land area of 84.8 km (33 sq mi). The urban area of Lisbon extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of over 3 million on an area of 958 km (370 sq mi), making it the 9th most populous urban area in the European Union. About 2,831,000 people live in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (which represents approximately 27% of the population of the country). Lisbon is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River. Lisbon is recognised as a global city because of its importance in finance, commerce, media, entertainment, arts, international trade, education, and tourism. It is one of the major economic centres on the continent, with a growing financial sector and the largest/second largest container port on Europe's Atlantic coast. Lisbon Portela Airport serves about 13 million passengers per year; the motorway network and the high-speed rail
    8.00
    4 votes
    21
    Newmarket Train Station

    Newmarket Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Newmarket Train Station is in Auckland, New Zealand on the Southern and Western Lines of the Auckland railway network. In Newmarket's busy commercial centre, it is the second-busiest station in Auckland, after Britomart. All express services stop here, including the Pukekohe and Waitakere expresses. In its historic configuration it had an island platform, reached by a ramp from Remuera Road (opposite Nuffield Street) and from the end of Joseph Banks Terrace by a pedestrian overbridge. In 2008 the station building and signalbox were removed and a new building and platforms constructed on the same site over the following two years. From January 2010 the new station catered for increased patronage of up to 17,000 passengers a day by 2016 and has more entrances. During the redevelopment two temporary stations served the area, both now demolished: Newmarket West (also called Kingdon Street) and Newmarket South. The old building was one of four island platform stations in Auckland designed and built by George Troup, Chief Engineer for the New Zealand Railways Department. The station was built in 1908, at the time of the installation of double track. Before closure, the head of the
    6.60
    5 votes
    22
    Greenwich

    Greenwich

    • Railways terminating here: London and Greenwich Railway
    Royal Greenwich (UK /ɡrɪnɪdʒ/ GRIN-ij; US /ɡrɛnɪtʃ/ GREN-ich or /ɡrɛnɪdʒ/ GREN-ij) is a district of south-east London, England, located in the Royal Borough of Greenwich and situated 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east south-east of Charing Cross. Royal Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many in the House of Tudor, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was rebuilt as the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained an establishment for military education until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. The town became a popular resort in the 17th century and many grand houses were built there, such as
    7.75
    4 votes
    23
    Ngauranga Train Station

    Ngauranga Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Ngauranga railway station is a single island platform railway station in the mainly industrial and commercial suburb of Ngauranga on the Wairarapa Line in Wellington, New Zealand. It is served by the trains of the Melling Line and Hutt Valley Line of the Wellington suburban rail network. Wairarapa Connection trains pass this station but do not stop. All trains are run by KiwiRail under the Tranz Metro brand as part of the Metlink network. Ngauranga formerly handled freight traffic, but is now used exclusively by commuter passenger trains. It is next to a waste disposal facility and at the bottom of the Ngauranga Gorge, next to the major road junction where State Highway 2 joins State Highway 1. Though the rails of the Wairarapa Line reached Ngahauranga at New Year 1874, the first section of the line was not opened until 14 April 1874. Trains initially ran non-stop to the terminus of the line from Wellington, and it would not be until a week after opening, on 20 April, that Ngahauranga was included as a stop. Ngahauranga received its first building in late 1875. About 1879, the station received a class 6 passenger shelter costing £160. At the time, it had neither crossing loops nor
    7.75
    4 votes
    24
    Tamagawa Station

    Tamagawa Station

    • Railways terminating here: Tokyu Tamagawa Line
    Tamagawa Station (多摩川駅, -eki) is a train station located in Ota, Tokyo. There are two levels. The high level station serves the Toyoko and Meguro lines, while the low level station is the terminus of the Tokyu Tamagawa Line.
    6.40
    5 votes
    25
    Kenepuru Railway Station

    Kenepuru Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Kenepuru Railway Station is on the North Island Main Trunk Railway (NIMT) in New Zealand, on Wellington's suburban rail network. It is double tracked, has a side platform layout on a curved section of the line, and is 16.16 km from Wellington Railway Station, the southern terminus of the NIMT. It is within walking distance of Kenepuru Hospital. Kenepuru is served by Metlink Kapiti Line commuter trains operated by Tranz Metro. Trains run every 30 minutes off-peak, and more frequently during peak periods. Some peak services run express between Porirua and Wellington and do not stop at Kenepuru. The commuter trains are operated by electric multiple units. These were formerly DM/D class units but are now almost always units of the EM/ET class. Two diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Capital Connection and the Overlander, pass through the station but do not stop. Kenepuru was under consideration for closure by the Greater Wellington Regional Council as it was claimed that it had low usage and requireed considerable expenditure for upgrading for the new Matangi units, and for safety reasons. However, it was announced on 5 October 2011 that is was safe for now and minor remedial work would
    7.50
    4 votes
    26
    Santa Maria de Belém

    Santa Maria de Belém

    • Railways terminating here: Belém to Cascais Railway
    Santa Maria de Belém, or just Belém (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsɐ̃tɐ mɐˈɾiɐ dɨ bɨˈlɐ̃ȷ̃]), whose name is derived from the Portuguese word for Bethlehem, is a civil parish of the municipality of Lisbon, in central Portugal. At the mouth of the Tagus River it is located six kilometres west of the city centre and two kilometres west of Ponte 25 de Abril (25th of April Bridge). The first settlement of this region dates back to the Paleolithic, from archaeological evidence discovered along margins of the river courses. With the Kingdom of Portugal established, during the reign of Afonso III of Portugal the royal inventory (Portuguese: Inquirições) determined that settlement was dispersed, occupying many of the lowlands lands on the avails of agriculture. The connection of Belém to the neighbouring Lisbon was cemented by a bridge, at Alcântara. Belém's proximity to the Tagus River also influenced the development of commercial activities in the small village, especially in the Aldeia do Restelo, which attracted marines and seafarers, rather travelling to Lisbon. In the 14th century, settled Moors cultivated the lands and serviced the city; other Moors, both free and slave, would work in
    7.50
    4 votes
    27

    Hutt Park Railway Station, Petone

    • Railways terminating here:
    Hutt Park railway station was on the privately owned but government operated Hutt Park Railway in Petone, a suburb of the city of Lower Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. It was on the western bank of the Hutt River, adjacent to a bridge that carried pipes over the Hutt River, near present day Waione Street. The station was built for, and only ever handled, patrons for the Hutt Park Raceway who arrived on special race trains from Wellington. The station was only busy for several days a year during racing season, and operated between 1885 and 1906. The first passengers to arrive were those heading for the race meetings held by the Wellington Racing Club on 6 and 7 February 1885, with the line having been certified by the Chief Engineer the previous day. Facilities initially provided included a 400 feet (120 m) long platform, a siding, and a small ticket office. Several complaints were made over the years about the inadequacy of these facilities, with one such missive in 1895 noting that the platform was in poor shape, a barrier on the pipe bridge was required to control the flow of passengers from the racecourse on to the platform, another siding with a 40
    7.25
    4 votes
    28
    Kilrush

    Kilrush

    • Railways terminating here: West Clare Railway
    Kilrush (Irish: Cill Rois, meaning "Church of the Woods") is a coastal town in County Clare, Ireland. It is located near the mouth of the River Shannon in the south-west of the county. Kilrush is a town of great historical significance, being one of the listed Heritage Towns of Ireland. Kilrush has existed since the 16th century but it was not until the 18th century that it underwent major development. This development coincided with the succession of John Ormsby Vandeleur as the wealthiest landlord in the district. Of Dutch origin, the Vandeleur family was the most prominent landlord family in West Clare. They designed the layout of the town and many of the present day street names derive from Vandeleur family names. John Ormsby Vandeleur built the large family home, Kilrush House in 1808. He owned much of Kilrush. With wealth achieved from a financially beneficial marriage and some political skulduggery, he decided to develop the town. A Scots businessman James Paterson, who had been a gunboat lieutenant until 1802, assisted him in this project. Paterson entered the oats trade in west Clare and in 1802 he was given a site on the square from Vandeleur and erected a six-storey
    7.25
    4 votes
    29
    Newmarket South Train Station

    Newmarket South Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Newmarket South Train Station one of the two temporary stations serving the Newmarket area until the redevelopment of Newmarket Train Station is finished. It is located on the North Auckland Line and serviced by Southern Line train services of the Auckland railway network.
    7.25
    4 votes
    30
    Papatoetoe Train Station

    Papatoetoe Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Papatoetoe Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network in New Zealand. It is between Station Road and Shirley Road, across the street from Papatoetoe West School, and has an island platform layout. Papatoetoe was originally called Papatoitoi, a corruption of its true name. The name was corrected in 1907, by the New Zealand Railways Department, because of the obvious discrepancy with the town it served, which has always been spelt as "Papatoetoe". The old station building, restored by the Papatoetoe Railway Station Preservation Trust, has been moved to the corner of Station Road, Shirley Road, Tavern Lane & St George Street. Parts of this building dated back to 1875. A new station was constructed on the present site. The old station is an integral part of the area's history, with Old Papatoetoe developing as a commercial centre.
    10.00
    2 votes
    31
    Durango

    Durango

    • Railways terminating here: Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad
    The City of Durango is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of La Plata County, Colorado, United States. The United States Census Bureau reported a population of 16,887 in the 2010 census. The town was organized in September 1881 by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG) to serve the San Juan mining district. The D&RG chose a site south of Animas City for its depot after Animas City refused to pay a dowry to the D&RG. The city is named after Durango, Mexico, which was named after Durango, Spain. The word Durango originates from the Basque word "Urango" meaning "water town". Area archaeological sites on the State and National historical registers include: Durango is located at 37°16′N 107°52′W / 37.267°N 107.867°W / 37.267; -107.867 at an elevation of 1988 metres (6512 feet). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.8 square miles (18 km). As of the census of 2000, there were 13,922 people, 5,492 households, and 2,603 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,052.4 people per square mile (792.8/km²). There were 5,819 housing units at an average density of 857.8 per square mile
    8.33
    3 votes
    32

    Manor Park Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Manor Park Railway Station is an island platform urban railway station in Manor Park, a suburb of the city of Lower Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand's North Island. It is on the Hutt Valley Line section of the Wairarapa Line. This station is served by Tranz Metro's electric multiple unit trains. In 1954 the Hutt Valley Branch became the main line, and the Melling-Haywards section was closed. A new station was erected at Haywards (now called Manor Park) where the new line from Pomare joined the existing line north. The old Haywards Railway Station station had been opened (with Belmont Railway Station) on 15 December 1875..
    8.33
    3 votes
    33

    Mt Eden Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Mt Eden Railway Station is a Western Line station of the local railway network in the Mount Eden suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. It has an island platform, and is reached via a footbridge from Mt Eden Rd or from the level crossing between Ngahura Street and Fenton Street. Transfers to the following bus services can be made at the bus stops on Mt Eden Road: The Mt Eden Local Control Panel was installed in the station building in 1967 and removed from service in 1995 when the station building was removed. The panel has been preserved in working order.
    8.33
    3 votes
    34
    Letterkenny

    Letterkenny

    • Railways terminating here: Strabane and Letterkenny Railway
    Letterkenny (Irish: Leitirceanainn, meaning "Hillside of the O'Cannons") is the largest and most populous town in County Donegal, Ireland. It is also largest and tidiest urban centre in the north-west of the country. Its English name is derived from the Irish name Leitirceanainn, meaning "Hillside of the O'Cannons" – the O'Cannons being the last of the ancient chieftains of Tír Conaill. With a population of 19,588, Letterkenny is located on the River Swilly in east Donegal. Letterkenny, along with the nearby city of Derry, forms the major economic core of the north-west of the island of Ireland. The modern urban centre of Letterkenny began as a market town at the start of the 17th century, during the Plantation of Ulster. An ancient castle once stood near where the Cathedral of St. Eunan and St. Columba, Donegal's only Roman Catholic cathedral, stands today. Letterkenny Castle, built in 1625, was located south of Mount Southwell on Castle Street. Donegal and the north-west's premier third-level institution, the Letterkenny Institute of Technology (LYIT), is located in the town, as are Saint Eunan's College, Highland Radio, and the only Hindu temple in the Republic of Ireland.
    7.00
    4 votes
    35
    Miami

    Miami

    • Railways terminating here: Silver Star
    Miami ( /maɪˈæmi/ or /maɪˈæmə/) is a city located on the Atlantic coast in southeastern Florida and the county seat of Miami-Dade County. The 42nd largest city proper in the United States, with a population of 408,568, it is the principal, central, and most populous city of the Miami metropolitan area, and the most populous metropolis in the Southeastern United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Miami's metro area is the seventh most populous and fourth-largest urban area in the United States, with a population of around 5.5 million. Miami is a major center and a leader in finance, commerce, culture, media, entertainment, the arts, and international trade. In 2010, Miami was classified as a Alpha- World City in the World Cities Study Group’s inventory. In 2010, Miami ranked seventh in the United States in terms of finance, commerce, culture, entertainment, fashion, education, and other sectors. It ranked thirty-third among global cities. In 2008, Forbes magazine ranked Miami "America's Cleanest City", for its year-round good air quality, vast green spaces, clean drinking water, clean streets and city-wide recycling programs. According to a 2009 UBS study of 73 world
    7.00
    4 votes
    36
    Outer Harbor railway station, Adelaide

    Outer Harbor railway station, Adelaide

    • Railways terminating here: Outer Harbor railway line, Adelaide
    Outer Harbor railway station is the terminus of one of Adelaide’s suburban rail routes – the Outer Harbor line. It is located in the suburb of North Haven, rather than Outer Harbor. The Outer Harbor line serves Adelaide’s north-western suburbs, Port Adelaide and the Le Fevre Peninsula. Outer Harbor station is located 21.9km (13¾ miles) from Adelaide Railway Station on the northern extremity of the Le Fevre Peninsula and adjacent to the Outer Harbor Overseas Passenger Terminal. All train services are operated by TransAdelaide diesel railcars. Trains to Adelaide operate every 30 minutes during Monday – Friday off-peak times. There is a more frequent service during peak hours and one train per hour in the evenings and at weekends. There are no freight services through Outer Harbor station. The track layout at Outer Harbor station comprises a simple single line which terminates just beyond the end of the station platform. Platform #1: Port facilities at Outer Harbor were constructed during the first decade of the 20th century. This involved reclamation of marshland and the building of wharves and breakwaters. A railway line was built northwards from Largs in 1903 to facilitate this
    7.00
    4 votes
    37
    Panmure Train Station

