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Best Thoroughbred racehorse trainer of All Time

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    1

    Mathew Dawson

    Mathew Dawson (1820–1898) was a British racehorse trainer. In a career which lasted from 1840 until his death in 1898 he trained the winners of twenty-eight British Classic Races, a figure surpassed by only two other men. He was significant as one of the first trainers to run a public stable, rather than being the employee of a wealthy patron. He was based for most of his career at Newmarket, Suffolk. His first name is sometimes recorded as "Matthew", but "Mathew" is more usual. Dawson was born at his family’s home Stamford Hall, Gullane, Haddingtonshire in 1820. His father George Dawson, his elder brother Thomas and his younger brother John were all racehorse trainers. He was apprenticed to his father and worked in 1838 for his brother Thomas at his stables at Middleham, North Yorkshire. Dawson began training racehorses in Scotland in 1840, where his main patrons were Lord Kelburn and William Hope Johnstone. His most important winner in this period was The Era, who won the Northumberland Plate in 1845. He also sent a horse called Pathfinder to run in the Epsom Derby, but the horse finished last, almost a furlong behind the other runners. In 1846, Dawson moved to England to become
    8.29
    7 votes
    2

    Eddie Hayward

    Edward "Eddie" C. Hayward (February 13, 1903 – January, 1983) was a Canadian-born trainer in American Thoroughbred horse racing best known for winning the 1953 Kentucky Derby in which his colt Dark Star defeated Native Dancer. A native of Brighton, Ontario, he began his career as a jockey. In 1918 he was galloping horses at a racetrack in Saskatchewan where he would ride his first winner before leaving to compete in Spokane, Washington. He rode until around 1923 and after learning the art of horse conditioning for racing, in the latter part of the decade embarked on a training career. His first client was James Norris, owner of the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League, for whom he would win the 1938 Metropolitan Handicap with Danger Point. In 1928, Hayward returned temporarily to Canada where he won the Whittier Park Handicap. In 1940, Hayward trained a horse in California for Canadian-born actor Victor Jory and later was hired by Muriel Vanderbilt Adams for whom he trained Miche. Eddie Hayward moved to the East Coast of the United States in late 1952 to take over as head trainer for Harry Gugenheim's Cain Hoy Stable. Besides Dark Star, among the other Cain Hoy horses
    7.25
    8 votes
    3

    Cecil Boyd-Rochfort

    Sir Cecil Charles Boyd-Rochfort K.C.V.O. (1887-1983) was a British thoroughbred racehorse trainer who was British flat racing Champion Trainer five times. He was educated at Eton College and served with the Scots Guards during World War I, winning the Croix de Guerre reaching the rank of captain. Boyd-Rochfort's brother, George Boyd-Rochfort, also served with the Scots Guards during World War 1 and won the Victoria Cross. He trained for King George VI and then Queen Elizabeth II from 1943 until he retired in 1968, the same year in which he was knighted. His biggest royal wins were Pall Mall in the 1958 2,000 Guineas, Hypericum in the 1956 1,000 Guineas, Aureole in the 1954 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and Canisbay in the 1965 Eclipse Stakes. He trained at Newmarket's Freemason Lodge stables from 1923 to 1968. Brown Betty's 1933 Epsom Oaks win was his first classic, but his particular flair was for training stayers: Boswell's 1936 St. Leger triumph was the first of six final classic wins (from 13 entries). Boyd-Rochfort's only success in the Epsom Derby came in 1959 with Parthia. He was champion trainer in 1937, 1938, 1954, 1955 and 1958, and other top successes for his
    8.33
    6 votes
    4

    Pat Taaffe

    Pat Taaffe was a National Hunt jockey who famously rode Arkle to win three Cheltenham Gold Cups between 1964 and 1966. Arkle and Taaffe, the pair who dominated National Hunt racing in the mid-sixties, won the Irish National, the King George VI chase, 2 Hennessy Gold Cups, 3 Cheltenham Gold Cups and the Whitbread Cup. Taaffe was also a capable winner without the help of Arkle, he also won a fourth Gold Cup, 2 Grand Nationals and recorded 4 Irish Nationals. After retiring as a jockey Taaffe went on to train Captain Christy, 1974 Gold Cup winner, who was one of the only horses to be comapared with Arkle. Though his training skills were good, the former jockey was too modest for a trainer so his career did not flourish. He died in 1992 in Dublin Hospital, aged just 62. His health had been poor for some time.
    8.33
    6 votes
    5

    Barbara J. Minshall

    Barbara J. Minshall (born November 6, 1953 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and owner who has competed both in Canada and the United States. She is the widow of Aubrey W. Minshall, the successful breeder and owner of the 350-acre (1.4 km) Minshall Farms near Hillsburgh, Ontario. Following her husband's death in 1993, Barbara Minshall, having been involved in the operation of the farm, continued the business and became a licensed trainer in 1995. Ms. Minshall was raised around horses and as a young lady rode jumpers and qualified for the Canadian dressage team for the Summer Olympics and the Pan-American Games. In her first year as a trainer in Thoroughbred racing, Barbara Minshall became the first woman to train the winner of a Canadian Triple Crown race when the Minshall Farms colt Kiridashi won the Prince of Wales Stakes at Fort Erie Racetrack. She followed that up by being voted the 1996 Sovereign Award as Canada's outstanding trainer and her Minshall Farms won the Sovereign Award for Outstanding Breeder and Outstanding Owner. Among her other top horses have been Mt. Sassafras, Bold Ruritana, and Stephanotis. Mt. Sassafras was the 1996 Canadian
    7.00
    7 votes
    6

    Ron McAnally

    Ronald L. McAnally (born July 11, 1932, in Covington, Kentucky) is an American Hall of Fame trainer in Thoroughbred horse racing. Called "one of the most honored and respected of North American trainers" by Thoroughbred Times Co., Inc, as a child, he and his four siblings were placed in an orphanage following the death of their mother. As an adult, he regularly donates funds to the Covington Protestant Children's Home where he was raised. After high school, McAnally fulfilled his mandatory military service with the United States Air Force and attended the University of Cincinnati for two years, studying electrical engineering. He began his career in horse racing working at Rockingham Park racetrack in Salem, New Hampshire for his uncle, trainer Reggie Cornell. As a licensed trainer working at California racetracks, in 1958 he got his first win at Hollywood Park Racetrack and in 1960 at Santa Anita Park he got the first of his more than 2,000 stakes race wins. He is noted, perhaps because of his childhood experiences, for patiently looking after horses with unique quirks such as the one-eyed Cassaleria, and the tail-less Sea Cadet. As well, he conditioned Silver Ending, a
    8.80
    5 votes
    7

