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Best Steam locomotive class of All Time

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    1
    Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives

    Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives

    • Wheel configuration: 4-2-2
    The 20 Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives were broad gauge 4-2-2 express steam locomotives built for the Bristol and Exeter Railway by the Stothert and Slaughter in Bristol. The first entered service in 1849. The Bristol and Exeter Railway was amalgamated into the Great Western Railway on 1 January 1876 and eight 4-2-2s survived at this time, the last being withdrawn in 1889. Three of the infamous 4-2-4T locomotives were rebuilt by the Great Western Railway in 1877 as 4-2-2 tender locomotives. The Bristol and Exeter Railway's first express passenger locomotives, similar in appearance to the GWR Iron Duke Class. Following rebuilding as 4-2-2 tender locomotives at Swindon, the three remaining 8 feet 10 inch 4-2-4T locomotives had slightly smaller 8 feet diameter driving wheels and worked alongside the rigid-framed GWR Rover class and the remaining 1849-built ex-Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives on express passenger trains.
    5.63
    8 votes
    2
    British Rail Class 04

    British Rail Class 04

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The British Rail Class 04 0-6-0 diesel-mechanical shunting locomotive class was built between 1952 and 1962 and was the basis for the later Class 03 built in the British Railways workshops. However, the first locomotive to be built to the design was actually DS1173, in 1948, which served as a departmental shunter at Hither Green depot, before being transferred to the capital stock list as D2341 in 1967. The Class 04 locomotives were supplied by the Drewry Car Co., which at the time (and for most of its existence) had no manufacturing capability. Drewry sub-contracted the construction work to two builders both of whom built other locomotives under the same arrangement. Early locomotives (including DS1173) were built by Vulcan Foundry and later examples were built by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns. A clear line of development can be seen in the Class 04s from the 0-4-0DM locomotives built by Andrew Barclay and Drewry/Vulcan Foundry in the early 1940s. The design continued to develop during the construction period, but this was generally confined to the size of the cab windows and the diameter of the wheels. Similar locomotives had been built before the first Class 04, and others
    8.00
    5 votes
    3
    Russian locomotive class FD

    Russian locomotive class FD

    • Wheel configuration:
    The Soviet locomotive class FD (Russian: ФД) was a Soviet main freight steam locomotive type. Between 1932 and 1942, 3213 locomotives were built. The locomotive was created in connection with the industrialization conducted in the USSR. Planning took only 100 days, and typical construction time was 170 days. For certain features the design engineers referred to American practice in steam locomotive design. The first locomotive was built at the Lugansk Locomotive Factory in 1931 and sent for a show to Moscow. Tests, in which the locomotive performed well, were conducted in 1932. In that year the Voroshilovgradskom plant began mass production of ФД20 locomotives. Over the course of production their construction got better steadily. From the beginning of the Great Patriotic war in 1941, production was interrupted only in 1942; four locomotives were built in Ulan Ude. Total production was 2927 locomotives of ФД20 and 286 locomotives of ФД21. The two subclasses only differed in the type of superheater. The locomotives of ФД operated in areas with high turnover of goods. They worked on 23 of 43 railways in the USSR, including in Siberia and in the Urals. From middle of 1950, in
    8.00
    4 votes
    4

    GWR Metropolitan Class

    • Wheel configuration: 2-4-0
    The Great Western Railway Metropolitan Class 2-4-0T broad gauge steam locomotives with condensing apparatus were used for working trains on the Metropolitan Railway. The equipment was later removed, though the class continued to work suburban trains on GWR lines in London. The class was introduced into service between June 1862 and October 1864, and withdrawn between June 1871 and December 1877. The locomotives were built by three workshops, each with a different naming system. The first two batches were delivered concurrently by the Vulcan Foundry (named after insects), and Kitson & Co. (named after foreign monarchs). These were followed by a batch from the railway's own workshops at Swindon, which were named after flowers.
    7.25
    4 votes
    5
    GER Class S56