    Panmure Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Panmure Train Station is on the Eastern Line of the Auckland railway network in New Zealand. Panmure Station is accessed from Ellerslie - Panmure Highway. Panmure station was relocated at the end of 2006 as part of the Auckland Regional Transport Authority's (ARTA) upgrade of train stations across the Auckland rail network. As part of the upgrade, which was a collaboration between ARTA, Auckland City Council and the Auckland Regional Transport Network Limited (ARTNL), the station was moved to northwest of Panmure Town Centre to increase patronage. The previous location, approximately 500 m southwest, was considered too far away. The new station incorporates a bus-rail interchange.
    7.00
    4 votes
    38
    Euston railway station

    Euston railway station

    • Railways terminating here: West Coast Main Line
    Euston railway station, also known as London Euston, is a central London railway terminus. It is the sixth busiest rail terminal in London (by entries and exits). It is one of 18 railway stations managed by Network Rail, and is the southern terminus of the West Coast Main Line. Euston is the main rail gateway from London to the West Midlands, the North West, North Wales and part of Scotland. Its most important long-distance destinations are Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Glasgow. Euston station is the prime gateway historically and presently from London to Ireland travelling by rail to Holyhead and ferry to Dún Laoghaire and along the line to Dublin. Historically, there was also a route to Belfast via Stranraer over the WCML as far as Carlisle, and then connecting via the Castle Douglas and Dumfries Railway, however this route was closed in the 1960s as part of the Beeching Axe reforms. It is connected to Euston tube station and near Euston Square tube station on the London Underground. It is also a short walk from Kings Cross Station, the southern terminus of the East Coast Main Line. These stations are all in Travelcard Zone 1. Although the present station building is in
    6.75
    4 votes
    39
    London Bridge station

    London Bridge station

    • Railways terminating here: London and Greenwich Railway
    London Bridge railway station is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex in the London Borough of Southwark, occupying a large area on two levels immediately south-east of London Bridge and 1.6 miles (2.6 km) east of Charing Cross. The main line station contains nine terminal platforms and six through platforms for services from south and east of London. Through services continue onto Charing Cross, Cannon Street or Blackfriars. It is one of the oldest railway stations in the world. In terms of passenger arrivals and departures it is the fourth busiest station within London as well as the UK as a whole, handling over 54 million people a year. However, these statistics do not take into account the large number of commuters who transfer between lines at the station. The mainline station is one of 17 railway stations managed by Network Rail All platforms are accessed through ticket barriers. The London Underground station serves the Jubilee line and the Bank branch of the Northern line. It consists of a ticket hall and entrance area with its main frontage on Tooley Street, along with entrances and exits on Borough High Street. The tube station may also be
    9.50
    2 votes
    40
    Brighton railway station

    Brighton railway station

    • Railways terminating here: Brighton Main Line
    Brighton railway station is the principal railway station in the city of Brighton and Hove, on the south coast of England. The station was built by the London & Brighton Railway in 1840, initially connecting Brighton to Shoreham-by-Sea, westwards along the coast, and shortly afterwards connecting it to London Bridge 51 miles (82 km) to the north, and to the county town of Lewes to the east. In 1846, the railway became the London Brighton and South Coast Railway following merger with other railways with lines between Portsmouth and Hastings. In terms of passenger entries and exits between April 2010 and March 2011, Brighton is the eighth-busiest station outside London. The London and Brighton Railway (L&BR) built a passenger station, goods station, locomotive depot and railway works on a difficult site on the northern edge of Brighton. This site was a half mile from, and seventy feet above the sea shore, and had involved considerable excavation work to create a reasonable gradient from Patcham Tunnel. The passenger station was a three-storey building in an Italianate style, designed by David Mocatta in 1839–40 which incorporated the head office of the railway company. (This building
    8.00
    3 votes
    41
    Cascais

    Cascais

    • Railways terminating here: Belém to Cascais Railway
    Cascais (Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐʃˈkajʃ]) is a coastal town in Cascais Municipality in Portugal, 30 kilometres west of Lisbon, with about 35,000 residents. It is a cosmopolitan suburb of the Portuguese capital and one of the richest municipalities in Portugal. The former fishing village gained fame as a resort for Portugal's royal family in the late 19th century and early 20th century. Nowadays, it is a popular vacation spot for both Portuguese and foreign tourists. It is located in the Estoril Coast (named after Estoril, a civil parish), in the Greater Lisbon subregion. It has an airport for general aviation serving the Lisbon Region in Tires (S. Domingos de Rana), Aeroporto Municipal de Cascais. The coastal settlement of Cascais originated in the 12th century, depending administratively on the town of Sintra, located to the north. In its humble beginnings, Cascais lived from the products of the sea and land, but already in the 13th century, its fish production served the capital Lisbon, located nearby. During the 14th century, the population increased to the outside of the walls of its castle. Its prosperity led to the administrative independence from Sintra in 1364. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    42

    Wallaceville Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Wallaceville Railway Station is a single-platform urban railway station serving the suburb of Wallaceville in Upper Hutt. The station lies on the Hutt Valley Line section of the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt Railway Station and Trentham Railway Station, and is located on Maclean Street, off Ward Street. This station is served by Tranz Metro's electric multiple unit trains, typically of the EM/ET class. Tranz Metro tickets can be purchased from the dairy on the corner of Maclean and Ward Streets. It is popular amongst commuters as there is a large park and ride facility as well as bicycle lockers. Currently the stretch between Upper Hutt and Trentham is single track, but the 2011 – 2012 Regional Rail Plan (RRP) proposes duplicating the track between Trentham and Upper Hutt in 2012. As a result, Wallaceville will become a double-track station. The station was opened in 1879
    8.00
    3 votes
    43
    Wellington Railway Station

    Wellington Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Wellington Railway Station is the southern terminus of New Zealand's North Island Main Trunk railway, Wairarapa Line and Johnsonville Line. In terms of number of services and in passenger numbers, it is New Zealand's busiest railway station. Wellington's first station, Pipitea, was built in 1874 as part of the city's first railway line, to the Hutt Valley, which opened that year. This station building burned down in 1878 and was replaced in 1880 by what became known as Lambton, built by New Zealand Government Railways to service the Wairarapa line. Six years later a station later called Thorndon, was built by the privately-owned Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company. This company was purchased by the New Zealand government in 1908 to incorporate the line into what became the North Island Main Trunk, via Johnsonville. Once both stations were in government control public pressure began to build for a single terminal. The government decided on a co-ordinated development that included a new station building, and also after agreement was reached in 1922 between the Railways Department and the Wellington Harbour Board, the reclamation of about 68 acres (28 hectares) which would
    8.00
    3 votes
    44
    Kawatiri Railway Station

    Kawatiri Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Kawatiri railway station was a rural railway station that served the small settlement of Kawatiri in the Tasman District of New Zealand’s South Island. Kawatiri is located on State Highway 6 at the junction with State Highway 63. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and marked the furthest extent of Railways Department operations on the line. Kawatiri is perhaps most notable for being one of the shortest-lived stations operated by the Railways Department: 5 years, 21 days between 1926 and 1931. Kawatiri is situated in the Hope River gorge, with the Kahurangi National Park to the west and the Hope River to the east. State Highway 63 crossed the station yard via a bridge at the northern end of the yard, before crossing the Hope River and continuing on into the Wairau Valley. State Highway 6 passed by the station to the west between the station yard and the national park. Facilities at this station included a platform, loading bank, goods shed, siding, passenger shelter and equipment shed. During the construction of the Kawatiri Section, as it became known, the Pikomanu workers camp was established in the Hope River gorge, between what would become the Kawatiri tunnel and
    6.50
    4 votes
    45
    London

    London

    • Railways terminating here:
    London /ˈlʌndən/ is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who named it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core. The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region and the Greater London administrative area, governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence. It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world depending on measurement. London has been described as a world cultural capital. It is the
    6.50
    4 votes
    46
    Awarua Street Railway Station

    Awarua Street Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Awarua Street railway station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island, and serves the suburb of Ngaio. It is one of two stations that were added to the line when it was upgraded prior to being reopened as the Johnsonville Branch, and one of the four stations on the line to be located on a curve. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). As part of the upgrade of the section of the old Wellington and Manawatu Railway between Wellington and Johnsonville, two new stations were constructed, one of which was Awarua Street. It opened on 2 July 1938 along with the newly electrified Johnsonville Branch. Timetabled services began the following Monday. Over the summer of 2008/09, the platform of the station was entirely demolished to be replaced by a brand new platform that could accommodate six carriages, as opposed to four. The replaced platform is twice the size of the old platform. Trains run in both directions through this station, departing at half-hourly intervals,
    7.67
    3 votes
    47
    Kaiwharawhara Train Station

    Kaiwharawhara Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Kaiwharawhara railway station is a dual island platform railway station on the North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) and the Wairarapa Line in Wellington, New Zealand. It is the first station north of Wellington, and is served by trains operated by Tranz Metro as part of the Metlink network on the Melling Line, the Hutt Valley Line and the Kapiti Line. Three diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Wairarapa Connection, Capital Connection and Overlander services pass through the station but do not stop. Kaiwharawhara has a unique platform arrangement for New Zealand. Looking north, the left-hand island platform is for up trains, the right-hand for down trains. The inner faces are used by Kapiti Line services on the NIMT, the outer faces by Melling Line and Hutt Valley Line services on the Wairarapa Line. Just north of the station the NIMT climbs an embankment towards the bridge that takes it across the up Wairarapa Line track and Hutt Road to Tawa No. 1 Tunnel. The Wairarapa Line reached the south bank of the Kaiwarra Stream in July 1873, and this section of line opened on 14 April 1874. Trains initially ran non-stop from Wellington, but on 20 April Kaiwarra opened as a stop. Kaiwarra received
    7.67
    3 votes
    48

    Southdown Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Southdown Train Station is an unused station on the Southern Line of the Auckland suburban railway network. It is double tracked and has an island platform layout. Services were withdrawn by the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA) on 30 May 2004 due to low patronage and safety reasons. In the years immediately preceding its closure, patronage had increased on Auckland suburban trains but Southdown had not followed the trend and passenger usage of the station had declined to only approximately forty people per weekday. Safety concerns were raised due to the poor state of the footbridge used to access the platform, and the fact that to access the footbridge, passengers had to cross an unprotected freight siding.
    7.67
    3 votes
    49
    Fremantle

    Fremantle

    • Railways terminating here: Fremantle railway line, Perth
    Fremantle ( /ˈfriːmæntl/) is a city in Western Australia, located at the mouth of the Swan River. Fremantle Harbour serves as the port of Perth, the state capital. Fremantle was the first area settled by the Swan River colonists in 1829. It was declared a city in 1929, and has a population of approximately 25,000. The city is named after Captain Charles Howe Fremantle, the English naval officer who had pronounced possession of Western Australia and who established a camp at the site. The city contains well-preserved 19th-century buildings and other heritage features. The Western Australian vernacular diminutive for Fremantle is Freo. Fremantle lies on a series of limestone hills known by the Nyungar people as Booyeembara; the sandplain to the east is Gardoo. The original vegetation of the area was mainly Xanthorrhoea and eucalyptus trees, which were traditionally fired annually by the Aboriginal people. Fremantle is the end of the Fremantle railway line which runs from Perth to Fremantle, run by the Western Australia's Public Transport Authority. Major highways including Stirling Highway, Canning Highway and Leach Highway have Fremantle as their start point and/or
    9.00
    2 votes
    50
    Greenlane Train Station

    Greenlane Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Greenlane Railway Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform and is reached via a ramp from Green Lane East. It is the nearest station to Ellerslie Racecourse and Greenlane Hospital and showgrounds. The station is served by bus route 007, which runs from St Heliers to Point Chevalier via Glen Innes and St Lukes. Early in the morning of 2 December 2007 a suspicious fire destroyed a derelict shed adjacent to the station - contrary to media reports at the time, it was not the station's goods shed.
    9.00
    2 votes
    51

    Otahuhu Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Otahuhu Train Station is located on the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland rail network. It has an island platform layout and can be reached by pedestrian overbridges from Walmsey Road Road and Titi Street. Otahuhu station features a signal box and is the point where both freight and passenger trains enter and exit the main line from the Westfield locomotive depot. The station was opened in the 1870s to serve the increasing settlement at Otahuhu, with a road eventually constructed to the station. The station included a goods shed and a main building, which however burned down in 1909 after a fire in the oil room got out of hand with no water supply available to suppress the fires. The station, as of 2010, remains one of the worst-maintained on the Auckland network. Concerns have also repeatedly been raised in previous years about the security situation (especially at night) and the distance to the nearest bus services, with the station located in an out-of-the-way industrial area. In May 2011, Auckland Transport and KiwiRail started work to lengthen the platform to accommodate longer passenger trains. The platform area around the signal box will be raised and further
    9.00
    2 votes
    52
    Manurewa Train Station

    Manurewa Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Manurewa Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. The station has a side platform layout connected by a pedestrian footbridge. Access is from both Selwyn Road and SouthMall Shopping Centre. The station has a large park-and-ride facility and interchange with many local bus services. Transfers to the following bus services can be made at the bus stops on Manurewa Interchange:
    7.33
    3 votes
    53
    Mt Albert Train Station

    Mt Albert Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Mount Albert Railway Station is in the suburb of Mount Albert on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network, near Unitec, a local tertiary education provider, and is popular with Unitec students. It has an island platform and is reached by a footbridge from Carrington Road and a subway between Willcott Street and New North Road. In 2010, significant discussion, including during the run-up to the local body elections, considered the station (and especially its access-ways and weather shelters) as dilapidated and in need of renewal. Also particularly criticised were the run-down shop rear areas fronting the train stations from the New North Road side. A former Auckland City councilor suggested that a green wall would offer an option to hide these unsightly areas behind low-cost, low-maintenance planting. The following bus services pass this station, allowing easy transfer, although there are no signs or information provided at the station:
    7.33
    3 votes
    54
    Britomart Transport Centre

    Britomart Transport Centre

    • Railways terminating here:
    Britomart Transport Centre is the CBD public transport hub of Auckland, New Zealand, and the northern terminus of the North Island Main Trunk line. It combines a bus interchange with a railway station in a former Edwardian post office, extended with expansive post-modernist architectural elements. It is located at the foot of Queen Street, the main commercial thoroughfare of Auckland CBD, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. The centre was the result of many design iterations, some of them being substantially larger and including an underground bus terminal and a large underground car park. Political concerns and cost implications meant that these concepts did not proceed. However, at the time of its inception in the early 2000s, the centre was still Auckland's largest transport project ever, built to move rail access closer to the city's CBD and help boost Auckland's low usage of public transport. It is one of the few underground railway stations in the world designed for use of diesel locomotives. Initially seen as underused and too costly, it is now considered a great success, though also heading for capacity with the growing uptake of rail commuting in the
    5.20
    5 votes
    55