    Thomas Joseph Kelly

    Thomas Joseph Kelly (born September 23, 1919 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a United States Racing Hall of Fame trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses as well as an owner and breeder. Known as "Tommy," but commonly as "T. J.," in his teens Kelly began working at the Baltimore racetrack as did his younger brother Eddie. His learning of the business from the bottom up was interrupted by service with the United States military during World War II in which he received two Purple Hearts. Following his discharge, Kelly returned to Thoroughbred racing and obtained his trainer's license in 1945. From then until his retirement from training fifty-four years later in 1998, T. J. Kelly won numerous important races and conditioned sixty-five stakes race winners. Kelly conditioned several very successful horses for owner John M. Schiff including Plugged Nickle, the 1980 American Champion Sprint Horse, and Droll Role, a top runner on both dirt and grass and a winner of the 1972 Canadian International Stakes at Woodbine Racetrack in Canada and the Washington, D.C. International Stakes at the Laurel Park Racecourse in his native Maryland. Widely respected in the industry, in 1954, as the new head trainer
    7.33
    6 votes
    8

    Tom Albertrani

    Thomas "Tom" Albertrani (born March 21, 1958 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He began his career as a jockey then spent a number of years as an assistant to trainer Bill Mott. In 1995 Albertrani was hired as an assistant to head trainer Saeed bin Suroor at the prominent international Godolphin Racing stable based in Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. After working for Godolphin and the Maktoum family's related Darley Racing operations in Dubai, Australia, Japan and at various race tracks throughout Europe, in 2005 Albertrani returned to the New York City area and in addition to conditioning horses for Darley, he opened a public stable to take on horses from various owners. In 2006, Albertrani won the Tampa Bay and Ohio Derbys with Joseph LaCombe's Deputy Glitters and with Darley Racing's colt, Bernardini, he won five consecutive stakes races including the Preakness and Travers Stakes and the Jockey Club Gold Cup. That year he was voted a share of the Red Smith "Good Guy" Award with fellow trainer, Kiaran McLaughlin. His brother, Louis Albertrani, is also a Thoroughbred trainer.
    8.20
    5 votes
    9

    Mark Frostad

    Mark R. Frostad (born January 19, 1949 in Brantford, Ontario) is a Canadian Thoroughbred horse trainer. He grew up with a father who owned a stud farm but before becoming involved in thoroughbred horse racing, Frostad obtained a BA degree in literature from Princeton University then in 1976 an MBA degree from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario,. In 1991 he became actively involved in racing as a Thoroughbred trainer, meeting with great success in the employ of Sam-Son Farm whom he joined in 1995. Among his more than 100 stakes race victories, he won Canada's most prestigious horse race, the Queen's Plate, in 1996, 2000, 2001 and 2009 and both the Canadian International and the Breeders' Cup Turf in 1997. Mark has also had great success in both the second and third legs of the Canadian Triple Crown winning the Prince of Wales Stakes, three times (1994, 1997, 2000) and the Breeders' Stakes on four occasions (1995, 1996, 2002, 2012). Frostad has won the Sovereign Award for Outstanding Trainer three times. His significant horses include Quiet Resolve, Chief Bearhart, and Soaring Free, all winners of the Sovereign Award for Canadian Horse of the Year. Mark Frostad has
    8.00
    5 votes
    10

    Roger Charlton

    Roger J. Charlton (born 18 January 1950) is an English racehorse trainer and a former flat racing jockey. He trains horses in Beckhampton Stables in Wiltshire, England. He has had many successes as a trainer in England and Europe, including victories in both the Epsom Derby and the Prix du Jockey Club in 1990. He is recognized to be now one of the UK's top trainers. Jockey Steve Drowne has been employed by Charlton for many years. Great Britain France
    8.00
    5 votes
    11

    Colin Hayes

    Colin Sidney Hayes (AM) (OBE) (1924 – 21 May 1999) was a champion trainer of thoroughbred racehorses based in Adelaide, Australia. During his career he trained 5,333 winners including 524 individual Group or Listed winners. He won 28 Adelaide and 13 Melbourne Trainers' Premierships. Colin was born in Semaphore, South Australia in 1924. His father died when he was 10 years old. On leaving school he gained employment with the South Australian Electricity Trust as a boilermaker, but his love of horses soon led him to purchase a steeplechaser named Surefoot for £9. As an amateur rider, Colin rode Surefoot himself with his best result being a third in the 1948 Great Eastern Steeplechase run at Oakbank. Popular legend has it that Colin bet his honeymoon money on Surefoot, which ran third at odds of 60/1, enabling Colin to recoup the money and a little profit. His wife Betty was apparently very angry about the incident at the time. His son David followed in his footsteps and is a horse trainer. His other son was also a trainer, but Peter Hayes, who at the time was training Fields Of Omagh, died in an airplane crash in 2001. His initial moderate success with Surefoot drove Colin to expand
    6.00
    7 votes
    12

    Etienne L. de Mestre

    Etienne de Mestre (1832–1916), a 19th century trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses, was Australia's first outstanding racehorse trainer. In his 30 year career he experienced all the highs and the lows of the turf in a career which ended with him dependent on donations from racing friends. With the five wins de Mestre achieved in the Cup's first 18 years, he held the record for training the most Melbourne Cup winners for nearly 100 years. De Mestre won the first two Melbourne Cups with Archer in 1861 and 1862, and later trained a further three winners: Tim Whiffler (1867); Chester (1877); and Calamia (1878). He set a training record for Melbourne Cup winners which was finally broken by Bart Cummings in 1977. De Mestre also trained many other feature race winners including two AJC and two VRC Derbies and an Epsom Handicap. In recognition of his outstanding achievements, Etienne de Mestre was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Australian Racing Museum on 12 September 1992. One could best describe Etienne de Mestre as the "Bart Cummings" (the greatest of all Australian Racehorse trainers) of his day. Etienne was born in George Street, Sydney on 9 April 1832 in his parent's home, on
    6.83
    6 votes
    13

    Paul Nicholls

    Paul Nicholls (born 17 April 1962) is a British National Hunt horse trainer with stables at Ditcheat, Somerset. A relatively successful jump jockey, Nicholls has become the leading National Hunt trainer of his generation, finishing the 2007-2008 season with 155 winners and a record £4 million in prize money. To date, he has trained over 2000 winners, won the 2012 Grand National, four Cheltenham Gold Cups and has been crowned British jump racing Champion Trainer seven times. The son of a policeman, Nicholls was educated at Marlwood School, Alveston before leaving at 16 to take up work in a local point-to-point yard. He turned conditional in 1982 under the tutelage of Josh Gifford before joining David Barons in 1985, and became stable jockey in 1986. It was with Barons that Nicholls was most closely associated during his riding career. The pair enjoyed numerous big race successes, including back-to-back wins in the Hennessy Gold Cup at Newbury with Broadheath in 1986 and Playschool the following year. Playschool also won the 1987 Welsh Grand National, and the 1988 Irish Hennessey with Nicholls. Playschool was subsequently made favourite for the 1988 Cheltenham Gold Cup but was pulled
    7.80
    5 votes
    14