    GER Class S56

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The GER Class S56 was a class of 0-6-0T steam tank locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway. Together with some rebuilt examples of GER Class R24, they passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923, and received the LNER classification J69. The Class S56 were a development of the Class R24, being almost identical, apart from higher boiler pressure and larger water tanks. Twenty were built in 1904 at Stratford Works. All twenty passed to the LNER in 1923. Thirteen class J69 locomotives were lent to the War Department in October 1939, of which five had been built as Class S56. They were sold to the War Department in October 1940, where they were used on the Melbourne and Longmoor Military Railways. The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8617–8636 in order of construction; however gaps were left where the locomotives sold to the War Department would have been. At nationalisation in 1948, the remainder passed to British Railways, who added 60000 to their number. Post-war withdrawals started in 1958, and by 1962 all had been retired. GER no. 87 (LNER 7087, 8633, BR 68633) has been preserved, initially at the Clapham Transport Museum,
    6.75
    4 votes
    6
    GER Class Y14

    GER Class Y14

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The Great Eastern Railway (GER) Class Y14 is a class of 0-6-0 steam locomotive. The LNER classified them J15. The Class Y14 was designed by T.W. Worsdell for both freight and passenger duties - a veritable 'maid of all work'. Introduced in July 1883, they were so successful that all the succeeding chief superintendents continued to build new batches down to 1913 with little design change, the final total being 289. During World War I, 43 of the engines served in France and Belgium. On 10–11 December 1891, the Great Eastern Railway's Stratford Works built one of these locomotives and had it in steam with a coat of grey primer in 9 hours 47 minutes; this remains a world record. The locomotive then went off to run 36,000 miles on Peterborough to London coal trains before coming back to the works for the final coat of paint. It lasted 40 years and ran a total of 1,127,750 miles. Because of their light weight the locomotives were given the Route Availability (RA) number 1, indicating that they could work over nearly all routes. A class J15 locomotive was involved in a boiler explosion at Westerfield railway station on 25 September 1900. As built all the locomotives had a stovepipe
    8.67
    3 votes
    7

    GWR Prince Class

    • Wheel configuration: 2-2-2
    The Great Western Railway Prince Class 2-2-2 broad gauge steam locomotives for passenger train work. This class was introduced into service between August 1846 and March 1847, and withdrawn between January and September 1870. From about 1865, the Prince Class locomotives became part of the Priam Class, along with the Fire Fly Class locomotives.
    6.50
    4 votes
    8

    British Rail Class D2/12

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    British Rail Class D2/12 was a locomotive commissioned by British Rail in England. It was a diesel powered locomotive in the pre-TOPS period built by Hudswell Clarke with a Gardner engine. The mechanical transmission, using a scoop control fluid coupling and four-speed Power-flow SSS (synchro-self-shifting) gearbox , was a Hudswell Clarke speciality. The D2/12 was mechanically similar to the earlier British Rail Class D2/7 but was of more modern appearance. The engine casing was lower, giving much better all-round visibility. D2519 was employed at NCB Hatfield Main, Doncaster, South Yorkshire as a shunter. It was located there until at least 1984. D2511 is preserved at the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway . List of British Rail classes
    8.33
    3 votes
    9
    GWR 1101 Class

    GWR 1101 Class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-4-0
    The GWR 1101 Class was a class of 0-4-0T side tank steam locomotives built by the Avonside Engine Company to the order of the Great Western Railway in 1926 for dock shunting. They passed into British Railways ownership in 1948 and were numbered 1101–1106. All were withdrawn in 1959–1960 and none is preserved.
    7.67
    3 votes
    10

    GWR Victoria Class

    • Wheel configuration: 2-4-0
    The Great Western Railway Victoria Class were 2-4-0 broad gauge steam locomotives for passenger train work. This class was introduced into service in two batches between August 1856 and May 1864. They were all withdrawn between 1876 and December 1880. The first eight locomotives were named after ruling heads of state, but the remaining locomotives received the names of famous engineers, starting with the railway's own Isambard Kingdom Brunel. This theme was continued with the Hawthorn Class that followed.
    6.33
    3 votes
    11
    Midland Railway 156 Class