    Ranui Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Ranui Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland rail network. It serves the communities of Ranui and Pooks Road, in the suburbs of Waitakere City. Suburban Train Services are provided by Veolia (New Zealand) on behalf of the Auckland Transport. There are no train services on Sundays. As part of upgrades to Auckland's urban rail network, ARTA had proposed building a stabling yard to store up to 11 trains to the west of the station. The yard was to be used to clean trains when out of service. As part of the facility there was to be staff car parking and welfare facilities but due opposition from locals this was abandoned and moved to Henderson.
    5.20
    5 votes
    56
    Kilkee

    Kilkee

    • Railways terminating here: West Clare Railway
    Kilkee (Irish: Cill Chaoi, meaning "Church of Chaoineadh Ita - lamentation for Ita") is a small coastal town in County Clare, Ireland. It is located midway between Kilrush and Doonbeg on the N67 road. The town, one of the most famous resorts in Ireland, is particularly popular as a seaside resort with people from Limerick City. The horseshoe bay is protected from the Atlantic Ocean weather by the Duggerna Reef. Kilkee has regularly been awarded the Blue Flag by the European Commission. In 2006, a statue of Richard Harris was unveiled in Kilkee by actor Russell Crowe who spoke very highly of the town saying it had some of the best public walks in the world. During the early part of the 19th century, Kilkee was just a small fishing village but in the 1820's when a paddle steamer service from Limerick to Kilrush was launched, it began to attract visitors. It has been a resort since then and was featured on the front page of the Illustrated London News as the premier bathing spot in what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. As the town was more accessible to people from Limerick rather than Clare, holidaying in Kilkee became more of a Limerick custom, due to
    10.00
    1 votes
    57
    Simla Crescent Railway Station

    Simla Crescent Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Simla Crescent railway station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island, and is one of two stations that were added to the line when it was upgraded prior to being reopened as the Johnsonville Branch. It serves the suburbs of Ngaio and Te Kainga. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). As part of the upgrade of the section of the old Wellington and Manawatu Railway between Wellington and Johnsonville, two new stations were constructed, one of which was Simla Crescent. It opened on 2 July 1938 along with the newly electrified Johnsonville Branch. Timetabled services began the following Monday. Trains run in both directions through this station, departing at half-hourly intervals, supplemented by a 13/13/26 schedule at peak times on week days. The nearest bus routes are #44 and #45 at the corner of Cockayne Road and Clutha Avenue. This station has a single side platform and passenger shelter. Pedestrian access is from Khandallah Road or Simla Crescent. There is no
    10.00
    1 votes
    58
    Southampton

    Southampton

    • Railways terminating here:
    Southampton /saʊθˈhæmptən/ is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England, and is situated 75 miles (121 km) south-west of London and 19 miles (31 km) north-west of Portsmouth. Southampton is a major port and the closest city to the New Forest. It lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water at the confluence of the River Test and River Itchen, with the River Hamble joining to the south of the urban area. The local authority is Southampton City Council, which is a unitary authority. The city represents the core of the Greater Southampton region, and the city itself has an estimated population of 239,700 Southampton combines with Portsmouth to form a single metropolitan area; with a population of over a million this makes the region one of the United Kingdom's most populous metropolitan areas. The city's name is sometimes abbreviated in writing to "So'ton" or "Soton", and a resident of Southampton is called a Sotonian. Significant employers in Southampton include the University of Southampton, Southampton Solent University, Southampton Airport, the Ford Transit factory, Ordnance Survey, BBC South, the NHS, ABP and Carnival. Southampton
    10.00
    1 votes
    59
    Luanda

    Luanda

    • Railways terminating here: Luanda Railway
    Luanda, formerly named São Paulo da Assunção de Loanda, is the capital and largest city of Angola. Located on Angola's coast with the Atlantic Ocean, Luanda is both Angola's chief seaport and its administrative center. It has a metropolitan population of over 5 million. It is also the capital city of Luanda Province, and the world's third most populous Portuguese-speaking city, behind only São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, both in Brazil. The city is currently undergoing a major reconstruction, with many large developments taking place that will alter the cityscape significantly. Luanda was ranked the most expensive city to live in for expatriates by Mercer, in 2011, but was surpassed by Tokyo in 2012. Portuguese explorer Paulo Dias de Novais founded Luanda on 25 January 1576 as "São Paulo da Assumpção de Loanda", with a hundred families of settlers and four hundred soldiers. In 1618 the Portuguese built the fortress called Fortaleza São Pedro da Barra, and they subsequently built two more: Fortaleza de São Miguel (1634) and Forte de São Francisco do Penedo (1765-6). Of these, the Fortaleza de São Miguel is the best preserved. Luanda was Portugal's bridgehead from 1627, except during
    8.50
    2 votes
    60
    Menongue

    Menongue

    • Railways terminating here: Moçâmedes Railway
    Menongue is a town and municipality in Cuando Cubango Province in Angola. It is the current terminus of the southern railway from Namibe. After independence in 1975, MiG 23 aircraft from the nearby airbase launched air strikes against the SADF during the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale (1987–1988), a battle of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002).
    8.50
    2 votes
    61

    Newmarket West Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Newmarket West Train Station or Kingdon Street Train Station one of the two temporary stations serving the Newmarket area until the redevelopment of Newmarket Train Station is finished. It is located on the North Auckland Line and serviced by Western Line train services of the Auckland railway network.
    6.00
    4 votes
    62
    Puhinui Train Station

    Puhinui Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Puhinui Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland rail network. It has an island platform, an enclosed shelter relocated from Papatoetoe station. It is accessed from Puhinui Road on both sides of the tracks via a pedestrian bridge located at the site of a former level crossing (Puhinui Road itself now crosses on a bridge approximately 50m north of the pedestrian bridge).
    6.00
    4 votes
    63
    Mandurah

    Mandurah

    • Railways terminating here: Mandurah railway line, Perth
    Mandurah ( /ˈmændʒʉrɑː/, /ˈmændʒrə/ or /ˈmændʉrə/) is the second-largest city in Western Australia and is located approximately 72 kilometres (45 mi) south of the state capital, Perth. The city attracts a large number of tourists, including many international visitors. The city centre foreshore is home to a variety of wildlife including dolphins, pelicans, shags, and an abundance of marine life including the blue manna crab which has become synonymous with the area. The city is also known for its protected waterways, beaches and boating and fishing activities. Mandurah has grown from isolated holiday communities along the shores of the Peel-Harvey Estuary to a major regional city in just over a decade, in a similar vein to the Gold Coast in Eastern Australia, in recent times forming a conurbation with nearby Rockingham and the capital Perth along the coast. Mandurah has also become a popular lifestyle alternative for Perth retirees and its connection with the Perth CBD has been strengthened with the opening of the Perth-Mandurah railway line in December 2007 and a direct road connection to the Kwinana Freeway built by late 2010. A housing affordability survey of 227 cities in 2008
    7.00
    3 votes
    64
    Sintra

    Sintra

    • Railways terminating here:
    Sintra (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsĩtɾɐ]) is a town within the municipality of Sintra in the Grande Lisboa subregion (Lisbon Region) of Portugal. Owing to its 19th-century Romantic architecture and landscapes, it has become a major tourist centre, visited by many day-trippers who travel from the urbanized suburbs and capital of Lisbon. In addition to the Sintra Mountains and Sintra-Cascais Nature Park, the parishes of the town of Sintra are dotted by royal retreats, estates, castles and buildings from the 8th-9th century, in addition to many buildings completed between the 15th and 19th century, including the Castelo dos Mouros, the Pena National Palace and the Sintra National Palace, resulting in its classification by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1995. The earliest documents describe a built-up town in the 11th century by the Arab geographer Al-Bacr (who was later supported by the poets Luís de Camões and Lord Byron). The Moors built their castle atop a nearby promontory around the 8th-9th century. When Afonso Henriques finally captured Sintra (after the fall of Lisbon) in 1147, he ordered the construction of the Church of São Pedro de Canaferrim, within the castle walls.
    7.00
    3 votes
    65
    Malanje

    Malanje

    • Railways terminating here: Luanda Railway
    Malanje (also Malange) is the capital city of Malanje Province in Angola with a population of approximately 222,000. Nearby is the spectacular Calandula waterfalls, 85 km from the city. These falls are 105 metres high and their great width makes them the main tourist attraction in the region. It is a breathtaking sight. Pedras Negras de Pungo Andongo are massive black rocks. The greatest dam in the country is in Malanje, in the municipality of Capanda. The climate is mainly humid, with average temperatures between 20 and 24°C and rainfall 900 mm to 130 mm in the rainy season (October to April). Portuguese settlers founded Malanje in the 19th century. The construction of the railway from Luanda to Malanje, in the fertile highlands, started in 1885. The environs of Malanje included the principal cotton-producing area of Portuguese West Africa and drove its development since the beginning. The town developed in the mid-19th century as an important feira (open-air market) on Portuguese Angola's principal plateau, between Luanda — the territory's capital and largest city, 250 miles (400 km) to the west — and the Cuango valley, inhabited by Northern Mbundu peoples, 125 miles (200 km) to
    8.00
    2 votes
    66
    Morningside Train Station

    Morningside Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Morningside Railway Station is on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network. It has an island platform and is reached from a level crossing on Morningside Drive and by an underpass from New North Road. Transfers to bus services that pass the station can be made here:-
    8.00
    2 votes
    67
    Waterloo Interchange (Hutt Central) Railway Station

    Waterloo Interchange (Hutt Central) Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Waterloo Interchange railway station is a two-platform urban railway station in Waterloo, a suburb of the city of Lower Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. It is on the Wairarapa Line (formerly the Hutt Valley Branch), between Pohutukawa Street and Cambridge Terrace. Cambridge Terrace joins Eastern Hutt Road, the main thoroughfare for along the eastern side of the Hutt Valley. Waterloo is an important transit hub for Wainuiomata, as it is through this station that buses from Wainuiomata connects with the Hutt Valley. This station is served by Wairarapa Connection and Hutt Valley Line trains. The station is over the road from an ambulance station and shopping precinct, and is next to a bus depot. It is a few minutes' walk from a now closed fire station. Due to its status as an interchange, it is a point of convergence for several bus routes. Two major reasons were the impetus for the construction of the Hutt Valley Branch between Petone and Waterloo: first, the Petone Workshops had reached the end of their useful life; second, with increasing traffic demands on the line between Petone and Haywards and the lack of room to double-track the line on its existing
    8.00
    2 votes
    68

    Swanson Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Swanson Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network in the suburb of Swanson. It will be the westernmost and northernmost point of Auckland's electrified commuter network when electrification is completed.
    6.67
    3 votes
    69

    Yelverton

    • Railways terminating here: Princetown Railway
    Yelverton is a large village on the south-western edge of Dartmoor, Devon, in England. When the village's railway station (on the Great Western Railway (GWR) line from Plymouth to Tavistock) opened in the 19th century, the village became a popular residence for Plymouth commuters. The railway is now closed, but the Plym Valley Railway has reopened a section of it. Yelverton is well known for "the rock" - a prominent mass of stone close to the Plymouth road on the fringe of nearby Roborough Down. It gave its name to the Rock Hotel, built as a farm during the Elizabethan period, but converted in the 1850s to cater for growing tourism in the area. The area to the south and west of the roundabout at the centre of the village was settled in late Victorian and Edwardian times, with many grand and opulent villas. An area developed at about the same time on an odd shaped piece of land to the south of the Tavistock road is known as Leg o' Mutton Corner. At the beginning of the Second World War, an airfield (RAF Harrowbeer) was constructed at adjacent Harrowbeer as a fighter station for the air defence of Devonport Dockyard and the Western Approaches. A 19th century terrace of houses, then
    6.67
    3 votes
    70
    Birmingham

    Birmingham

    • Railways terminating here: Grand Junction Railway
    Birmingham (/ˈbɜrmɪŋəm/ BUR-ming-əm, locally /ˈbɜrmɪŋɡəm/ BUR-ming-gəm) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England. It is the most populous British city outside the capital London with 1,073,000 residents (2011 census), an increase of 96,000 over the previous decade. The city lies at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, the second most populous urban area in the United Kingdom with a population of 2,284,093 (2001 census). Its metropolitan area is also the United Kingdom's second most populous with 3,683,000 residents. A medium-sized market town during the medieval period, Birmingham grew to international prominence in the 18th century at the heart of the Midlands Enlightenment and subsequent Industrial Revolution, which saw the town at the forefront of worldwide developments in science, technology and economic organisation, producing a series of innovations that laid many of the foundations of modern industrial society. By 1791 it was being hailed as "the first manufacturing town in the world". Birmingham's distinctive economic profile, with thousands of small workshops practising a wide variety of specialised and highly-skilled trades, encouraged
    5.50
    4 votes
    71
    Carterton Railway Station

    Carterton Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Carterton Railway Station, in the Wairarapa district of New Zealand, is a single platform railway station in the town of Carterton. It is located at the corner of Cnr Broadway, Davy and Wheatstone Streets, near the main shopping precinct on State Highway 2 (SH 2). It is on the Wairarapa Line, three stops and 17 minutes' journey time to Masterton, eight stops and 1 hour 19 minutes journey time to Wellington, on Wairarapa Connection trains. This station retains its original station building (built in 1879-80), freight yard and loading bank, though freight is no longer accepted. A ticket office operates in the station building prior to the departure of commuter trains bound for Wellington. Heritage rolling stock is stored in the yard. The Carterton Railway Museum, operated from the station building by the Wairarapa Railway Restoration Society, is open every Sunday between 10am and 4pm. Construction of buildings for use by railway staff and the station itself was underway in May 1880, with the station master’s house (used initially as the resident engineer’s office), followed a month or two later by the station building. The first train to depart was a special goods train carrying a
    5.50
    4 votes
    72
    Hutt Park Railway Station, Gracefield

    Hutt Park Railway Station, Gracefield

    • Railways terminating here:
    Hutt Park railway station was on the Gracefield Branch line in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island, a terminus for passenger trains from Wellington. The station was behind the Hutt Park Raceway and opposite the Hutt Workshops. Services consisted exclusively of trains for patrons of race meetings of the Wellington Trotting Club at the Hutt Park Racecourse. Picnic trains were run occasionally to Woburn station for excursionists whose ultimate destination was the Hutt Park, who were conveyed by bus or walked to the park. There were two distinct eras of operation for the Hutt Park railway station. The first covered steam-hauled race trains until 1949, the second electric multiple units from 1960 to 1965. The site of the station was first used for race trains in 1927. The Wellington Trotting Club, which was holding four race meetings per year at the racecourse, had become concerned by reports that patrons had found it difficult to access the venue and sought to take advantage of the new Hutt Industrial Line (Gracefield Branch) that had been constructed to serve the new Hutt Workshops and ran behind the raceway. Since the cessation of race trains along the Hutt Park
    5.50
    4 votes
    73