    Jack Denham

    Jack Denham (24 August 1924 – 14 December 2009) was a leading Australian horse trainer and businessman. A member of a Sydney training dynasty, Denham first rode as a jockey for his brother, and then took out his own training licence in 1948. Denham’s training career took off when he became trainer for Stan Fox at Nebo Lodge, a position he held for 10 years, training over 1,000 winners. For six successive years, from 1971 to 1976, he was runner-up on the Sydney trainers’ premiership table. He was to win the premiership later in 1990–91 and 1992–93. From 1980 onwards Denham was closely associated with owners Geoff and Beryl White, for whom he won a Golden Slipper with Marscay, an Epsom Handicap, Yalumba Stakes and other group races with Filante, and an Australian Guineas and AJC Oaks with Triscay. His greatest triumphs came in 1997 and 1998 when the Denham trained Might and Power took out the Melbourne Cup, Caulfield Cup and Cox Plate. On 14 December 2009 Jack Denham died at the age of 85 after a long illness.
    7.60
    5 votes
    15

    Frank McCabe

    Frank Reilly McCabe (born June 30, 1927) was an American basketball player who competed in the 1952 Summer Olympics. McCabe played collegiately at Marquette University. He was part of the American basketball team, which won the gold medal. He played seven matches.
    10.00
    3 votes
    16

    Hirsch Jacobs

    Hirsch Jacobs (April 8, 1904 - February 23, 1970) was an American thoroughbred horse trainer and owner. Jacobs was the leading race-winning trainer in the United States 1933-39, 1941–44, the U.S. leading money-winning trainer, 1946, 1960, 1965, and the U.S. leading money-winning breeder, 1964-67. During his career, he saddled 3,596 winners. In 1958, Hirsch Jacobs was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Hirsch Jacobs and his wife Ethel owned a number of horses which were raced under her name. In 1970, the Jacobs family won two of the U.S. Triple Crown races, capturing the Preakness and Belmont Stakes. They won the Preakness with Personality, who earned American Horse of the Year honors, and the Belmont with High Echelon. Both horses were owned by Ethel Jacobs and trained by their son, John. Their daughter, Patrice, became involved in the sport. She married Louis Wolfson and their Harbor View Farm owned and bred the 1978 American Triple Crown champion, Affirmed. Hirsch Jacobs died in 1970 in Miami Beach, Florida. He had lived with his wife in Forest Hills, Queens.
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    6.50
    6 votes
    18

    Robert L. Wheeler

    Robert L. Wheeler (June 21, 1920 - April 12, 1992) was American Hall of Fame trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. A native of Crawford, Nebraska, Robert Wheeler trained professionally from 1938 through to his death at age 71 in 1992. Among his successful runners, Wheeler conditioned the 1959 American Champion Three-Year-Old Filly, Silver Spoon as well as Track Robbery who was voted the 1982 American Champion Older Female Horse.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Tom Smith

    Tom Smith

    Robert Thomas "Tom" Smith (May 20, 1878 – January 23, 1957) was an American thoroughbred race horse trainer. Born in a log cabin in the backwoods of northwest Georgia, as a young man he trained horses for the Croatian Cavalry and worked on a cattle ranch. In 1934, he was hired as a trainer by the wealthy businessman Charles S. Howard. Known as "Silent Tom" because of his quiet nature, Smith would become famous as the trainer of Seabiscuit. In the 1940s, he was hired to train for Maine Chance Farm, owned by cosmetics tycoon Elizabeth Arden. Twice he was the U.S. Champion Trainer by earnings: first in 1940, and again in 1945. On November 8, 1945, Smith was suspended from racing for a year by The Jockey Club after being found responsible for administering the stimulant ephedrine via an atomizer to one of his horses. The drug was given to the horse by the stable foreman without Smith's specific authorization, but under New York racing rules he was held responsible as the horse's trainer. In his absence, Roy Waldron trained for a time for Maine Chance Farm, winning the Pimlico Futurity with Star Pilot, before Smith's 36 year old son, Jimmy, took over for the remainder of the
    9.67
    3 votes
    20
    Billy Turner

    Billy Turner

    William H. "Billy" Turner, Jr. (born February 29, 1940) is a successful American Thoroughbred flat racing trainer who is best known for winning the United States Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing in 1977 with Seattle Slew, and is currently is the world's only living Triple Crown winning trainer. Turner maintains a public training stable and bloodstock consulting services, operating mainly in New York, Florida and the Mid-Atlantic region. In recent years he has been based out of Belmont Park and Saratoga Racetrack in New York, and Palm Meadows Thoroughbred Training Center in Florida, training horses that compete on the New York Racing Association circuit, at Gulfstream Park, and other racing venues along the U.S. East coast. Born in Rochester, New York, Turner grew up riding and fox hunting in Pennsylvania's horse country and began his career with racehorses as a steeplechase jockey while still a teenager. Working under Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame steeplechase trainer Burley Cocks, Turner rode first over jumps from 1958 to 1963 and then, when his 6’2” height made race-riding unrealistic, continued as an assistant-trainer until 1966. At the age of 26, Turner went into business
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    Willie Mullins

    Willie Mullins (born 5 September 1956) is an Irish racehorse trainer and former jockey. He is based at Closutton, Muine Bheag, County Carlow, Ireland He commenced racehorse training in 1988 having previously worked as an assistant to his father Paddy Mullins and Jim Bolger. Willie is a former six times amateur champion jockey in Ireland, winning the 1983 Aintree Fox Hunters on Atha Cliath and the 1996 Cheltenham Bumper on Wither Or Which. He is the trainer of the 2005 Grand National winner Hedgehunter and the 2011 Champion Hurdle winner Hurricane Fly and trained the horse, On His Own in the 2012 Grand National . He is also trainer of the three times David Nicholson Mares' Hurdle champion, Quevega. and Ballymore Properties Novices' Hurdle champion, Mikael d'Haguenet. Statistics on Mullins' performance are here
    7.00
    5 votes
    22

    Ernie T. Poulos

    Ernest T. Poulos (February 18, 1926 - March 30, 1997) was an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. A native of Chicago, he conditioned horses at local tracks for many years but gained national attention when he took over the training of Black Tie Affair in 1989. Poulos guided the three-year-old colt through three highly successful years, capped off in 1991 with a win in the Breeders' Cup Classic and United States Horse of the Year honors. Such was the admiration for Ernie Poulos in Chicago that when he died in 1997, his funeral was held at the Arlington Park race track. For his significant contribution to the Thoroughbred racing industry, in 2000 he was the posthumous recipient of the Governor's Award from the Racing Industry Charitable Foundation (RICF).
    9.33
    3 votes
    23