    Midland Railway 156 Class

    • Wheel configuration: 2-4-0
    The Midland Railway 156 Class was a class of 2-4-0 tender engines built at Derby Works between 1866–1874. In total 29 of the class were built under the Midland Railway and 21 survived to become part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) fleet of engines in 1923. By then they were reduced to the humblest of roles. The LMS recognised the significance of the class and number 156 itself was ear-marked for preservation but the decision was over turned and the engine scrapped in 1932. However fifteen years later one of its classmates was spared. One, 158A survives as a static exhibit in the Midland Railway - Butterley in Butterley, Derbyshire. The surviving example is not in as built condition. It has twice been reboilered and the front end rebuilt. The original tender was replaced a century ago.
    8.00
    2 votes
    12
    GWR 1361 Class

    GWR 1361 Class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The 1361 Class were small 0-6-0ST steam locomotives built by the Great Western Railway at their Swindon railway works, England, mainly for shunting in docks and other sidings where track curvature was too tight for large locomotives. The 1361 Class were designed by Harold Holcroft, the Great Western Railway's Chief Draughtsman, by adapting the 1392 Class, originally built in 1874 for the Cornwall Minerals Railway, to conform to George Jackson Churchward's standardisation policy (Churchward was the Chief Mechanical Engineer). As such they combined unusual and outdated elements, such as saddle tanks and Allan valve gear, with current Great Western details such the cab. By 1910 the railway was busy converting all its old saddle tank locomotives to carry pannier tanks. The 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m) wheelbase allowed them to negotiate 2 chains (132 ft; 40 m) radius curves, a feature necessary for their intended duties in docks and on lightly laid branch lines. The five locomotives were built at Swindon in 1910 and were set to work alongside the ex-Cornwall Minerals Railway locomotives. Their usual home was Plymouth Millbay, Devon, (later Laira shed) from where they worked in Millbay Docks and
    7.50
    2 votes
    13
    GNR Class N2

    GNR Class N2

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-2
    The Great Northern Railway (GNR) Class N2 is an 0-6-2T side tank steam locomotive designed by Nigel Gresley and introduced in 1920. Further batches were built by the London and North Eastern Railway from 1925. They had superheaters and piston valves driven by Stephenson valve gear. Some locomotives were fitted with condensing apparatus for working on the Metropolitan Railway Widened Lines between King's Cross and Moorgate. The N2s were designed for suburban passenger operations, and worked most of the duties out of King's Cross and Moorgate, often hauling one or two quad-art sets of articulated suburban coaches. These ran to places such as New Barnet and Gordon Hill on the Hertford loop. They also hauled some empty coaching stock trains between King's Cross and Ferme Park carriage sidings. They were also a common sight in and around Glasgow and Edinburgh operating suburban services, mainly on what is today known as the North Clyde Line. British Railways numbers were: 69490-69596. One, No. 4744 (BR No. 69523) survives to preservation on the Great Central Railway. It is owned by the Gresley Society, and has appeared in both LNER Black and GNR Apple Green while in preservation.
    5.00
    3 votes
    14
    Caledonian Railway 782 Class

    Caledonian Railway 782 Class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The Caledonian Railway 782 Class was a class of 0-6-0T steam locomotives designed by John F. McIntosh and introduced in 1896. The 29 Class was similar but fitted with condensing apparatus. The locomotives were taken into London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) ownership in 1923 and into British Railways (BR) ownership in 1948.
    6.00
    2 votes
    15
    GER Class 527

    GER Class 527

    • Wheel configuration: 2-6-0
    The GER Class 527 was a class of fifteen 2-6-0 steam tender locomotives designed by William Adams for the Great Eastern Railway. This was the last design that Adams prepared for the GER, although they did not enter service until his successor Massey Bromley had taken office and incorporated some modifications to the design. In order to haul heavier trains and compete for the coal traffic into London, the GER asked William Adams to design a locomotive capable of hauling a train of 400 long tons net (700 tons gross). Tests were carried out with 265 class 4-4-0s to ensure that such trailing loads were feasible, followed by a prototype 2-6-0 number 527. Number 527 was the first locomotive in Britain to use the 2-6-0 wheel arrangement, and was named Mogul after the Great Moguls of Delhi, the epithet becoming the generic name for locomotives with that wheel arrangement. As was the GER's practice for locomotives built by outside contractors, the class was referred to by the number of the first locomotive, subsequent locos being numbered sequentially up to 541. They were used on coal trains from Peterborough to London, but were found uneconomic, and so had short lives, being withdrawn
    5.50
    2 votes
    16