    Pukekohe Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Pukekohe Train Station is the southern terminus of the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform between the main lines and an original wooden station building complete with signal panel. The Auckland - Wellington Overlander stops at Pukekohe. Opened in 1875, the station was formally known as The Pukekohe Railway Station And Post And Telegraph Office. The station is made of wood and iron, and contained a ladies' waiting room, public vestibule, railway and postal room, and porter's room. There was a large goods shed with a space of 1800 square feet. There were four sidings in connection with the station, and the staff consisted of the stationmaster, two cadets, a messenger, and a porter. Since 2000, the country town of Pukekohe has been the southern terminus for the Southern and Eastern Lines. However most suburban trains start or terminate at the former terminus at Papakura (18.2 km north of Pukekohe). Only selected services on normal working days start and terminate at Pukekohe and even then the majority of Pukekohe services run during peak hours. On public holidays and weekends there are no service to Pukekohe Station. Since August
    5.50
    4 votes
    74
    Antonito

    Antonito

    • Railways terminating here: Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad
    The Town of Antonito is a statutory town located in Conejos County, Colorado, United States. As of the 2000 census, the town's population was 873. According to the United States Census Bureau, Antonito has a total area of 0.4 square miles (1.0 km), all of it land. It is located at 37°4′39″N 106°0′34″W / 37.0775°N 106.00944°W / 37.0775; -106.00944 (37.077490, -106.009489), along U.S. Highway 285. Antonito is the southern terminus of the San Luis and Rio Grande Railroad and the eastern terminus of the steam powered, narrow gauge Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, which runs westwards to Osier, CO and Chama, NM. As of the census of 2000, there were 873 people, 357 households, and 234 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,212.3 people per square mile (864.3/km²). There were 396 housing units at an average density of 1,003.5 per square mile (392.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 61.40% White, 0.11% African American, 3.55% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 31.96% from other races, and 2.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 90.26% of the population. There were 357 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living
    9.00
    1 votes
    75

    Beijing East Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Beijing East Railway Station (simplified Chinese: 北京东站; traditional Chinese: 北京東站; pinyin: běi jīng dōng zhàn) is a railway station in Beijing. The station is located near Sihui. There are 3 passenger trains stop at the station every day:
    9.00
    1 votes
    76
    Beijing North Railway Station

    Beijing North Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Beijing North Railway Station (Chinese: 北京北站; pinyin: Běijīng Běi Zhàn), formerly known as Xizhimen Railway Station (simplified Chinese: 西直门站; traditional Chinese: 西直門車站; pinyin: Xīzhímén Zhàn), is a railway station in Beijing, China. It was built in 1905 as one of the original stations on the Jingzhang Railway, now part of the old Beijing-Baotou Line. Beijing North is now a small (Tier-III) station managed by the Beijing Railway Bureau, providing regular intercity train services to the north and northwest, including the Huhhot-Manzhouli Grasslands Express (K274/K275/K277). It is also the southern terminus for the S2 Line of the Beijing Suburban Railway. The station is located just outside of Xizhimen Station and accessible by Line 2, Line 4 and Line 13 of the Beijing Subway as well as numerous city bus lines.
    9.00
    1 votes
    77
    Boston Road Train Station

    Boston Road Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Boston Road Railway Station was on the Western Line of the Auckland Suburban Railway Network, near St Peter's College and Auckland Grammar School. The station was below State Highway 1, one of the busiest motorways in New Zealand. At the southern end of the station is the north western wall of Mt Eden Prison. The station closed on 10 April 2010, the day after the opening of the new Grafton station, and has since been largely demolished. Until the station itself was double-tracked to Mt Eden in 2005, morning trains ran on the right through the loop and afternoon trains on the left, avoiding the need for St Peter's and Grammar pupils to cross the line. ONTRACK reconstructed two road bridges just to the east of the station to allow double-tracking in the section towards Newmarket Train Station, and to prepare for electrification. As part of the project, the train station shifted several hundred meters to the northeast, between Park Road and Khyber Pass Road, where a new bus / train station was built. The station was renamed the Grafton station. This station is able to better serve the Central Connector and sites like the Auckland Hospital and the future development on the Lion Brewery
    9.00
    1 votes
    78
    Dunedin Railway Station

    Dunedin Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Dunedin Railway Station is located in Dunedin, in New Zealand's South Island. Designed by George Troup, the station is the fourth building to have served as Dunedin's railway station. It earned its architect the nickname of "Gingerbread George". Dunedin was linked to Christchurch by rail in 1878, with a link south to Invercargill completed the following year, and the first railway workshops were opened at Hillside in South Dunedin as early as 1875. Early plans were for a grand main station on Cumberland Street, but these never got any further than the laying of a foundation. Instead, a simple weatherboard-constructed station was built next to the site in 1884, though this was only ever intended to be a temporary structure. It took close to 20 years for government funding to be allocated to the new structure, and planning for the new station only really commenced as the 19th century was drawing to a close. The logistics of constructing what would be (for a time) New Zealand's busiest railway station took three years before construction finally began in 1903. Dunedin, at the time a major commercial hub, required a station suitable to a wide range of activities: it was a commercial
    9.00
    1 votes
    79
    Lobito

    Lobito

    • Railways terminating here: Benguela railway
    Lobito is a town and municipality in Benguela Province in Angola. It is located on the Atlantic Coast north of Catumbela Estuary. It dates from 1905 and owes its existence to the bay of the same name having been chosen as the sea terminus of the Benguela railway to the far interior, passing through Luau to Katanga in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The city is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. The population is about 207,957 (2005). Lobito, was built on a sandspit and reclaimed land, with one of Africa’s finest natural harbours, protected by a 5 km long sandspit. The old council (concelho) was created in 1843 by the Portuguese administration. The town was also founded in 1843 by order of Maria II of Portugal, and its harbour works were begun in 1903. Large developments, however, were not stimulated until the completion in 1928 of the important Benguela Railway, which connected Portuguese Angola with the Belgian Congo. Under Portuguese rule, the port was one of Angola’s busiest, exporting agricultural produce from the interior and handling transit trade from the mines of southeastern Belgian Congo and of Zambia. Fishing, tourism and services were also important. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    80
    Newman Railway Station

    Newman Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Newman railway station was a station on the Wairarapa Line in the Wairarapa region of New Zealand’s North Island. It served the small rural community of Newman, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) north of Eketahuna. It is accessed via Cliff Road, but is now located on private property. The crossing of the Makakahi River by the Wellington – Woodville railway in December 1894 enabled the establishment of a station at Newman. The station was initially freight-only, while passenger trains continued to terminate at nearby Eketahuna as it was the nearest station with passenger accommodations. After the railway reached Eketahuna in 1889, local timber merchant Tom Price established a sawmill at Newman, named Albion Mill. At first, the timber was transported by cart to Eketahuna to be shipped out, but this caused problems with the local council when inclement weather caused his carts to damage the roads. Therefore, when Newman station was established, a siding was laid north of the station to his mill at the township of Newman. Until the mill closed in March 1900, it provided a significant source of traffic for the station. Price’s operations were responsible for 1,000,000 cubic metres (35,000,000
    9.00
    1 votes
    81
    Henderson Train Station

    Henderson Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Henderson Train Station is a major station on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. It is near the town centre of Henderson and the new Council offices, as well as a major shopping centre, Westfield WestCity. A major upgrade of the station was completed on 24 October 2006. The new station opened on 2 November 2006, 125 years after the railway first reached Henderson. The new station has an island platform and a new enclosed glass footbridge connecting it to Henderson mall and the Waitakere City Council office buildings. It was proposed that the station be renamed Waitakere Central when it was upgraded because it is integrated with the Waitakere City Council's new Civic Building. Some people said that the name should be left as it is since it is the name of the local area. It was claimed that there would be confusion with Waitakere, the terminus of most Western Line services. Due to opposition to the name change, the station has Waitakere Central only as a subtitle.
    6.33
    3 votes
    82
    Johnsonville Railway Station

    Johnsonville Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Johnsonville railway station is the terminus of the Johnsonville Line, one of eight stations on the commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island. It serves the suburb of Johnsonville, and as a bus interchange attracts traffic from other suburbs to the north and east. The station is beside Johnsonville Mall, a major regional shopping centre, which incorporates a Countdown supermarket. Numerous other businesses and organisations are nearby in a busy retail and commercial area. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro as part of the Metlink network to and from Wellington. The original Johnsonville station was constructed by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company and was completed in 1883 though it was not used until the commencement of services on 24 September 1885 with the station having been officially opened along with the Wellington to Paremata section of the line on the 21st. Johnsonville was one of three stations built by the WMR on the section of the Wellington – Manawatu Line that now the Johnsonville Line. It remained a through station following government purchase of the line and its incorporation into the North Island Main
    6.33
    3 votes
    83
    Petone Train Station

    Petone Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Petone railway station is a dual platform, suburban railway station serving Petone, a suburb of Hutt City in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. Facilities at this station include a bus terminal, carpark, ticket office, and cycle storage. Pedestrian access between the two side platforms is by way of either a subway or a footbridge. This station is served by Melling Line, Hutt Valley Line and Wairarapa Connection trains. Trains are operated by Tranz Metro using the Metlink brand. It is the last station on the Wairarapa Line before its junction with the Melling Branch. Petone Station is sited on the first section of the Wairarapa Line which opened between Wellington and Western Hutt (née Lower Hutt) on 14 April 1874. Despite this line running through what was to become Petone, it was not until the following year that a station was opened there. Petone was first served with a railway station when, in June 1875, a flag station was opened near the Korokoro Stream which is just north of the present day road overbridge. It was named Koro-Koro as was the locality at the time. In about 1879 a new station was established at Petone near the present station site to replace the
    6.33
    3 votes
    84
    Princetown

    Princetown

    • Railways terminating here: Princetown Railway
    Princetown is a town situated on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. In 1785, Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt, Secretary to the Prince of Wales, leased a large area of moorland from the Duchy of Cornwall estate, hoping to convert it into good farmland. He encouraged people to live in the area and suggested that a prison be built there. He called the settlement Princetown after the Prince of Wales. Princetown is best known as the site of Dartmoor Prison. It is the highest town on the moor, and one of the highest in the United Kingdom. The Princetown Railway, closed in 1956, was also the highest railway line in England, its Princetown terminus being 435 metres (1,427 ft) above sea level. In 1780, a farm was reclaimed on the site of an ancient tenement near the Two Bridges, and in 1785, Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt set about improving the moor at a place which he named Tor Royal, about 1 km (0.62 mi) south-east of Princetown. He made an estate and built a house in 1798. Later the road from Tavistock to Princetown was built, as well as the other roads that now cross the Moor. He also proposed that a prison be built on Dartmoor to house the thousands of captives of the Napoleonic Wars and the later War
    6.33
    3 votes
    85
    Saint Petersburg

    Saint Petersburg

    • Railways terminating here: Trans-Siberian Railway
    Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербург, tr. Sankt-Peterburg; IPA: [sankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is a city and a federal subject (a federal city) of Russia located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. In 1914 the name of the city was changed to Petrograd (Russian: Петроград; IPA: [pʲɪtrɐˈgrat]), in 1924 to Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград; IPA: [lʲɪnʲɪnˈgrat]) and in 1991 back to Saint Petersburg. In Russian literature, informal documents, and discourse, the "Saint" (Санкт-) is usually omitted, leaving Petersburg (Петербург, Peterburg). In common parlance Russians may drop "-burg" (-бург) as well, leaving only Peter (Питер, Russian: [ˈpʲitʲɪr]). Saint Petersburg was founded by Tsar Peter the Great on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703. From 1713 to 1728 and from 1732 to 1918, Saint Petersburg was the Imperial capital of Russia. In 1918 the central government bodies moved from Saint Petersburg (then named Petrograd) to Moscow. It is Russia's second largest city after Moscow with almost 5 million inhabitants. Saint Petersburg is a major European cultural center, and also an important Russian port on the Baltic Sea. Saint Petersburg is often described as the
    6.33
    3 votes
    86
    Strabane

    Strabane

    • Railways terminating here: Strabane and Letterkenny Railway
    Strabane ( /strəˈbæn/ strə-BAN; from Irish: An Srath Bán, meaning "the white strath"), historically spelt Straban, is a town in west County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It contains the headquarters of Strabane District Council. Strabane has a population of around 20,000 and is the second-largest town in Tyrone, after Omagh. It lies on the east bank of the River Foyle and is roughly equidistant from Omagh, Derry and Letterkenny. The Foyle marks the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. On the other side of the river (across Lifford Bridge) is the smaller town of Lifford, which is the county town of County Donegal. The River Mourne flows through the centre of the town, and meets the River Finn to form the Foyle. Strabane suffered huge economic damage in 1987 when much of the centre of the town was flooded. Strabane is twinned with Zeulenroda in the state of Thuringia, Germany. Strabane once had the dubious distinction of the highest unemployment rate in the Industrial World, during the height of The Troubles. It is one of the most economically deprived towns in the United Kingdom. In August 2005, a Channel 4 television programme presented by property experts
    6.33
    3 votes
    87

    Glen Innes Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Glen Innes Train Station is located on the Eastern Line of the Auckland Railway Network. It has an island platform layout. Every hour it has two services towards Papakura and two towards Britomart (Auckland). In 2006 the station had a major upgrade and is one of the most used non-terminus stations by the public.
    7.50
    2 votes
    88
    Penrose Train Station

    Penrose Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Penrose Station is a station in Penrose, Auckland City, on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform and is reached by an over bridge from Station Road and Great South Road. It still has its original wooden station building on the platform. There is also an additional platform serving the Onehunga Line along Station Road. Passengers transferring between Southern Line and Onehunga Line services must use the over bridge to continue their journey. In April 2011, the island platform was lengthened to accommodate longer suburban passenger trains, by raising the height of the platform around the old station building. On April 28, 2011, passenger trains started to stop under the station building shelter for the first time since 1993. Penrose station is near Mt Smart Stadium, a major sports stadium. Penrose is at the junction of the Onehunga Branch line with the North Auckland Line.
    7.50
    2 votes
    89
    Summit Railway Station

    Summit Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Summit railway station was at the summit of the Wairarapa Line over the Rimutaka Ranges in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island and was where trains were marshalled for a descent down the Incline or for Fell locomotives to be extricated from a train that had ascended the Incline. It did not have a platform or other passenger facilities, did not consign goods or otherwise serve any settlement save for the railway staff based there. It did not have road access at any time during its operation. Construction of Summit station was covered by the Summit Contract. Seven tenders were submitted for the work, with the contract being let to Messrs. Collie, Scott and Wilkinson for the sum of £18,701. It was expected that the contract would be completed between 12 July 1874 and 22 July 1876, and covered the station yard, drainage works and Summit Tunnel. The yard was formed by cutting a terrace into the hillside, with the excavated fill being dumped on the opposite side of the yard. Further ground was levelled in the hillside above the yard on which houses were built. Over time, further ground was filled in on which to extend the yard and tracks. Once the yard had taken shape,
    7.50
    2 votes
    90
    Waingawa Railway Station