    Guy Harwood

    Guy Harwood (born June 10, 1939 in Pulborough, West Sussex, England) is a retired British racehorse trainer. Harwood was born in Pulborough, West Sussex, in 1939. His father, Wally made the family fortune with his garage business, founded in 1931. Harwood began riding at the age of 18 and won 40 point-to-point races and 14 National Hunt races over the next few years. He began training horses in 1965 under permit, and took out a training license in 1966, establishing the Coombelands racing stables. In the 1970's, Harwood developed his stable to become one of the most modern in Britain, introducing such innovations as artificial gallops, American-style barns and a computerised office system. He trained many winners there, including Dancing Brave, winner of the 1986 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe and European Horse of the Year for 1986. In 1996 his daughter, Amanda Perrett, took over the reins at Coombelands. Harwood received the prestigious Goodwood Racecourse Media Dinner Award for 2007.
    8.00
    4 votes
    24

    Kazuo Fujisawa

    Kazuo Fujisawa (藤澤 和雄, Fujisawa Kazuo) (born September 22, 1951 in Tomakomai, Hokkaido, Japan) is a trainer of Thoroughbred race horses. He has been a licensed trainer in Japan since 1987 and since 1993 has won the training title eleven times. He has trained three horses that were voted Japanese Horse of the Year on four occasions: Taiki Shuttle (1998), Symboli Kris S (2002, 2003) and Zenno Rob Roy (2004). Currently Fujisawa is the trainer of Casino Drive who won the 2008 Peter Pan Stakes at Belmont Park in New York. France Japan
    8.00
    4 votes
    25

    Sid C. Attard

    Sid C. Attard (born September 29, 1950 in Birkirkara, Malta) is a Canadian horse trainer in Thoroughbred horse racing. Members of his family emigrated to Canada in the 1960s where older brothers Joseph and Tino Attard became racehorse trainers and Larry became one of the top jockeys in the country and a member of the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. A trainer since 1977, Attard is based at Toronto's Woodbine Racetrack, where he has led all trainers in wins four times. On December 6, 2008 he won his 1,600th career race with Forever Gleaming. On November 14/2010 he won his 1,700th career race in the Autumn Stakes with Stunning Stag. In February 2011, the Brampton Guardian announced that Sid would be a 2011 inductee of the Brampton Sports Hall Of Fame. A resident of Bramalea, Ontario, Attard and his wife Janice have three children. Their son Paul has followed in his father's footsteps and is a trainer at Woodbine Racetrack. Second oldest and only daughter Stephanie is a chef, and their youngest son, Jamie, is an assistant trainer to Sid.
    8.00
    4 votes
    26

    Woody Stephens

    Woody Stephens (September 1, 1913 - August 22, 1998) was an American Thoroughbred horse racing Hall of Fame trainer. Born Woodford Cefis Stephens in Stanton, Kentucky, he had a younger brother named William Ward Stephens who also became a successful trainer. Woody Stephens started in racing as a jockey at age 16 but within a few years switched to training horses. After working as an assistant for several years, in the late 1930s he started training on his own, taking on horses from various owners. Near the end of the 1950s, he was hired by the wealthy Harry Guggenheim as head trainer for his Cain Hoy Stable. The moved proved very successful, with Stephens training several champions and winning a number of major stakes races, including the Kentucky Oaks three times. He remained with the Guggenheim operation for ten years before returning to run his own stable again in 1966. In a career that spanned seven decades, Stephens trained eleven Eclipse Award winners, and his horses won over a hundred Grade 1 stakes races. Among his most notable horses was Henryk de Kwiatkowski's colt Conquistador Cielo, the winner of the 1982 Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year. Although Stephens trained
    8.00
    4 votes
    27

    Edward A. Neloy

    Edward Albert "Eddie" Neloy (May 15, 1924 - May, 1971) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. At age fourteen, he began working at a racetrack then joined the United States Army during World War II. During the intense action in the Italian Campaign following Operation Shingle, Neloy was seriously wounded in Anzio and lost an eye. When the war ended, Neloy returned to work in the horse racing industry and as a trainer in 1945 won the first race of a successful career that lasted until his death in 1971. In the mid 1950s he trained for Maine Chance Farm and in 1964 was voted the National Turf Writers Trainer of the Year following an outstanding season that included Gedney Farms' outstanding colt, Gun Bow. In 1966, Eddie Neloy was chosen by the Phipps family to replace the retiring Bill Winfrey as their head trainer. Neloy was responsible for conditioning the horses of Gladys Mills Phipps' Wheatley Stable, those of her son, Ogden Phipps, and her grandson, Dinny Phipps. In his first year, Neloy met with outstanding success, including winning thirteen straight races with Buckpasser who was voted American Horse of the Year honors. During the five years he was with the Phipps
    6.80
    5 votes
    28

    Freddy Head

    Freddy Head (born 19 June 1947, in Neuilly, France) is a retired champion jockey in Thoroughbred horse racing and currently a horse trainer. Known also as "Freddie", his grandfather was a jockey as was his father Alec Head who also became a successful trainer and owner of Haras du Quesnay near Deauville. Alec Head's horses won the Epsom Derby and the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. In the 1976 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, Freddie Head rode to victory on a horse trained by his father and in 1979 took another win on a horse trained by his highly successful sister, Christiane "Criquette" Head. A six-time winner of the French jockey's championship, Freddie Head scored a number of important Group I wins in the United Kingdom and is best known to Americans for his back-to-back victories aboard U.S. Hall of Fame filly Miesque in the 1987 and 1988 Breeders' Cup Mile. Freddie Head retired as a jockey in 1997 and began working as a trainer. In 2008, he became the first man ever to win Breeders' Cup races as both a jockey and trainer when Goldikova won the Mile. France Canada Germany Great Britain Ireland Italy United States France Great Britain United States
    9.00
    3 votes
    29

    Jeremy Noseda

    Jeremy Noseda (born 17 September 1963) is a British racehorse trainer. After six years working for John Dunlop, and five years as assistant to John Gosden, he joined Sheikh Mohammed's Godolphin operation in late 1993, and played a significant role in training such horses as Lammtarra, Halling and Balanchine. He started training under his own name in January 1996, initially in California, then returning to Britain in late 1997. He is based at the Shalfleet stables in Newmarket formerly occupied by Paul Kelleway. He enjoyed his first Classic victory when Araafa won the Irish 2,000 Guineas in 2006. His first triumph in an English Classic came the same year with Sixties Icon winning the St Leger at York. Jeremy was educated at Jesuit-run Catholic school, Stonyhurst College. He got his big break in 2004 when he won the Breeders' Cup on Wilko. Great Britain Ireland United States
    9.00
    3 votes
    30