    GWR Hercules Class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The Hercules Class were four broad gauge steam locomotives for the Great Western Railway. They were the first 0-6-0 locomotives, being built in 1842 by Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company. They were all withdrawn in 1870 and 1871. From about 1865, the Hercules Class locomotives became part of the Fury Class, along with the Premier Class locomotives.
    5.50
    2 votes
    17
    ATSF 3450 class

    ATSF 3450 class

    • Wheel configuration: 4-6-4
    The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway's 3450 class comprised ten 4-6-4 "Hudson" type steam locomotives built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1927. Built as coal-burners, they were converted to oil-burning during the 1930s. At the same time, the locomotives were given 79-inch driving wheels instead of their original 73-inch, and the boiler pressures increased from 220 to 230 lbf/in² (1.52 to 1.59 MPa). Combined, these changes reduced the starting tractive effort from 44,250 to 43,300 lbf (196.8 to 192.6 kN), but increased the top speed and efficiency. Their early service was in the Midwest, between Chicago, Illinois and Colorado; later, some were assigned to service in the San Joaquin Valley of California between Bakersfield and Oakland. They were smaller and less powerful locomotives than the later 3460 class, but were capable of equivalently high speeds. The first locomotive built, #3450, was donated by the Santa Fe in 1955 to the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society's Southern California chapter, and is preserved at the Society's museum in the Los Angeles County Fairgrounds at Pomona, California. It is not in operational condition but is preserved in good condition as
    7.00
    1 votes
    18
    GWR 7200 Class

    GWR 7200 Class

    • Wheel configuration: 2-8-2
    The Great Western Railway (GWR) 7200 Class is a class of 2-8-2T steam locomotive. These engines are the holders of several records: they were the first engines with a 2-8-2T wheel arrangement built in Britain, the only 2-8-2Ts to be built in Britain, and were the largest tank engines to run on the Great Western Railway. Originally the 4200 class and 5205 class 2-8-0T were introduced for short-haul Welsh coal traffic, but the Stock Market Crash of 1929 saw coal traffic dramatically fall. Built specifically for the short runs of heavy trains in the South Wales Coalfield, Collett took the agreed decision to rebuild some of them with an extended coal carrying capacity by adding 4 feet (1.2 m) to the frames, allowing the addition of a trailing wheel set, making them 2-8-2T. With the work carried out at Swindon Works, the first to be converted was 5275, which returned to traffic numbered 7200 in August 1934. Nos. 5276–94 were similarly rebuilt between August and November 1934, becoming 7201–19, and nos. 7220–39 were rebuilt from 5255–74 between August 1935 and February 1936; with both batches, the rebuilding was not in numerical order, but the new numbers were in the same sequence as the
    7.00
    1 votes
    19

    GWR Sharp, Roberts locomotives

    • Wheel configuration:
    The first 19 locomotives ordered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel for the Great Western Railway included three 2-2-2 Sharp, Roberts locomotives. They were built by Sharp, Roberts and Company and the most successful of the early designs, two lasting until the 1870s. The original 14-by-15-inch (356 × 381 mm) cylinders were replaced from 1844 by larger 14-by-18-inch (356 × 457 mm) or 15-by-18-inch (381 × 457 mm) ones.
    6.00
    1 votes
    20

    GWR Pyracmon Class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The Great Western Railway Pyracmon Class 0-6-0 broad gauge steam locomotives for goods train work. This class was introduced into service between November 1847 and April 1848, and withdrawn between August 1871 and December 1873. Bacchus was added to the class in May 1849 (and withdrawn in November 1869), having been constructed to broadly the same design from spare parts. From about 1865, Bacchus became part of the Fury Class, while the remaining locomotives became part of the Caesar Class.
    4.00
    2 votes
    21
    GER Class C53