    Waingawa Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Waingawa railway station is a station on the Wairarapa Line in the Wairarapa district of New Zealand’s North Island. It is located about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) south of the Waingawa River and is situated in a heavy industrial area. It served passenger trains until 1992 and now only handles freight (private sidings and special consignments). The first use of the name Waingawa in relation to rail facilities in the Wairarapa was when from 1895 a siding about 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Kurupuni (Solway) became known as Waingawa. It was a private siding that had for a long time been known as Donald’s Siding, and was used by the Wellington Meat Export Company to load livestock for transport to their abattoir at Ngahauranga. Between 1908 and 1912 the Wellington Farmers’ Meat Company established their own private siding about 45 chains (3,000 ft; 910 m) south of Waingawa called Taratahi. In 1921 this became the location of a new station called Waingawa, complete with signalling apparatus, and the name Taratahi ceased to be used. Though a co-operative freezing works was established at Waingawa in 1897, the brisk traffic in livestock from Waingawa to Wellington continued, at least until the
    7.50
    2 votes
    91

    Hope Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Hope railway station was a rural railway station serving the small town of Hope in the Tasman district of New Zealand’s South Island. Hope is located on State Highway 6 between the larger towns of Richmond, to the north, and Brightwater, to the south. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and existed from 1876 to 1955. Facilities at this station included a small wooden passenger shelter, goods shed and siding. The first section of the Nelson Section to be built was from Stoke to Foxhill, as the route for this part of the line was the first to be confirmed while the route out of Nelson was still being debated. This included the construction of the Hope railway station, which was opened along with the first completed section from Nelson to Foxhill on 29 January 1876. Hope was one of seven stations on the Nelson Section between Nelson and Belgrove to have a goods shed, and came to the attention of the Nelson Progress League in 1949 because of the condition of the goods shed. The League was, at the time, conducting a campaign to encourage government investment in the line, and cited Hope as an example of the dilapidated state of the railway. The goods shed was later
    7.00
    2 votes
    92
    Pigeon Bush Railway Station

    Pigeon Bush Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Pigeon Bush railway station was a single platform, rural railway station in an area of the South Wairarapa district known as Pigeon Bush, about 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) south-west of Featherston, in New Zealand’s North Island. During work on the Incline Contract, land was taken just north-east of Lucena’s Creek (known today as Owhanga Stream) for a road diversion around what was to become the yard for a station identified on plans as Lucena’s. By the time the station was opened in 1878, its name had been changed to Pigeon Bush. It had a passenger platform and shelter shed, loading bank, and crossing loop. The chief traffic through this station was sheep, but its main purpose was to provide a crossing point for trains. H class Fell locomotives were used occasionally to bank trains from Pigeon Bush to Cross Creek until about 1943. The station was fully signalled in 1922. As a result of the derailing of a mixed train that had just departed Pigeon Bush for Featherston on 19 January 1888 due to severe wind gusts, windbreak fences and rows of willow trees were erected along the length of line most prone to the wind. However, on 9 October 1936, the Wairarapa railcar Mamari was overturned by
    7.00
    2 votes
    93
    Takapu Road Railway Station

    Takapu Road Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Takapu Road Railway Station is on the suburban rail network of Wellington, New Zealand, on the North Island Main Trunk Railway (NIMT). It is double tracked with side platforms. It serves the suburbs of Redwood and Grenada North. Takapu Road is served by Kapiti Line commuter trains operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand every 30 minutes off-peak, and more frequently during peak periods. Some peak services run express between Porirua and Wellington and do not stop at Takapu Road. They are operated by electric multiple units, formerly DM/D class but now almost always EM/ET class. Two diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Capital Connection and the Overlander, both pass through the station but do not stop. Takapu Road is one of only two stations on the Kapiti Line not on track built by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR); the other is Redwood immediately to the north. The WMR built the original route of the NIMT between Wellington and Longburn and it was purchased by the New Zealand Railways Department (NZR) in December 1908. The original route between Wellington and Porirua, via Johnsonville and now truncated to the Johnsonville Line, was bypassed in the 1930s by
    7.00
    2 votes
    94
    Witton Park

    Witton Park

    • Railways terminating here: Stockton and Darlington Railway
    Witton Park is a village in County Durham, in England. It is situated to the west of Bishop Auckland.
    7.00
    2 votes
    95

    Fruitvale Road Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Fruitvale Road Railway Station is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. It is near local schools, including two major high schools. In 2006/2007, the station was closed over summer to be upgraded, and lengthened for 6-car trains. It is named after a nearby road. The road is not very well known, thus new passengers will most likely have no idea which suburb this station serves. It has been proposed to rename it 'Kelston' since it is in that suburb. It is quite close to Kelston Shopping Centre, Kelston Girls' High School and Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
    8.00
    1 votes
    96
    Greytown Railway Station

    Greytown Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Greytown railway station was the terminus of the Greytown Branch railway, which connected the Wairarapa town of Greytown in New Zealand’s North Island to Woodside on the Wairarapa Line. In 1878, parliament authorised the construction of the Greytown Branch, and the following year, after the completion of a survey, plans were drawn up and tenders called. The contract for the construction of the Greytown station building, goods shed and locomotive shed was let to Ebenezer Gray for £1183. Construction was completed on time. The opening of the line on 14 May 1880 was to have been a grand affair, with a parade led by a brass band, followed by local charitable societies, school children and the general public. These festivities were to have been followed by sporting events including teams from Wellington and Greytown. Foul weather on the day meant that much of what had been planned was cancelled, and the first train from Wellington brought with it few visitors. Until the opening to Masterton on 1 November 1880, Greytown was the effective northern terminus of the Wairarapa Line. The Greytown to Woodside section then became a branch railway. With the closure of the Greytown Branch in 1953,
    8.00
    1 votes
    97

    Orakei Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Orakei Train Station in the Auckland suburb of Orakei is located on the Eastern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform layout and can be reached by an overbridge from Orakei Road. It is backed by a carpark and a shopping complex. The Redwood development group is currently (2008) planning to redevelop the area around the train station substantially. A plan with several skyscraper-style apartment buildings (and in turn providing substantial green space and waterfront access to the public) did meet with substantial local protest. A more scaled-back plan was then proposed which limits the buildings to six storeys and is currently being discussed. It would retain public access and amenities, and also provide a covered new train station.
    8.00
    1 votes
    98
    Tawa Railway Station

    Tawa Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Tawa Railway Station, originally called Tawa Flat, is on the North Island Main Trunk Railway (NIMT) and is part of the suburban rail network of Wellington, New Zealand. It is double tracked with an island platform, and is 13.75 kilometres (8.54 mi) from Wellington Railway Station, the southern terminus of the NIMT. Tawa is served by Metlink Kapiti Line commuter trains operated by Tranz Metro. Trains run every 30 minutes off-peak, and more frequently during peak periods. A number of peak services run express between Porirua and Wellington and do not stop at Tawa. The commuter trains are operated by electric multiple units. These were formerly DM/D class units but are now EM/ET class or Matangi units. Two diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Capital Connection and the Overlander, pass through the station but do not stop. The original line through Tawa was built by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR) and the station opened on 24 September 1885. At this time, the railway followed a circuitous route via Johnsonville to reach Wellington, and Tawa was 16.48 km from the terminus. The original station was a flag stop near the junction of Duncan Street and Tawa Street close to
    8.00
    1 votes
    99
    Beijing Railway Station

    Beijing Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Beijing Railway Station (Chinese: 北京站; pinyin: Běijīng Zhàn) is one of Beijing's railway stations, opened in the 1950s, as can be seen from its architecture (which merges traditional architecture with 50s-design). It is located in the city's central location, just next to Jianguomen, and is within the confines of the city's 2nd Ring Road. Trains enter and leave to the scenery of a former Beijing city gate at Dongbianmen. The traffic load of Beijing Railway Station has decreased somewhat with the opening of the Beijing West Railway Station in 1996. Still, it remains a busy railway station. Generally, trains for Manchuria (including Harbin, Shenyang and Dalian), Shandong (including Qingdao, Jinan), Eastern Seaboard (including Shanghai, Nanjing and Hangzhou) as well as for Inner and Outer Mongolia depart from this station. The remainder depart from Beijing West. Some international lines (notably the railway line linking Beijing to Pyongyang, North Korea (DPRK), amongst others), also depart from this station. The Beijing Subway system used to terminate at Beijing Railway Station back in the 1960s and 1970s. This underground station still exists to this day, and forms part of the Line 2
    5.67
    3 votes
    100
    Epuni Railway Station

    Epuni Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Epuni railway station is an island platform urban railway station in Epuni, a suburb of the city of Lower Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand's North Island. It is on the Wairarapa Line (formerly the Hutt Valley Branch). The then Hutt Valley Branch to Waterloo opened on 26 May 1927. The branch line was extended to Epuni and Naenae on 7 January 1946 and to Taita on 14 April 1947. Double track was to Naenae only but was extended to Taita on 22 February 1953. With the opening of the section to Haywards (now called Manor Park) from 1 March 1954 and the closing of the Melling-Haywards section, this route became the main route to Upper Hutt and the Wairarapa. The station was closed temporarily on 15 May 2008 due to the possible presence of asbestos. TranzMetro subsequently announced that they would replace the original station with a glass shelter and improved lighting. The station reopened on the Tuesday 12 August 2008 will limited shelter area. On Good Friday 10 April 2009, the wooden section of the original station building was demolished leaving on the concrete Cross-Tie Electric Traction equipment building and subway entrances remaining, Over the course of the Easter
    6.50
    2 votes
    101

    Freezing Works Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    The Nelson Freezing Company’s works between Stoke and Richmond in the Tasman district of New Zealand’s South Island were a major source of traffic for the Nelson Section from 1909 to 1955. This was a freight-only station, with no passenger facilities ever being located at this site. Facilities at this station included a twenty-three wagon loop, stockyards, an unloading ramp and a private siding that ended beside the freezer chamber. The Nelson Freezing Company constructed its freezing works beside the railway (which was between the Waimea Inlet and the works) and in April 1909 shipped its first load of frozen mutton carcases the 7 miles (11 km) to the port in three trains of 6 insulated wagons to be loaded on the refrigerated ship SS Rakaia. This allowed for one train to be loading at the works, one to be unloading at the port, and the other to be in transit. Much of the livestock that supplied the works was transported in via the railway from farms to the south. For around three decades, an average of 30,000 head of livestock per annum were transported to the works, though this could fluctuate significantly from one year to the next. The livestock trade on the Nelson Section,
    6.50
    2 votes
    102
    Hastings railway station

    Hastings railway station

    • Railways terminating here: East Coastway Line
    Hastings railway station is in Hastings in East Sussex, England. It is situated on the Hastings Line to Tunbridge Wells, the East Coastway Line to Brighton and the Marshlink Line to Ashford International. It was formerly operated by the South Eastern Railway and the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway and was the scene of bitter rivalry between those companies. The first train arrived at Hastings station in 1851 and with it began Hastings’ heyday. The station was originally V-shaped allowing the two railway companies to have separate platforms and booking areas: one side for SER trains to pass through and the other as a terminal for LBSCR services. The whole station was reconstructed in a neo-Georgian style in 1931 and only the goods shed remained unchanged. All trains now ran through the two new island platforms and a huge central booking hall welcomed travellers. The station building was re-built in 2004, with the neo-Georgian booking hall demolished and replaced with a modernist building. The southernmost loop platform has been curtailed into an Ashford facing bay. The station contains a small police post manned by British Transport Police, although this is a satellite of
    6.50
    2 votes
    103
    Khandallah Railway Station

    Khandallah Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Khandallah railway station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Line, a commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island. The station was erected and operated by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR) on their line from Wellington to Longburn. From the acquisition of the WMR by the New Zealand Railways Department in 1908 until the opening of the Tawa Flat deviation in 1937, the station was on the North Island Main Trunk Railway. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). Khandallah was one of three stations constructed by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company on what is now known as the Johnsonville Branch. It was opened on 21 September 1885 along with the first section of the company’s line between Wellington and Paramata. Timetabled services began several days later on the 24th. As originally constructed by the WMR, the "flag" station had a single side platform, a small wooden passenger shelter, and a crossing loop. Later, after the government assumed control of the line, the station had a
    6.50
    2 votes
    104
    Beijing South Railway Station

    Beijing South Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    The current Beijing South Railway Station (Chinese: 北京南站; pinyin: Běijīng Nán Zhàn) is a large railway station on the south side of Beijing that opened on August 1, 2008. The new station replaced the old Beijing South Station, first known as the Majiapu Railway Station and later known as the Yongdingmen Railway Station before 1988, which stood 500 m away and operated from 1897 to 2006. The new Beijing South Station, is the second largest in Asia,after Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station,and joins the Beijing Railway Station and the Beijing West Railway Station as the third major passenger rail hub in the Chinese capital. It serves as the terminus for high-speed trains to the city, including the Beijing–Tianjin Intercity Rail, which can reach speeds above 350 km/h. The terminus occupies a 32 hectare site in Fengtai. The enormous oval-shaped station was designed by the British architect firm of Terry Farrell and Partners in collaboration with the Tianjin Design Institute. It was built from more than 60,000 tons of steel and 490,000 cubic meters of concrete by 4,000 workers in less than three years. The glass ceiling is outfitted with 3,246 solar panels to generate electricity. The
    6.00
    2 votes
    105
    Crofton Downs Train Station

    Crofton Downs Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Crofton Downs railway station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island. It serves the suburbs of Crofton Downs and Chartwell. Its name is similar to, and should not be confused with, the original name for Ngaio station (Crofton). Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). The station is one of four on the line which is on a curve. Crofton Downs is the most recent station on the Johnsonville Branch, having been opened in 1963 to serve the then new suburb of Crofton Downs. Patronage of the station was light in its early years, not becoming popular until housing in the area was well developed. Trains run in both directions through this station, departing at half-hourly intervals, supplemented by a 13/13/26 schedule at peak times on week days. There are no bus services that connect with this station. This station has a single side platform, passenger shelter, and commuter car park. Behind the station is a Mitre-10 hardware store and customer car park.
    6.00
    2 votes
    106
    Curzon Street railway station