    Bill Mott

    William I. "Bill" Mott (born July 29, 1953, in Mobridge, South Dakota) is an American horse trainer, most notable for his work with Cigar. Mott earned the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer in 1995 and 1996. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1998 at the age of 45, becoming the second-youngest trainer ever inducted, after D.M. "Mikey" Smithwick (at 42 in 1971). Mott started training thoroughbreds at age 15 and won the South Dakota Futurity with Kosmic Tour before he was out of high school. He worked his way up the ranks by becoming first an exercise rider, then an assistant trainer for Hall of Fame Trainer Jack Van Berg. In 1976, Mott, trainer Frank Brothers (who was also Van Berg's assistant trainer), and a stable crew guided Van Berg's horses through the wins at Sportsman's, Hawthorne and Arlington Park race tracks in Chicago. They were so successful that Van Berg was named leading trainer at Arlington Park and leading trainer in the Nation with 496 wins in 1976, a record that stood until Steve Asmussen broke it in 2003 with 555 wins. Asmussen broke his own record in 2008 and 2009. Mott worked as an assistant trainer for Van Berg for three
    7.75
    4 votes
    31

    David Elsworth

    David Elsworth (born 1939) is a horse trainer living in the United Kingdom. He is perhaps best known for being the trainer of Desert Orchid, 1988 Grand National winner Rhyme 'n' Reason and 1990 Queen Mother Champion Chase winner Barnbrook Again - just three horses amongst a host of top-class performers over jumps and on the flat. He also trained Persian Punch to win multiple staying races on the flat, whilst his sole classic success came with the 1990 Irish 1000 Guineas with In The Groove.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    7.75
    4 votes
    33

    Jamie Sanders

    Jamie Sanders (born in Brownsville, Kentucky) is a former American Thoroughbred horse racing jockey and current trainer. She is the trainer of Teuflesberg who won the 2007 Southwest Stakes and finished 17th in the 2007 Kentucky Derby. In fulfilling her childhood dream of training a Derby horse, Sanders is only the 13th woman to do so in its more than 130-year history.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34

    Rodney Rash

    Rodney R. Rash (July 14, 1959 - March 1, 1996) was an American trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. Born in Frederick, Maryland, Rash grew up on a dairy farm and was exposed to the sights and sounds of Thoroughbred horse racing when he helped his father deliver hay to horse farms and racetracks. Rash left home at age sixteen and found work as a hot walker with the Santa Anita Park racing operations of renowned U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer, Charlie Whittingham. During his early working years, Rodney Rash went through a self-destructive wild period when alcohol and drug abuse became a problem. As recounted by Jay Hovdey, author of Charlie Whittingham's biography and an acclaimed racing journalist, Whittingham's son Taylor died as a result of drug abuse and he took Rash under his wing. Associates of Rash also told reporters how Whittingham had been very patient with the young man, bailing him out of jail and making reparations for the damage Rash had done. By 1987, the then twenty-eight-year-old Rash had turned his life around and dedicated himself to his training duties. He worked his way up to become Whittingham's head assistant then in April 1991 opened his own training
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    Jeremy Tree

    Arthur Jeremy Tree, (21 December 1925 - 7 March 1993) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born into a prominent London, England family, Tree was always known by his middle name, Jeremy. His father was Ronald Tree, an American-born British journalist, investor and Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for the Harborough constituency in Leicestershire. His mother, Nancy Lancaster, was a niece of the MP Nancy Astor through whom young Jeremy would be introduced to the sport of Thoroughbred racing. Jeremy Tree embarked on a career in racing in 1947 and became an assistant to the trainer Richard Warden. He began training on his own at Newmarket Racecourse in 1952 then the following set relocated to stables at Beckhampton, Wiltshire. He won his first Classic in 1963 when Only for Life captured the 2,000 Guineas Stakes. His went on to win three more Classics, taking the Epsom Oaks with Juliette Marny in 1975 and Scintillate in 1979, then a second 2,000 Guineas Stakes in 1980 with Known Fact. Among his other top runners, Jeremy Tree trained Rainbow Quest to wins in the 1985 Coronation Cup and the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. During his career, Jeremy Tree conditioned horses for
    7.50
    4 votes
    36

    Lucien Laurin

    Lucien Laurin (March 18, 1912 in Joliette, Quebec, Canada – June 26, 2000 at Key Largo, Florida) was a French-Canadian jockey and Hall of Fame Thoroughbred horse trainer. Laurin's career in Thoroughbred horse racing began in 1929 as a jockey at Blue Bonnets Raceway in Montreal, Quebec. Battling weight problems, after riding 161 race winners, in 1942 he began working as a trainer in New England, a job that would span 45 years and take him to the pinnacle of horse racing success. While working for two different stables, he enjoyed a long and successful association with owner Reginald N. Webster. For Webster, Laurin trained a number of winners including Quill, the 1958 American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly, and Amberoid, who won the 1966 Wood Memorial Stakes and gave Laurin his first of six American Classics, the Belmont Stakes. His son, Roger Laurin, worked as a trainer at Christopher Chenery's Meadow Stable and when Roger accepted an offer to work for Ogden Phipps, he suggested to Chenery that his father might help them on a temporary basis. Coming out of retirement in 1971, Lucien Laurin went to work at the Meadow Stable for what was supposed to be a temporary period. At that time,
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Oscar White

    Oscar White was an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer who twice won the third leg of the United States Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing. In 1941, he took over training duties for the prominent racing stable of Walter and Sarah Jeffords when Buddy Hirsch left to serve in World War II with the United States Army. Oscar White's best horses were:
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    Tom Bohannan

    Thomas K. Bohannan (born c.1955 in Mobile, Alabama) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He grew up in Lexington, Kentucky and as a young man became a hotwalker, groom, and racing stable foreman. In 1989 he became the private trainer for the successful Loblolly Stable of Lake Hamilton, Arkansas. With Loblolly, Tom Bohannan had two horses successfully compete in the U.S. Triple Crown series. In 1992, Pine Bluff finished fifth in the Kentucky Derby, won the Preakness Stakes and was third in the Belmont. The following year Prairie Bayou finished second in the Derby, then gave Tom Bohannan his second consecutive victory in the Preakness. Fatally injured in the Belmont, Prairie Bayou was posthumously voted 1993's U.S. Champion 3-Year-old Colt. Unfortunately for Bohannan, a year later Loblolly Stable owner John Ed Anthony and his ex-wife disbanded the operation and Bohannan set up a public stable. Beset with personal problems, in the early part of the 2000s (decade) Bohannan left racing for several years but came back in 2006 when he began training again for former Loblolly owner John Ed Anthony who now races under the name Shortleaf Stable. After a difficult year in which they
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    8.67
    3 votes
    40

    John Hertler

    John O. Hertler (born September 17, 1950 in Ridgewood, Queens) is an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. He was fifteen years old when he began working for Hall of Fame trainer Phil Johnson with whom he remained for thirteen years. In 1978 he went out on his own, training horses he purchased as well as for others. John Hertler trained Ballindaggin, who won the inaugural running of the Molson Export Challenge (Woodbine Mile) in 1988 and Slew the Dragon who won the 1988 Hollywood Derby. He has twice won the Ashley T. Cole Handicap in 1999 and 2006. However, he is best known as the trainer of the Eclipse Award winner and Hall of Fame colt, Slew o' Gold.
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    Steve Gollings