    GER Class C53

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The GER Class C53 was a class of twelve 0-6-0T steam tram locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway. They passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping, and received the LNER classification J70. These locomotives had 12-by-15-inch (305 × 381 mm) outside cylinders driving 3-foot-1-inch (0.940 m) wheels; all enclosed by skirting. They were the first locomotives on the Great Eastern to use Walschaerts valve gear. They were used on the Wisbech and Upwell Tramway and the ports of Great Yarmouth and Ipswich from the 1930s to the 1950s. They replaced earlier GER Class G15 0-4-0 of similar appearance. The first withdrawal was in 1942. The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8216–8226 in 1944. The remaining eleven locomotives passed to British Railways in 1948 on nationalisation, and had 60000 added to their numbers. Withdrawals restarted in 1949, slowly at first, then more quickly, and the last went in 1955. The J70 was the inspiration for the character Toby the Tram Engine in The Railway Series by the Rev. W. Awdry, and the spin-off television series Thomas and Friends.
    5.00
    1 votes
    22
    GNR Class J13

    GNR Class J13

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The Great Northern Railway (GNR) Class J13, classified J52 by the LNER is a class of 0-6-0ST steam locomotive intended primarily for shunting. The Class J13 were introduced in 1897 designed by Henry Ivatt based on the earlier domeless GNR Class J14 (LNER Class J53). Eighty-five J13s were built up to 1909. Several J14s were rebuilt as J13s from 1922. Some locomotives were fitted with condensing apparatus for working on the Metropolitan Railway. Condensing apparatus was added to, or removed from, locomotives when they were allocated to, or away from, the London area. The LNER reclassified the J13 as J52. They also introduced two subclasses, J52/1 for the rebuilt engines and J52/2 for the originals. Forty-eight J52/1s and 85 J52/2s passed to British Railways in 1948 and they were numbered 68757–68889. One, 8846 was privately preserved by Captain. Bill Smith in 1959 and became the first locomotive to be privately preserved from BR. In 1980 it was donated to the National Railway Museum and made regular visits to other preserved railways and museums on its two Boiler Ticket durations in preservation.
    0.00
    0 votes
    23

    GWR 388 class

    • Wheel configuration: 0-6-0
    The GWR 388 class was a large class of 310 0-6-0 goods locomotives built by the Great Western Railway. They are sometimes referred to as the Armstrong Goods or Armstrong Standard Goods to differentiate from the Gooch Goods and Dean Goods classes, both of which were also large classes of standard goods locomotives. Despite their description as goods engines, for many years they were also used on passenger trains; the class that principally replaced them was Churchward's mixed-traffic 2-6-0s, the 4300 Class of 1919-21. They were used throughout the GWR system where the gauge permitted; principally in the Northern Division to start with. While the service overseas of Dean's 2301 Class during two world wars is well known, the service of the 388 Class in World War I is less often documented. Six of the class were sent to Serbia in 1916, two of them returning in 1921; and 16 of them were shipped to Salonika in 1917, though the first batch of eight was lost at sea. After the war four of them entered the stock of the Ottoman Railway; another four were returned to the GWR in 1921. The 388 class were built in several batches between 1866 and 1876; many locomotives were given numbers from
    0.00
    0 votes
    24

    LNER Class K5

    • Wheel configuration: 2-6-0
    The London and North Eastern Railway Class K5 consisted of a single rebuild of LNER Class K3 2-6-0 No. 206 (later No. 61863), rebuilt in 1945 by Edward Thompson. The rebuilt locomotive had a new boiler and two, instead of three, cylinders following earlier rebuilds of other Gresley designs. The clear aim of the rebuilds was to move away from the well established three cylinder policy achieving similar results through higher boiler pressure and two larger cylinders. Easier maintenance and greater availability was the objective.
    0.00
    0 votes
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