    Curzon Street railway station

    • Railways terminating here: London and Birmingham Railway
    Birmingham Curzon Street railway station (formerly Birmingham station) was a railway station in Birmingham, England, used by scheduled passenger trains between 1838 and 1854 when it was the terminus for both the London and Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway, with lines to London and to Manchester and Liverpool respectively. It was then used for excursions until 1893 and goods traffic until 1966 when it closed. More recently, the surviving Grade I listed entrance building has been used for occasional art events. In 2010, a new Curzon Street station, partly on the site of the historical station, was proposed as the Birmingham terminus for High Speed 2. The station was opened in 1838, with the first train from London to Birmingham arriving on 17 September. It was the terminus for both the London and Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway and the companies had adjacent, parallel platforms but there were no through trains. It was inconveniently located on the eastern edge of Birmingham city centre and its use as a passenger station was short lived following the merging of the two companies into the London and North Western Railway in 1846. The smaller Lawley
    6.00
    2 votes
    107
    New Lynn Train Station

    New Lynn Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    New Lynn Train Station is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network, New Zealand, and is part of an integrated transport centre where transfers can be made to and from bus services. A redeveloped station in a new rail trench was opened on 25 September 2010. LynnMall, a major shopping mall, is close by. In the late 2000s, local and regional government, as part of the revitalising of the regional rail commuter network, decided to build a new "feature station" at New Lynn, which included sinking the tracks and station into a trench. Road was grade-separated from rail to enable vehicle traffic to pass over the line. Before the trenching works, the level crossings in the town centre were often blocked by passing trains, leading to substantial congestion, which would have only increased with more train services. The new rail trench and associated sunken station were to be constructed with up to 16m deep diaphragm walls using specially imported cranes and specialists. This was required due to the unstable, water-logged soils and the need to avoid settlement damage to close-by buildings. The procedure to construct the 1 km of trench (with finished depth of up to 8m) involved
    6.00
    2 votes
    108
    Baldwin Ave Train Station

    Baldwin Ave Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Baldwin Ave Train Station, in the suburb of Mount Albert, is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. It has offset side platforms connected by a level crossing.
    7.00
    1 votes
    109
    Bristol Temple Meads railway station

    Bristol Temple Meads railway station

    • Railways terminating here: Great Western Main Line
    Bristol Temple Meads railway station is the oldest and largest railway station in Bristol, England. It is an important transport hub for public transport in Bristol, with bus services to various parts of the city and surrounding districts, and a ferry service to the city centre in addition to the train services. Bristol's other main-line station, Bristol Parkway, is on the northern outskirts of the Bristol conurbation. It opened on 31 August 1840 as the western terminus of the Great Western Railway from London Paddington station. The whole railway including Temple Meads was the first one designed by the British engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Soon the station was also used by the Bristol and Exeter Railway, the Bristol and Gloucester Railway, the Bristol Harbour Railway and the Bristol and South Wales Union Railway. To accommodate the increasing number of trains the station was expanded in the 1870s by Francis Fox; and again in the 1930s by P E Culverhouse. Brunel's terminus is no longer part of the operational station. The historical significance of the station has been noted, and most of the site is Grade 1 listed. Temple Meads is now owned by Network Rail and is operated
    7.00
    1 votes
    110
    Ennis

    Ennis

    • Railways terminating here: West Clare Railway
    Ennis (Irish: Inis, meaning "island") is the county town of County Clare in Ireland. Situated on the River Fergus, just north of where it flows into the Shannon Estuary, it lies north west of Limerick and south of Galway. The town is also 19 km (12 mi) from Shannon and Shannon Airport. Its name is a shortening of the original Inis Cluain Ramh Fhada ("island of the long rowing meadow"). It is now a gateway to the West of Clare via the N85 Western relief road for people travelling from the Limerick and East Clare regions. The 2011 census indicates that Ennis had a population of 25,360 making it the largest town in Munster and the sixth largest town in Ireland. It is the 11th largest urban centre in the country. In 2005 Ennis won the Irish Tidy Towns Competition. The town has maintained this high status over the years coming 2nd in 2008 and 2009, an improvement over the previous years. The name Ennis comes from the Irish word "Inis", meaning "island". This name relates to an island formed between two courses of the River Fergus on which the Franciscan Abbey was built. The past of Ennis is greatly associated with the O'Brien family, who were descendants of Brian Boru. During the 12th
    7.00
    1 votes
    111
    Featherston Railway Station

    Featherston Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Featherston railway station is a single-platform, urban railway station serving the town of Featherston in the Wairarapa district of New Zealand. The station lies on the Wairarapa Line, and is located between Harrison Street West and Harrison Street East. It is thirty five minutes journey time to Masterton, or fifty five minutes journey time to Wellington. This station also serves a larger area of the South Wairarapa district, in particular the residents of Martinborough, as it is the closest station to several settlements outside of Featherston. The station building houses a ticket office from which fares for the Wairarapa Connection service are sold. Goods have not been consigned from Featherston since 1986. Formation work on the line reached Featherston on 17 August 1878, with platelaying completed the following month in September. Though the first train reached Featherston in late September, it was not until 16 October that the railway was opened for public use. Featherston was initially a station of some importance, being the railhead for two years until the opening of the line through to Masterton. It was opened with a seven room station building, a 60-by-30-foot (18 × 9.1 m)
    7.00
    1 votes
    112
    Pahiatua Railway Station

    Pahiatua Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Pahiatua railway station is a station on the Wairarapa Line, a railway line that runs through the Wairarapa region of New Zealand’s North Island. It was opened in May 1897, shortly before the line was completed and opened to Woodville in December of that year. The station is actually located 1.7 kilometres (1.1 mi) out of Pahiatua, the town it was built to serve, in contrast to the original plans for the railway line to run through the town. As Pahiatua is one of the more significant towns in the northern Wairarapa, the station was for many years one of the few staffed stations on the northern section of the line. Though passenger traffic ceased in 1988, the station continues to be the source of freight traffic thanks to the neighbouring dairy factory, and it is also the home of the Pahiatua Railcar Society. When the station opened, Pahiatua was served by mixed trains that had already been providing services to stations further south on those sections of the line that were opened as the railway line made its way north. These trains provided the only passenger services to Pahiatua for the few months it took to complete the line through to Woodville. At the time the Wairarapa Line
    7.00
    1 votes
    113
    Silverton

    Silverton

    • Railways terminating here: Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad
    The town of Silverton is a Statutory Town that is the county seat of, and the only incorporated municipality in San Juan County, Colorado, United States. Silverton is a former silver mining camp, most or all of which is now included in a federally designated National Historic Landmark District, the Silverton Historic District. The town population was 531 at U.S. Census 2000. Silverton is linked to Durango by the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, a National Historic Landmark. Silverton no longer has active mining, but subsists by tourism, maintenance of US 550 (which links Montrose with Durango via Silverton), mine pollution remediation, and retirees. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km), all of it land. Silverton is one of the highest towns in the United States, at 9,305 feet (2,836 m) above sea level. As of the census of 2000, there were 531 people, 255 households, and 149 families residing in the town. The population density was 656.0 people per square mile (253.1/km²). There were 430 housing units at an average density of 531.2 per square mile (205.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.36% White,
    7.00
    1 votes
    114
    Westfield Train Station

    Westfield Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Westfield Train Station is located on the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland Railway Network. It is near Westfield Junction, which is the junction of the Eastern and Southern Lines. It has an island platform layout and can be reached from a pedestrian overbridge at the end of Portage Road. The overbridge also spans the adjacent Westfield marshalling yards and gives access to KiwiRail's operations centre and locomotive facility. This station has one of the lowest patronage of any station on the Auckland network, in part due to the decrepit nature of its facilities and its remote location, far from any main centres. The shelter structure is in poor condition yet still provides some protection from the driving wind and rain which comes off the Manukau Harbour. In April 2010 the shelter was torn down, and replaced with shelters formerly used at the temporary Newmarket stations. When rail services are disrupted south of Otahuhu station, passengers leave trains at this station to board alternative transport; either later trains, or bus alternatives.
    7.00
    1 votes
    115
    Avondale Train Station

    Avondale Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Avondale Railway Station is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. The proposed Avondale–Southdown Line would connect to the Western Line just east of the station. Until 26 December 2008 it had an island platform just west of Blockhouse Bay Road, reached via a footbridge off the road. In 2010 an upgraded station was built on Layard Street, north of the St Jude Street level crossing and approximately 100m west and 200m south of the old station. The new station provides better connections with the Avondale town centre and the platform is on a straight section of track, unlike the old platform which was on a large sharp curve. This station has number of bus routes pass through Rosebank Rd and Blockhouse Bay Rd for passengers to transfer:
    5.00
    3 votes
    116
    Kaitoke Railway Station

    Kaitoke Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Kaitoke railway station was a single-platform rural railway station on the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and Featherston in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. Initially it was the railhead of the Wairarapa Line, at a point where the railway met the main road between Upper Hutt and the Wairarapa. Later it was a point at which locomotives were changed, steam engines were watered, trains could cross, and passengers could make use of the refreshment room. The station was closed along with the old route via the Rimutaka Incline on which the Fell system was used over the Rimutaka Ranges when the Rimutaka Deviation opened in 1955. The Mungaroa Contract for the construction of the Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and the Pakuratahi Valley included a station near the terminus of the contract, originally called Pakuratahi Station. The contractor for this section was Charles McKirdy, who was to have completed the contract between 3 June 1874 and 3 March 1876 but, as was common with contracts for the construction of the Wairarapa Line, work was not completed on time. Having run out of money with two months of work left to complete, the contract was picked up by McKirdy’s
    5.00
    3 votes
    117
    Maymorn Railway Station

    Maymorn Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Maymorn railway station is a twin platform, rural railway station serving the small settlement of Maymorn on the Maymorn Plateau, east of Upper Hutt, in New Zealand’s North Island. It is served by the Wairarapa Connection, and sees five services each way Monday to Thursday, six on Friday and two on Saturday and Sunday. This station was initially known as Mangaroa and received its present name on 26 January 1959. This station officially opened on 3 November 1955 along with the Rimutaka Deviation and Rimutaka Tunnel. The ground on which the station is located was created using fill extracted during the construction of the Rimutaka Tunnel. During construction of the tunnel, a crossing loop long enough to accommodate 116 wagons and a temporary connection to the now closed section of the Wairarapa Line were built to enable work trains to bring in materials and supplies. The connection between the old and new lines was lifted along with the old line, but the loop remained in use for many years afterwards for operational reasons. Northbound (up) passenger services used the loop and second platform, while southbound (down) passenger services used the main line and first platform. Both
    4.67
    3 votes
    118

    Remuera Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Remuera Train Station is located on the Southern Line of the Auckland Railway Network, which is double track. It has an island platform layout and can be reached from a ramp on the Market Road motorway overbridge
    5.50
    2 votes
    119
    Chama

    Chama

    • Railways terminating here: Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad
    Chama is a village in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 1,199 at the 2000 census. It is a small village, but tourism is starting to help the town's economy. Chama is located at 36°53′41″N 106°35′4″W / 36.89472°N 106.58444°W / 36.89472; -106.58444 (36.894777, -106.584406), on the Rio Chama. According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.6 square miles (6.7 km), all of it land. Chama is the western terminus of the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad, a steam-driven, narrow gauge heritage railway which carries visitors to and from Osier, CO and Antonito, CO during the summer months. It is the remaining 64 mile portion of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad's San Juan Extension built in the 1880s between Alamosa, CO and Durango, CO. The route was abandoned in the late 1960s and the tracks from Chama westward to Durango were torn up soon afterwards. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,199 people, 467 households, and 312 families residing in the village. The population density was 467.9 people per square mile (180.8/km²). There were 601 housing units at an average density of 234.5 per square mile (90.6/km²). The racial
    6.00
    1 votes
    120
    Cross Creek Railway Station

    Cross Creek Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Cross Creek railway station was the base of operations for the Rimutaka Incline, a Fell railway over the Rimutaka Ranges, and part of the original Wairarapa Line between Upper Hutt and Featherston in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. This station existed solely for the operational requirements of the Incline. It did not consign goods, or serve any local settlements, save for the railway staff that were based there. Though the origin of the name Cross Creek has not always been clear, it is generally accepted based on the writings of surveyor John Rochfort that it was derived from a Mr. Lot Cross, who lived and farmed in the vicinity of the site that was later to become the station. In the early days of the railway, it was known as Cross’s Creek, but was simplified to Cross Creek in the 1880s. Construction of the station was included in the Incline Contract, which was to cover formation works from south of the Summit Tunnel to Featherston. It was awarded to contractor Charles McKirdy for the sum of £49,029 on 5 October 1875. The station started out with a simple yard layout that included; the safety siding, two loops with capacities of 20 and 26 wagons, and a two
    6.00
    1 votes
    121
    Kamata Station

    Kamata Station

    • Railways terminating here: Tokyu Tamagawa Line
    Kamata Station (蒲田駅, Kamata-eki) is an interchange train station located in Ōta, Tokyo, Japan. Kamata Station is served by the following lines: Keikyū Kamata Station of the Keihin Electric Express Railway Company is located about 700 m to the east of Kamata Station. The JR East station is a surface station with platforms in a north-south direction. The Tōkyū station is located to the southwest corner of the JR station.
    6.00
    1 votes
    122

    Linden Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Linden Railway Station is located on the North Island Main Trunk Railway (NIMT) in Linden, New Zealand and is part of the suburban rail network of Wellington. It is double tracked, has an island platform layout, and is 14.91 km from Wellington Railway Station, the southern terminus of the NIMT. Linden is served by Kapiti Line commuter trains operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand. Trains run every thirty minutes off-peak, and more frequently during peak periods. A number of peak services run express between Porirua and Wellington and thus do not stop at Linden Station. The commuter trains are operated by electric multiple units. These were formerly DM/D class units but are now almost always units of the EM/ET class. Two diesel-hauled carriage trains, the Capital Connection and the Overlander, pass through the station but do not stop. The line through Linden was originally part of the Wellington - Manawatu Line. Built by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company (WMR), the full line to Longburn was completed in 1886 and trains were operated by the WMR until December 1908, when the New Zealand Railways Department purchased the WMR and incorporated its line into the
    6.00
    1 votes
    123
    Raroa Railway Station

    Raroa Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Raroa Railway Station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand's North Island. It serves the suburbs of Raroa and Broadmeadows, and is one of four stations on the line to be located on a curve. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). Raroa came into existence subsequent to electrification to serve the needs of the expanding population north of Wellington and was opened on 17 June 1940. Raroa Station is notable as the terminus for the last freight traffic on the Johnsonville Branch. Because of transport licensing regulations under a 1931 Act of parliament that required rail to be used in preference to road to cart goods over certain distances if there was a rail option, livestock trains were run on the Johnsonville Branch to transport livestock to the railhead nearest the abattoirs in the Ngauranga Gorge. The terminus of this service used to be the stockyards at Johnsonville station, but public pressure in the 1950s resulted in the stockyards being relocated to Raroa
    6.00
    1 votes
    124
    Solway Railway Station