    Steve Gollings is a racehorse trainer based is in Scamblesby, near Louth, in Lincolnshire. Before entering training Gollings dealt with used cars. Gollings' best jumps horse to date is Royal Shakespeare. The horse had a very successful Novice season which included 3 straight wins and a second to Brave Inca in a Grade 1 Novice Hurdle in Ireland, he was disappointing the following year. In 2006 Royal Shakespeare won the Order of Merit. The year after this the horse was sent novice chasing. Gollings trained the horse, Mr Shambles (Kevin Tobin) who won at Market Rasen in 2008.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42

    Toby Balding

    Gerald Barnard Balding, Jr. OBE (born 23 September 1936), known as Toby Balding, is a retired British racehorse trainer. He was born in the United States where his father, Gerald Barnard Balding, Sr., ran a polo team and is part of a famous racing family. His brother, Ian Balding, also a retired trainer, trained Mill Reef to win the Epsom Derby. Toby went to Marlborough College. He achieved success with both flat and National Hunt horses. He first began training in 1956, he was only 19, and his first winners were Bower Chalk at Ascot Racecourse (Flat) and The Quiet Man at Wincanton Racecourse (jumps). He finally retired on the final day of the 2004 Flat season and is one of the few men to have trained the winner of the Grand National, the Cheltenham Gold Cup and the Champion Hurdle. In total he trained over 2,000 winners. On 12 December 2006 he was elected an Honorary Member of the Jockey Club and he is currently (April 2008) a Director of the British Horseracing Authority He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2011 New Year Honours for services to horse racing.
    8.67
    3 votes
    43

    Henrietta Knight

    Henrietta Catherine Knight (born 15 December 1946) is an English Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Knight is best known as a trainer of National Hunt racehorses. An Oxford graduate, Knight formerly worked as a teacher of Biology and History before becoming a trainer. She was a prominent figure in the equestrian sport of eventing, finishing 12th at the Badminton Horse Trials in 1973, and becoming the chairperson of the British Olympic Horse Trials Selection Committee from 1984 to 1988. This period included the selection of the Silver Medal winning team for the Seoul Olympics. Knight began training under rules in 1989 having previously trained over 100 winners on the amateur point-to-point circuit from 1984 to 1989. Her training base is a farm in Lockinge, near Wantage in Oxfordshire. Henrietta married former champion National Hunt jockey Terry Biddlecombe in 1995 and has no children. Both are recovered alcoholics. Among her better known victories were training the triple Cheltenham Gold Cup winner Best Mate, and the Queen Mother Champion Chase winner Edredon Bleu. Both horses also won the King George VI Chase and were owned by Jim Lewis and his late wife Valerie. Among her other
    6.40
    5 votes
    44

    Kelly Breen

    Kelly John Breen (born May 13, 1969 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey) is a trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. On June 11, 2011, Breen won the most important race of his career when Ruler on Ice won the third leg of the U.S. Triple Crown series, the Belmont Stakes.
    5.50
    6 votes
    45

    David Hall

    David Hall (born 27 October 1963 in Adelaide, South Australia) is an Australian horse trainer. The son of trainer, Joe Hall, he obtained his trainer's license in 1988 at Morphettville. In 1993, he moved to race in Melbourne where he became famous for training Makybe Diva to the first of her three successive Melbourne Cup victories in 2003. David Hall was granted a trainer license by the Hong Kong Jockey Club in 2004.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46

    Jeff Mullins

    Jeff Mullins (born March 27, 1963 in Murray, Utah) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer.
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    John Gosden

    John Gosden

    John Gosden (born on 30 March 1951 in Sussex, England) is a racehorse trainer. Having trained over 2,000 winners since his return to England in 1989, including winners of the Breeders' Cup Classic, the Derby, the King George, the 1,000 Guineas and the St. Leger, he is generally considered one of the most successful racehorse trainers of his generation. He trains at Clarehaven Stables in Newmarket, England. He graduated from Cambridge University, where he studied Economics and met his future wife, Rachel Hood, a lawyer. At Cambridge, he was a successful sportsman and won blues for both discus and javelin. Gosden started as assistant to two of the most successful trainers in the history of racing, first to champion trainer Vincent O’Brien and later, Sir Noel Murless. During his time with both men, they won a number of prestigious races including The Derby, The Oaks and the St. Leger Stakes. He then moved to California, becoming assistant to Tommy Doyle, before attaining an American Horse Training license in 1979. In 1983 he trained Bates Motel (horse), a Handicap race horse. Bates Motel (horse) won the prestigious Santa Anita Handicap, the San Antonio Handicap and Philip H. Iselin
    7.25
    4 votes
    48

    Peter Chapple-Hyam

    Peter Chapple-Hyam (born 2 April 1963 in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, England) is a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He trained Dr Devious to win the Epsom Derby in 1992 and repeated the feat with Authorized in 2007. He managed two Group One wins in his first season as a trainer in 1991. Away from racing he is a keen supporter of West Bromwich Albion F.C. Chapple-Hyam trained in Hong Kong between 1999 and 2003. Great Britain France Ireland Italy
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Peter Walwyn

    Peter Tyndall Walwyn MBE (born 1 July 1933) is a retired British racehorse trainer. He was based at stables at in the Lambourn, Berkshire, area and enjoyed his period of greatest success in the mid 1970s when he was British flat racing Champion Trainer twice. Walwyn comes from a racing family - he is the cousin of trainer Fulke Walwyn. He was educated at Charterhouse School and his first job in racing was as assistant to trainer Geoffrey Brooke. In October 1960 he took out a licence to train and in 1965 he moved to the stables at Seven Barrows where he spent the majority of his career. Towards the end of his career he moved to Windsor House stables in Lambourn. His principal stable jockeys were Duncan Keith, Pat Eddery and Joe Mercer. He was one of the leading trainers in Britain during the 1970s, winning the Champion Trainer title in both 1974 and 1975. The most notable horse he trained was Grundy, winner of the Epsom Derby, Irish Derby and King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes in 1975. He retired as a trainer in 1999 but remains involved in horse racing organisations, and as at February 2011 is Chairman of the Lambourn Trainers Association. He was elected to honorary
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    Geoff Wragg

    Geoff Wragg (born 9 January 1930) was a Thoroughbred horse trainer who trained champion horses such as Teenoso and Jeune. He is the son of former jockey and trainer Harry Wragg, from whom he took over the licence at Abington Place, Newmarket in 1983 upon his father's retirement. Wragg retired in 2008 after 25 years of training. Part of Abington Place is currently being used by Jane Chapple-Hyam as a part of her training set up from 2009. Many overseas raiders also make use of the facilities during the summer months (usually around Royal Ascot time), most notably in recent times crack Australian sprinting mare Black Caviar and fellow compatriot Ortensia, both of whom were stabled at the yard during the summer of 2012. Wragg's father, Harry, was an extremely successful jockey and trainer, and the pair would be renowned for being the first to trial electronic timing equipment on the gallops as well as weighing their horses. His riding career was littered with success, winning all five domestic Classics - almost repeating the feat as a trainer with only the Epsom Oaks eluding him (trained the runner-up in 1974, ironically with the future dam of Teenoso, Furioso). Harry retired in 1982,
    8.33
    3 votes
    52

    Neil Drysdale

    Neil D. Drysdale (born 11 December 1947, Haslemere, Surrey, England) is an American based thoroughbred race horse trainer. Based in Playa Del Rey, California, he has won two Triple Crown races - the Belmont Stakes (G1) with A.P. Indy in 1992 and the Kentucky Derby (G1) with Fusaichi Pegasus in 2000. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 2000. Born in Haslemere, Surrey, his father was a Royal Marine who served with the U.S. Marines in Korea. Drysdale studied at the University of Barcelona, and then taught English as a foreign language - but then switched his mind to horses. He moved to Florida to work with show horses, and then became involved with racing thoroughbreds, spending two years with John Hartigan at Tartan Farms in Ocala, Florida. He then moved to a thoroughbred stable in Argentina, then managed a stud farm in Venezuela. Drysdale returned to the United States and worked as an assistant to Roger Laurin for two years, and then between 1970-74 he was assistant to Charlie Whittingham in California. He says the most important things he learned from Whittingham were patience and planning. He began working for Corbin Robertson's Saron Stable in
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    8.33
    3 votes
    54

    Frank "Pancho" Martin

    Frank "Pancho" Martin (December 3, 1925 – July 18, 2012) was a United States' Hall of Fame trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. He is often remembered as the trainer of Sham, the horse that placed second to Secretariat in two legs of the 1973 U. S. Triple Crown series. Martin was the racing industry's leading purse winner in 1974, and the leading trainer in New York state from 1973 to 1982. Martin was born in Cuba. He began working at the track when he was 12 years old, starting as a hotwalker (walking horses after a run or workout), and achieving status as a trainer by the age of 16. While he cannot recall the name of his first winning horse in Cuba, he was racing Cuban horses in Ohio, Florida, and New England by the time he was 21. By 1951, Martin had moved to the United States and settled in New York. Since then some of his major victories have included: Manassa Mauler, who won the Wood Memorial Stakes in 1959; Never Bow, the Brooklyn Handicap winner in 1971; Hitchcock, the Suburban Handicap winner in 1972; Autobiography, who was the nation's Top Older Horse in 1972; Rube the Great, who won the Wood Memorial in 1974; Outstandingly, who won both the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies
    9.50
    2 votes
    55

    Ivan Allan

    Ivan Allan (16 January 1941 – 4 November 2009) was a champion race horse trainer and businessman. Allan became the subject of controversy after being romantically involved for over ten years with actress Glory Annen Clibbery. After a domestic violence incident in July 2000 Clibbery ended the relationship. Allan hired an attorney when Clibbery refused to vacate the Piccadilly home they both lived in for over a decade. Allan died at age 68 in Singapore.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Mark Johnston

    Mark Johnston (born October 10, 1959) is a racehorse trainer based in Middleham, North Yorkshire, England. In 2004 he won the 1,000 Guineas with Attraction. Other successful horses he has trained are Mister Baileys, winner of the 2,000 Guineas, Shamardal, 2004 European Champion Two-Year-Old, and Double Trigger, winner of the Ascot Gold Cup. Johnston has been training in Middleham since 1988 when he purchased Kingsley House (often falsely attributed to be the former home of Charles Kingsley, author of The Water Babies). His success is at least in part due to the fantastic natural facilities available to him and other Middleham based trainers on the nearby gallops. Johnston's horses are known for their front running style and bravery in a finish, two attributes that were best advertised by the exploits of Attraction. The motto of the stable is "Always Trying". Great Britain Germany Ireland Italy United Arab Emirates
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Pascal Bary

    Pascal Bary (born April 4, 1953) is a French racehorse trainer. He has been training since 1981, having previously worked as an assistant to François Boutin. He is based at Chantilly, Oise. Dubai France Great Britain Ireland Singapore United States
    7.00
    4 votes
    58

    David Hayes

    David A. Hayes (born 22 October 1962) is a prominent Australian Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and son of trainer Colin Hayes. Hayes has trained a total of 78 Group One winners, (60 in Australia, 17 in Hong Kong and 1 in Japan) including Melbourne Cup, Cox Plate, Caulfield Cup and Golden Slipper winners. David Hayes became the youngest member to be admitted into the Australian Racing Hall of Fame in 2008. David has trained in excess of 2800 winners.
    6.00
    5 votes
    59

    Gai Waterhouse

    Gai Waterhouse (maiden name Gabriel Marie Smith, born 2 September 1954) is a Scottish-born, Australian resident horse trainer, businesswoman and a former actress. Waterhouse was educated at the Kincoppal-Rose Bay School in Sydney, and completed a Bachelor of Arts at the University of New South Wales in 1975. The daughter of Randwick racehorse trainer T.J. Smith, she made a name for herself as a model and actor, including in the Australian drama The Young Doctors before moving to England and appearing in the Doctor Who story The Invasion of Time. She then returned to Australia where she served an apprenticeship under her father for fifteen years before getting her own trainer's licence. She was granted her Australian Jockey Club licence in January 1992, although this was made difficult as her husband, Robbie Waterhouse, was banned over his involvement in the Fine Cotton scandal. AJC rules at the time stipulated that the spouse of a banned person could not be licensed, although this was subsequently overturned. Her first winner was the horse Gifted Poet in March 1992, and her first Group One winner was Te Akau Nick in the Metropolitan Handicap in October that year. After T.J. Smith
    6.00
    5 votes
    60

    Kevin Prendergast

    Kevin Prendergast (born c. 1951, Verdun, Quebec) was the Assistant General Manager for the National Hockey League's Edmonton Oilers. Prendergast was also the former Vice President of Hockey Operations and former head scout for the Edmonton Oilers. He replaced Barry Fraser in the year 2000, and aside from Ales Hemsky whom he drafted in 2001, his drafting record during his tenure was abysmyl, and is probably the biggest factor in the oilers current struggles. He was replaced as head scout by Stu MacGregor in 2007 and made Assistant GM until he was fired from that job in 2010. Prendergast joined the Oilers organization since 1990. He served as the Oilers’ representative on the American Hockey League’s board of governors and served as the Director of Player Personnel for both the Springfield Falcons (AHL) and Stockton Thunder (ECHL). Prendergast joined the Oilers following seven seasons working with the NHL Central Scouting Bureau as the Assistant Director of Scouting. From 1983-84 to 1989-90 he was responsible for all scouting assignments and scheduling while also scouting the three major junior hockey leagues. In 1985-86 he also worked with the Canadian National Team in preparation
    6.00
    5 votes
    61

    John M. Gaver, Sr.