    Solway Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Solway railway station is an urban single-platform railway station in the Wairarapa town of Masterton in New Zealand’s North Island. It is on Ngaumutawa Road, between Hillcrest Street and Judds Road. It is one of three railway stations in Masterton, the others being Masterton and Renall Street. As part of the Wairarapa station upgrade programme to prepare stations for the SW-class passenger carriages, this station was upgraded between 14 May 2007 and late August 2007. When the station was opened along with the line to Masterton on 1 November 1880 it had only a shelter and platform. It was originally named Kurupuni and was located south of Masterton. Later, the station was briefly known as Purakau between 1908 and 1912 when it was renamed Solway. The station was never regarded as being of any great importance but did also handle freight until 1986 with customers including the Wairarapa Electric Power Board and a fertiliser company. A new car park was built at the station in 2001 by the Masterton District Council as part of a regional programme to "Enhance and expand urban public passenger transport facilities and services". In 2006 it was proposed that the historic Class 6 station
    6.00
    1 votes
    125
    Stockton-on-Tees

    Stockton-on-Tees

    • Railways terminating here: Stockton and Darlington Railway
    Stockton-on-Tees is a market town in north east England. It is the major settlement in the unitary authority and borough of Stockton-on-Tees. For ceremonial purposes, the borough is split between County Durham and North Yorkshire as it also incorporates a number of smaller towns and villages including Billingham, Yarm, Thornaby and Norton. Historically part of County Durham, the wider borough has a population of 191,000 in 2011 estimates. Stockton is an Anglo-Saxon name with the typical Anglo-Saxon place name ending 'ton' meaning farm, or homestead. The name is thought by some to derive from the Anglo-Saxon word Stocc meaning log, tree trunk or wooden post. 'Stockton' could therefore mean a farm built of logs. This is disputed, because when the word Stocc forms the first part of a place name it usually indicates a derivation from the similar word Stoc, meaning cell, monastery or place. 'Stoc' names along with places called Stoke or Stow, usually indicate farms which belonged to a manor or religious house. It is thought that Stockton fell into this category and perhaps the name is an indication that Stockton was an outpost of Durham or Norton which were both important Anglo-Saxon
    6.00
    1 votes
    126
    Sturges Road Train Station

    Sturges Road Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Sturges Road railway station is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. Sturges Road has a park & ride facility available. For many years this station's name was mis-spelt as Sturgess Road. The road was named after a local family living in the area in the 19th century called Sturges, but the incorrect spelling remained in use for many decades until it was corrected in the 1990s. Suburban train services are provided by Veolia (New Zealand) on behalf of the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA).
    6.00
    1 votes
    127
    Kingsland Train Station

    Kingsland Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Kingsland Railway Station is on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. It is near Eden Park, the major rugby stadium in Auckland. The station has a side platform layout and is reached from both New North Road & Sandringham Road. During rugby games this station, 400m from Eden Park, is very busy, with thousands of supporters using it. This station is conveniently located for transfers to buses running past the station, including to Auckland CBD via New North Road. The full list of services is:-
    5.00
    2 votes
    128
    New York City

    New York City

    • Railways terminating here: Silver Star
    New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. The city is referred to as New York City or The City of New York to distinguish it from the State of New York, of which it is a part. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York is an important center for international diplomacy and has been described as the cultural capital of the world. Located on one of the world's largest natural harbors, New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a state county. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a Census-estimated 2011 population of 8,244,910 distributed over a land area of just 305 square miles (790 km), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world. The New York City Metropolitan
    5.00
    2 votes
    129

    Stoke Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Stoke railway station was a single-platform provincial railway station serving the town of Stoke, south of Nelson in New Zealand’s South Island. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and existed from 1876 to 1955. Facilities at the station included a small wooden station building, a thirty-one wagon loop, a loading bank and stockyards. The first section of the Nelson Section to be built was from Stoke to Foxhill, as the route for this part of the line was the first to be confirmed while the route out of Nelson was still being debated. This included the construction of the Stoke railway station, which was opened along with the first completed section from Nelson to Foxhill on 29 January 1876. The first “turning-of-the-first-sod” ceremony on the Nelson Section was held at Saxton’s Field, just south of Stoke, and this location, along with the Stoke racecourse, would become some of the first destinations for excursion trains. In later years, the station became popular with racecourse patrons and students commuting to secondary school in Nelson. One notable feature of Stoke is the fact that it was the only location on the Nelson Section where the mainline rail was heavier
    5.00
    2 votes
    130
    Malpensa Aeroporto railway station

    Malpensa Aeroporto railway station

    • Railways terminating here: Malpensa Express
    Malpensa Aeroporto railway station, or Malpensa Airport railway station, is located in the Terminal 1 of Malpensa Airport (IATA code: MXP) in Ferno, Varese, near Milan. Opened in 1999, the station is the western terminus of the Busto Arsizio–Malpensa Airport railway. The airport and station are also known as Milan-Malpensa Airport, because the airport is the main airport serving Milan. The station is managed by Ferrovienord. Most train services are operated by LeNORD. Other train services are operated by Trenitalia. The Malpensa Express is a train service operated by LeNORD. It links Malpensa Airport with Milano Cadorna railway station in about 40 minutes, and runs every 30 minutes in each direction from early morning until late evening. Since 13 September 2010, Malpensa Airport has also been a terminus of two pairs of long distance Frecciarossa trains operated by Trenitalia. One of these train pairs runs to and from Napoli Centrale, via Roma Termini, Firenze Santa Maria Novella, Bologna Centrale and Milano Centrale. The second pair operates along part of the same route, between Malpensa Aeroporto and Firenza Santa Maria Novella. Media related to Malpensa Aeroporto railway station
    4.50
    2 votes
    131

    Tui Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Tui railway station was a rural railway station that served the small farming settlement of Tui in the Tasman District of New Zealand’s South Island. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and lasted from 1912 to 1955. Facilities at this station included: stockyards, accessed via a 22-wagon backshunt; two loops, having a 37 and 27 wagon capacity respectively; a station building; a main goods shed with dimensions of 30 by 20 feet (9.1 × 6.1 m) and a second smaller goods shed; a loading bank; an outhouse; a railway house (for many years occupied by the local surfaceman); and a water vat. Tui station was opened along with the Kiwi to Glenhope section of the line on 2 September 1912, the date the Public Works Department handed control over to the Railways Department. This section became the last section of the line for most of the life of the Nelson Section, with Glenhope remaining the terminus for all but five years of its operation. The area in which the station was located was originally known as Mana, and was home to several sawmills. Much of the verdant growth was cleared so farms could be established on the land. While initially successful, these farms eventually proved
    4.50
    2 votes
    132
    Auckland railway station

    Auckland railway station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Auckland Railway Station is the former main railway station of Auckland, New Zealand, and is located on the eastern edge of the Auckland CBD near Mechanics Bay. It was a city landmark from the time it was opened in 1930, and is a grand architectural statement in beaux-arts brick and mortar, having been called "one of the most self-consciously monumental public buildings erected in early twentieth-century New Zealand". The building was designed by William Henry Gummer (1884–1966), a student of Sir Edward Lutyens and architect of various notable New Zealand buildings such as the Dilworth Building in Queen Street. The station closed in late July 2003 when services were moved to the new Britomart Transport Centre. The former platform 4 (Platform 7 at time of opening) of the station has been retained for excursion use as The Strand, named after a nearby street; it continued to be used by a limited number of peak-hour suburban trains for a few months following the opening of Britomart. The remaining platforms of the former station may be to be removed as part of ONTRACK's redevelopment of Quay Park junction, with the area used identified as a possible storage area for suburban trains
    5.00
    1 votes
    133
    Masterton Railway Station

    Masterton Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Masterton railway station is a single-platform, urban railway station serving the town of Masterton in New Zealand's Wairarapa district. The station lies on the Wairarapa Line, and is located at the end of Perry Street. It is one hour, thirty-seven minutes journey time to Wellington. Trains for the Wairarapa Connection service terminate at this station. Masterton is one of three stations in the town of Masterton, the others being Renall Street and Solway. The station building has a ticket office and café; the yard has working freight-handling facilities, a goods shed, and a turntable and engine/railcar shed. The original Masterton station was erected in 1880 and included a goods shed, sheep and cattle yards, and an engine shed with coal and water facilities. In 1894 a windmill and pump were installed to improve the supply of water for locomotive and station use. In 1897 a turntable was installed, and in 1902 the station was refurbished, which included the addition of refreshment rooms. In 1954 a new 55-foot (17 m) turntable was installed, followed two years later by a railcar shed. Following the introduction of diesel-electric locomotives in 1955, the engine shed was used by the
    5.00
    1 votes
    134
    Middlemore Train Station

    Middlemore Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Middlemore Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has side platforms on each of the northbound and southbound lines connected by a pedestrian level crossing at the south end of the platforms. Access to the station is via Hospital Road: it is next to Middlemore Hospital. During the day on weekdays there are 6 trains an hour to Britomart (3 via Glen Innes and 3 via Newmarket), and 4 trains an hour to Papakura, of which one train continues to Pukekohe. In September 2007, Counties Manukau District Healthboard, ARTNL and ARTA opened a new railway footbridge and staff walkway at Middlemore rail station. The footbridge provides safer access to Middlemore Hospital from the staff carpark.
    5.00
    1 votes
    135
    Renall Street Railway Station

    Renall Street Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Renall Street railway station is an urban single-platform railway station on Renall Street in the Wairarapa town of Masterton in New Zealand’s North Island. Renall Street is one of three railway stations in Masterton, the others being Masterton and Solway. As part of the Wairarapa station upgrade programme to prepare stations for the new SW-class passenger carriages, this station was closed from 14 May 2007 until early July 2007. As the construction of the Wairarapa Line progressed in 1880, the rails reached the “Upper Plains crossing” in late August 1880. On 28 August a special train conveyed members of parliament and their families from Wellington to the “Upper Plains crossing” where some picnicked, while others were taken by coach into town to refresh themselves at a hotel. In 1936, Renall Street became a stopping place for railcars, coinciding with the introduction of the Wairarapa railcars. Despite strong public support, it was not until 1937 that a shelter and platform were provided at the Upper Plains crossing. The station also had several private sidings serving oil companies and other industrial interests. These sidings have been removed. A nearby bus stop allows
    5.00
    1 votes
    136
    Sylvia Park Train Station

    Sylvia Park Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Sylvia Park train station is a railway station on the Eastern line of the passenger rail network in Auckland, New Zealand. It serves the recently opened Sylvia Park mall and the surrounding suburb of Mount Wellington. The new Sylvia Park station was funded by the builders of the mall and built by ARTNL/ARTA. The new station opened to the public on Monday 2 July 2007. The station cost NZ$5 million to build. The new station has a fairly high patronage, mainly people going shopping at the new Sylvia Park Shopping Centre. An earlier station was opened at the site in 1930 and closed during the World War II period (1940-1945), due to the American government buying the land next to the railway and using it for army sheds. Another station with the same name existed approximately 1 km west of this site. Passengers were mostly for the adjacent Westfield Freezing Works until 1986 when it was closed due to lack of patronage. Services are provided at least half-hourly on weekdays, with services at least hourly on weekends and public holidays.
    5.00
    1 votes
    137

    Beach Railway Station, New Zealand

    • Railways terminating here:
    Beach railway station was a station on the privately owned but government operated Hutt Park Railway in Petone, a suburb of the city of Lower Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand’s North Island. It was located at the junction of the Wairarapa Line and the Hutt Park Railway, a short distance south of the government-owned Petone Railway Station. It was established by the privately held Hutt Park Railway Company to serve race trains between Wellington and the Hutt Park Racecourse, and was intended to be used by patrons living in the vicinity, as well as those wishing to connect with government run services on the Wairarapa Line. The station saw its first traffic on 6 February 1885 when the inaugural race trains on the Hutt Park Railway were run to a meeting of the Wellington Racing Club at the racecourse. Facilities provided were always meagre, initially consisting simply of some levelled ground next to the railway line, a ticket booth, and a telephone. By 1895 the alignment of the junction of the Hutt Park Railway with the Wairarapa Line had been altered, moving the line closer to the shoreline and thus also the station. A missive from the Traffic Manager on 6 February 1895
    4.00
    1 votes
    138
    Gosport

    Gosport

    • Railways terminating here:
    Gosport /ˈɡɒspɔrt/ is a town, district and borough situated on the south coast of England, within the county of Hampshire. It has approximately 80,000 permanent residents with a further 5,000–10,000 during the summer months. It is part of the South Hampshire conurbation and lies on a peninsula on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour opposite the City of Portsmouth, to which it is linked by a pedestrian ferry. Up until the last quarter of the 20th century, Gosport was a major naval and military town associated with the defence and supply infrastructure of Her Majesty's Naval Base (HMNB) Portsmouth. As a result of a decline in these activities, many of its fortifications and installations, such as Fort Brockhurst, have been opened to the public as tourism and heritage sites, with extensive redevelopment of the harbour area as a marina. The Rowner area of the peninsula was known to have been settled in Saxon times, mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicles as Rughenor (Rough bank or slope). Both Rowner and Alverstoke (a village now within the boundaries of Gosport), the name coming from the original point where the River Alver entered the Solent at Stokes Bay, were included in the
    4.00
    1 votes
    139
    Matarawa Railway Station

    Matarawa Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Matarawa railway station is a single-platform railway station on the Wairarapa Line that serves the small rural community of Matarawa in the Wairarapa district of New Zealand. It is served by the Wairarapa Connection, and has five services each way on Monday to Thursday, six on Friday and two on Saturday and Sunday. This station opened on 1 November 1880, when the line between Woodside Junction and Masterton was officially opened. Initially it had a shelter shed, loading bank and crossing loop and was used to cross trains until the introduction of signalling at the larger Wairarapa stations. In its early years several sawmills flourished in the vicinity, with timber making up a bulk of the goods loaded. The crossing loop and private sawmill sidings have been removed. In 2006, with the introduction of the SW-class carriages for the Wairarapa Connection looming, it was proposed that this station be closed due to its low patronage and the cost involved in building a platform so that passengers could safely board and disembark from the new carriages. After vocal opposition from local residents, this proposal was rescinded. This station was temporarily closed from 17 May 2007 to 4 June
    4.00
    1 votes
    140

    Takanini Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Takanini Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform layout and is accessed from Manuroa Road, Station Road and Taka Street. A proposal was made by the former Papakura District Council to create a new station and Park and Ride facility at Glenora Road, next to the new Southgate shopping centre, to coincide with the new Addison residential development taking place on the former horse training track land. In 2012 the Papakura Local Board requested a new station and park and ride be built at Walters Road. This proposal was listed in Auckland Transport's draft land transport plan.
    4.00
    1 votes
    141

    Appleby Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Appleby railway station was a rural railway station between the towns of Richmond and Hope in the Tasman district of New Zealand’s South Island, and was located on State Highway 60, otherwise known as Appleby Highway. The settlement of Appleby was actually located some distance from the railway, but Appleby station was the closest station to its namesake settlement. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and existed from 1876 to 1955. Facilities at this station included a small wooden passenger shelter, a goods shed and a siding to serve it. The first section of the Nelson Section to be built was from Stoke to Foxhill, as the route for this part of the line was the first to be confirmed while the route out of Nelson was still being debated. This included the construction of the Appleby railway station, which was opened along with the first completed section from Nelson to Foxhill on 29 January 1876. Because this station did not have a direct connection with a neighbouring settlement, it was always considered to be a small station of lesser importance, though it did attract some regular traffic such as school students from the surrounding rural districts who commuted into
    0.00
    0 votes
    142
    Beijing West Railway Station

    Beijing West Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Beijing West Railway Station, also known as Beijing West or West Passenger Station (Chinese: 北京西客站; pinyin: Běijīng Xī kèzhàn; abb. Běijīng Xī 北京西, colloquially referred to as West Station 西站) is located in western Beijing's Fengtai District. Opened in early 1996 after three years of construction, it is the largest railway station in Asia with 510,000m². The station serves in average 150,000–180,000 passengers per day with a maximum of 400,000 people per day. It was expanded in 2000 and had a vast amount of parking lots added. The Beijing West station opened in 1996 and cost a record three-quarters-of-a-billion dollars, but its construction has been criticized by some over suspicions of corruption during the construction. Trains departing from Beijing West leave for destinations to the West (including Xi'an, Chongqing and Chengdu), as well as trains for Lhasa and Urumqi in the far West of China and the Beijing-Guangzhou and Beijing-Kowloon Main Trunk Lines. The well-known Jingjiu Railway, or Beijing-Kowloon Railway line, begins from this railway station. Since the opening of the Qingzang railway in 2006, it is possible to catch a direct train to Lhasa from this station. This
    0.00
    0 votes
    143
    Box Hill Railway Station

    Box Hill Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Box Hill railway station is one of eight stations on the Johnsonville Branch, a commuter branch railway north of Wellington in New Zealand's North Island. It serves the suburbs of Khandallah and Te Kainga. It is the only station on the line to be set below street level, and one of four on the line which is on a curve. Electric multiple unit trains are operated by Tranz Metro under the Metlink brand through this station in both directions to Johnsonville (to the north) and Wellington (to the south). Box Hill is one of the more recent stations on the Johnsonville Branch, having been opened in 1956. Trains run in both directions through this station, departing at half-hourly intervals, supplemented by a 13/13/26 schedule at peak times on week days. The nearest bus routes are #44 and #45 which pass through Khandallah Village. This station has a single side platform and passenger shelter. Pedestrian access is from Cockayne Road, and from the north end of the platform to Box Hill by a footpath under the adjacent road overbridge to Box Hill (road). There is no dedicated station car park available.
    0.00
    0 votes
    144
    Glasgow Central station

    Glasgow Central station

    • Railways terminating here: West Coast Main Line
    Glasgow Central (Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu Mheadhain) is the larger of the two present main-line railway terminals in Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland. The station was opened by the Caledonian Railway on 31 July 1879 and is currently one of 17 UK stations managed by Network Rail. It is the northern terminus of the West Coast Main Line. The station serves all of the Greater Glasgow conurbation's southern suburbs and towns, and the Ayrshire and Clyde coasts, and is the terminus for all inter-city services between Glasgow and destinations in England. There is also a limited service to Edinburgh although the city's second mainline terminus, Glasgow Queen Street, is the principal station for trains to Edinburgh. With nearly 25 million passenger entries and exits between April 2010 and March 2011, Glasgow Central is the ninth-busiest railway station in Britain, the busiest in Scotland and the busiest outside London. According to Network Rail, over 38 million people use it annually, 80% of whom are passengers. The station is protected as a category A listed building. The original station, opened on 1 August 1879 on the north bank of the River Clyde, had eight platforms and was linked
    0.00
    0 votes
    145

    Gowanbridge Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Gowanbridge railway station was a rural railway station that served the small settlement of Gowanbridge in the Tasman District of New Zealand’s South Island. Gowanbridge is located on State Highway 6 at the junction with Gowan Valley Road, and is also passed by on one side by the Buller River. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and though completed in 1929, it never saw any revenue service nor was it ever owned or operated by the Railways Department. Facilities at this station included a platform, stockyards, goods shed, two sidings, and a loading bank. As this was the last station on the line before construction ceased in 1931, it was also a staging point for construction crews and materials, necessitating the erection of several additional buildings for this activity. By 1928 formation work between Kawatiri and Gowanbridge had been completed, though a lack of enthusiasm for the project and an official rejection of a continuation of the line past Gowanbridge contributed to a reduction in the workforce down to an average of sixty. The 1928 general election in December was won by Sir Joseph Ward and the United Party, with one of their planks being to borrow £70,000,000
    0.00
    0 votes
    146

    Heretaunga Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Heretaunga Railway Station is an island platform urban railway station in Heretaunga, a suburb of the city of Upper Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand's North Island. It is on the Hutt Valley Line section of the Wairarapa Line. This station is served by Tranz Metro's electric multiple unit trains, typically of the EM/ET class. The station was opened in 1908
    0.00
    0 votes
    147
    Liverpool

    Liverpool

    • Railways terminating here: Grand Junction Railway
    Liverpool ( /ˈlɪvərpuːl/) is a city and metropolitan borough of Merseyside, England, United Kingdom along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. It was founded as a borough in 1207 and was granted city status in 1880. It is the fourth most populous British city, and third most populous in England, with a 2011 population of 466,400 and is at the centre of a wider urban area, the Liverpool City Region, which has a population of around 2 million people. Historically a part of Lancashire, the urbanisation and expansion of Liverpool were both largely brought about by the city's status as a major port. By the 18th century, trade from the West Indies, Ireland and mainland Europe coupled with close links with the Atlantic Slave Trade furthered the economic expansion of Liverpool. By the early 19th century, 40% of the world's trade passed through Liverpool's docks, contributing to Liverpool's rise as a major city. Liverpool is also well known for its inventions and innovations, particularly in terms of infrastructure, transportation and general construction. Railways, ferries and the skyscraper were all pioneered in the city. Inhabitants of Liverpool are referred to as Liverpudlians but
    0.00
    0 votes
    148

    Mumbai Central

    • Railways terminating here: Mumbai Rajdhani Express
    Mumbai Central (formerly Bombay Central), is a major intercity railway station in Mumbai and also a station on the Western Line of the Mumbai Suburban Railway. It was designed by the British architect Claude Batley. It serves as the terminal for several long distance trains operated by Western Railway. The station is located in south Mumbai and the area around the station is known by the same name. Trains depart from the station to various destinations in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab and Delhi. Mumbai Rajdhani, one of Indian Railways' most prestigious trains, departs for New Delhi. The Bombay Baroda Central India Rail organization has extended its reach from Baroda to Pathankot via Delhi. The Colaba-Ballard Pier Railway Station proved insufficient in meeting the demands of a growing population which led the government to make plans for the construction of Bombay Central. In addition to these, some passenger trains and holiday special trains also depart from Mumbai Central. The station is divided into two parts. The eastern half of the station serves long distance trains operated by Indian Railways while the western half serves commuter trains running on
    0.00
    0 votes
    149
    Namibe

    Namibe

    • Railways terminating here: Moçâmedes Railway
    Namibe (pre-1985: Moçâmedes) is the capital city of Namibe Province in modern day Angola. It is a coastal desert city located in southwestern Angola and was founded in 1840 by the Portuguese rulers of Portuguese Angola. The city's current population is 132,900 (2004 estimate). Namibe has a cool dry climate and desert vegetation due to its proximity to the Namib Desert. A coastal desert city located in southwestern Angola, it was officially founded in 1840 by the rulers of Portuguese Angola on a bay that the Portuguese originally called Angra do Negro. The area was first explored by the Portuguese in 1785, and was claimed for Portugal by Luís Cândido Cordeiro Pinheiro Furtado, who had been sent there in the frigate Loanda by the then governor-general of Angola, Baron Moçâmedes, who also sent an overland expedition headed by Gregório José Mendes to rendezvous with Furtado. It was they who renamed the bay Moçâmedes in honour of the man who had sent them. In 1839 the then governor-general of Angola, Admiral Noronha, sent a fresh expedition to subdue the Sobas or chieftains of the region and establish them as vassals of Portugal. In 1840 a factory was established by two merchants,
    0.00
    0 votes
    150

    Richmond Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Richmond railway station was a single-platform urban railway station serving the town of Richmond in the Tasman district of New Zealand’s South Island. It was one of 25 stations on the Nelson Section, and existed from 1876 to 1955. Richmond was, at the time, the second largest town in the district, and accordingly received a station befitting its status. Facilities included a wooden station building (which for several decades also housed a Post & Telegraph Office), two water vats, gangers sheds, stockyards, a 12 wagon backshunt, and a goods shed. The first section of the Nelson Section to be built was from Stoke to Foxhill, as the route for this part of the line was the first to be confirmed while the route out of Nelson was still being debated. This included the construction of the Richmond railway station, which was opened along with the first completed section from Nelson to Foxhill on 29 January 1876. Richmond was appointed a stationmaster, who was based there until being transferred in 1910. The station remained unmanned until protests from locals resulted in the appointment of a porter in 1913. With improvements to the local highways, traffic through Richmond station was
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    151

    Shibuya Station

    • Railways terminating here: Tokyu Toyoko Line
    Shibuya Station (渋谷駅, Shibuya-eki) is a railway station in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan, operated jointly by East Japan Railway Company (JR East), Keio Corporation, Tokyu Corporation, and Tokyo Metro. With 2.4 million passengers on an average weekday in 2004, it is the fourth-busiest commuter rail station in Japan (after Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, and Ōsaka / Umeda) handling a large amount of commuter traffic between the center city and suburbs to the south and west. Note that the Hanzōmon Line and the Fukutoshin Line are directly connected (without passing through ticket gates), but they are not directly connected to the Ginza Line. There is no direct connection between the two Tōkyū lines either. The main station building is occupied by a Tokyu department store. The Tokyo Metro Ginza Line, originally built and operated by a Tokyu keiretsu company, uses platforms on the third floor. The JR lines and Tōkyū Tōyoko Line use parallel platforms on the second floor, while the Tokyo Metro Hanzōmon Line and Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line share platforms underground, and the Keiō Inokashira Line uses platforms on the second floor of the Shibuya Mark City building to the west of the main station complex. The
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    152

    Sunnyvale Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Sunnyvale railway station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland railway network. In 2006/2007, the station was closed over summer to be upgraded, and lengthened for 6-car trains. Sunnyvale railway station was seen during the fourth episode of Outrageous Fortune's fifth season.
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    153

    Te Mahia Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Te Mahia Train Station is on the Southern Line of the Auckland railway network. It has an island platform layout and is reached by level crossings from Great South Road and Fergusson Street. The station was renamed from Mahia to Te Mahia from 9 February 1951 by a decision of the New Zealand Geographic Board There have been proposals to relocate this station approximately 200m north to a more visible location next to the Great South Road, near the overbridge. The station is due to be upgraded by 30 July 2012, as part of Auckland Transport's station upgrade program.
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    154

    Trentham Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Trentham Railway Station is an urban railway station in Trentham, a suburb of the city of Upper Hutt in the Wellington region of New Zealand's North Island. It is on the Hutt Valley Line section of the Wairarapa Line and has two side platforms. The station is served by Tranz Metro's electric multiple unit trains, usually of the EM class. The double-tracking of the Wairarapa Line ends at Trentham Railway Station. It then becomes single track as the line continues north. The 2011 – 2012 Regional Rail Plan (RRP) proposeso duplicating the track between Trentham and Upper Hutt in 2012. The platform on the Racecourse Road side is only used for special occasions that occur at the Trentham Racecourse. Tranz Metro tickets can be purchased from the Racecourse Dairy, opposite the railway station. The station was opened in 1907 Tretham Railway Station serves the following Metlink bus services:
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    155
    Vladivostok

    Vladivostok

    • Railways terminating here: Trans-Siberian Railway
    Vladivostok (Russian: Владивосто́к; IPA: [vlədʲɪvɐˈstok] ( listen)) is a city and the administrative center of Primorsky Krai, Russia, situated at the head of the Golden Horn Bay, not far from Russia's borders with China and North Korea. The population of the city, according to the preliminary results of the 2010 Census, is 592,069, down from 594,701 recorded in the 2002 Census. The city is the home port of the Russian Pacific Fleet and the largest Russian port on the Pacific Ocean. Vladivostok is hosting the ongoing 24th Summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum. In preparation for the event, the infrastructure of the city was renovated and improved. Two giant cable-stayed bridges were constructed in Vladivostok, namely the Zolotoy Rog bridge over the Golden Horn Bay in the center of the city, and the Russky Island Bridge from the mainland to Russky Island, where the summit is taking place. The latter bridge will be awarded the distinction of longest cable-stayed bridge in the world. The name Vladivostok loosely translates from Russian as "Ruler of the East"—a name similar to Vladikavkaz which means "Ruler of the Caucasus". In Chinese, the city was known since
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    156

    Wiri Train Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Wiri Train Station was a former station on the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland Railway Network in New Zealand. To the north is Puhinui Train Station and to the south Homai Train Station. Opened on 9 December 1913, the station closed on 14 February 2005, being at that time the station with the lowest patronage in Auckland. In the coming years, the site of the train station will be taken over by the new stabling and maintenance depot for Auckland's new electric trains.
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    157
    Woodside Railway Station

    Woodside Railway Station

    • Railways terminating here:
    Woodside railway station is a single-platform rural railway station on the Wairarapa Line, serving the town of Greytown in the Wairarapa district of New Zealand about five kilometres away. It is 30 minutes from Masterton, one hour and six minutes from Wellington, and is served by Metlink Wairarapa Connection trains. The station building has in recent years been restored by the Woodside Station Preservation Society. The original survey for the Wairarapa Line, completed in 1876, considered two routes for the line between Featherston and Masterton: the Central route and the Western route. Despite the protestations of the residents of Greytown, the Western route was chosen due to concerns about the possibility of flooding north of Greytown, which meant that the line bypassed Greytown and passed through Woodside instead. Woodside opened on 14 May 1880 with the extension of the line from Featherston to Greytown. Until the line between Woodside and Masterton was completed and opened in November of that year, Woodside was the northern terminus of the Wairarapa Line operated by the Public Works Department, initially with two mixed trains between Greytown and Wellington each day. The
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