    John Milton Gaver, Sr. (October 29, 1900 - July 11, 1982) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born in Mt. Airy, Maryland, John Gaver graduated from Princeton University then worked as a prep school language teacher before eventually embarking on a career in Thoroughbred racing. In 1929, James G. Rowe, Jr., a friend and horse trainer, invited him to join the team managing the Brookdale Farm and racing stable owned by Harry Payne Whitney. After Harry Payne Whitney died in 1930, James Rowe, Jr. took over the running of the Mrs. Payne Whitney family's Greentree Stable and asked John Gaver to come with him. In 1939, Gaver was appointed head trainer for Greentree Stable, a position he would hold for the next thirty-eight years. During his time with Greentree, John Gaver conditioned seventy-three stakes-winning horses, including winners of five American Classic Races. Four of his horses earned Champions honors with Capot and Tom Fool voted Horse of the Year in 1946 and 1953 respectively. In 1966 John Gaver was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. In 1977 he suffered a stroke and his son John Jr. took over as trainer for the Greentree
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Luca Cumani

    Luca M. Cumani (born 7 April 1949 in Milan, Italy) is an Italian thoroughbred horse trainer. He has trained at Bedford House Stables in Newmarket, England since 1976. He has trained a multitude of high-profile horses, including seven Classic race winners, two Epsom Derby winners in Kahyasi (1988) and High-Rise (1998), as well as a Breeders' Cup Mile winner in Barathea (1994). As the son of champion amateur jockey Elena and champion trainer Sergio Cumani, horseracing has always been in his blood. He followed in their footsteps, emulating first his mother and then his father. Realizing that Newmarket is the center of the racing world, Luca moved to England in his early twenties to work for ten-time champion trainer Henry Cecil. It was not long before he started up his own training establishment at Bedford House and he has not looked back ever since. Within ten years he had 12 Group 1 winners in five different countries and the tally has now risen to 55 up until the present day. Not content with claiming the majority of the big domestic races, he has ventured far and wide with globetrotting champions such as Falbrav and Alkaased to win Group 1 races in Hong Kong and Japan,
    6.75
    4 votes
    63

    Wayne M. Catalano

    Wayne M. Catalano (July 24, 1956 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a former jockey and current trainer in American Thoroughbred horse racing who has won three Breeders' Cup World Championship races and trained two Eclipse Award Champions. Wayne Catalano began riding in 1974, learning the business under U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer Jack Van Berg. In 1977 Catalano won 349 races, finishing second to Steve Cauthen in the national standings. Knee injuries ended his riding career in mid April 1983 after having won 1,792 races. Catalano immediately turned to training after his riding career ended. Working from a base in Chicago, he won his first training title in 1987 at Hawthorne Race Course and earned another in 1989 and again in 2004. He won back-to-back training titles in 1988-1989 at Sportsman's Park Racetrack and between 2000 and 2010 won nine training titles at Arlington Park. In 2006, Wayne Catalano won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies with Dreaming of Anna and a second time in 2008 with She Be Wild. Both were voted American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly honors. In 2011, Catalano won his third Breeders Cup event, capturing the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf with Stephanie's
    6.75
    4 votes
    64

    James G. Rowe, Jr.

    James Gordon "Jimmy" Rowe, Jr. (c.1889 - October 21, 1931) was an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. The son of U.S. Hall of Fame trainer James G. Rowe, Sr., he initially planned to become a mechanical engineer and graduated from Fordham and Cornell universities. However, in 1913 he went to work for his father as an assistant and by the mid 1920s had several Greentree Stable horses under his exclusive conditioning. In 1929, he took over from his father as head trainer for Harry Payne Whitney's Brookdale Farm. After Whitney died, James Rowe, Jr. went to work for Helen Hay Whitney's Greentree Stable in the latter part of 1930, replacing Thomas W. Murphy. James Rowe, Jr. won all three of the U.S. Triple Crown races. He trained the 1928 Preakness Stakes winner Victorian, and in 1929 was the Leading trainer in the United States by earnings with $314,881 in purse money. Rowe, Jr.'s most famous horse was the Hall of Fame inductee Twenty Grand with which he won the other two Triple Crown races in 1931 and earned American Horse of the Year honors. Twenty Grand won the Kentucky Derby, was second in the Preakness which was run before the Derby that year, and won the Belmont Stakes. Rowe,
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Jim Day

    James E. "Jim" Day (born July 2, 1946 in Thornhill, Ontario) is a Canadian Olympic equestrian show jumping champion and thoroughbred horse trainer. Day first joined the Canadian International Team in 1964, and in 1966 tied the record high jump of 7 feet 1 inch at the National Horse Show in New York. Day took gold in individual jumping at the 1967 Pan American Games. Day was named Canada's Horseman of the Year three years running in 1966 through 1968. In 1968, he was a member of Canada's gold-medal equestrian team at the Summer Olympics in Mexico City. At 22 years of age, Day was the youngest member of the show jumping team. In the 1972 Olympics in Munich he finished 4th individually, and a team 6th. In the 1976 Summer Olympics he competed in both the show jumping and three day eventing competitions, coming in 15th individually and 5th team in the show jumping, and not finishing the three day eventing competition, although the Canadian team came in 6th. In 1971, Day took a job training race horses for Ernie Samuel, who had recently founded Sam-Son Farm. Day assisted in building the operation into a top Thoroughbred racing and breeding facility over the next 25 years. His training
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    John J. Tammaro, Jr.

    John J. Tammaro, Jr. (September 22, 1925 - February 25, 2001) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born in Baltimore, Maryland into a horse racing family, John Tammaro was still a young boy when his father died from injuries suffered in a racing accident at Belmont Park. His grandfather trained horses in Maryland, and as a teenager John Tammaro embarked on a career as a jockey. Between 1942 and 1956, he rode more than 1,000 winners at tracks in Maryland, West Virginia, and New Jersey but constant weight problems eventually forced him to give up riding and turn to training. John Tammaro along with King T. Leatherbury, Richard E. Dutrow, Sr. and Hall of Fame inductee Bud Delp became known as Maryland racing's "Big Four". They dominated racing in that state during the 1960s and '70s and helped modernize flat racing training. Tammaro also became one of the leading trainers at tracks elsewhere in the United States and Canada including Pimlico Race Course, Delaware Park, Monmouth Park, Calder Race Course, Gulfstream Park and Woodbine Racetrack. In 1976 John Tammaro became the head trainer for Kinghaven Farms in King City, Ontario. He trained five Canadian Champions for
    9.00
    2 votes
    67

    Moody Jolley

    Moody Jolley (March 23, 1910 - February, 1976) was an American thoroughbred horse racing owner, breeder and trainer. He began his professional training career in the mid 1930s and by 1940 had his first Kentucky Derby runner. For several years, he trained for Harry Guggenheim's Cain Hoy Stable. After their partnership ended in November 1952. Jolley would soon join Bull Hancock's renowned Claiborne Farm where he conditioned the great Round Table before the colt was sold. Six horses trained by Moody Jolley ran in the American Classics with his best result a sixth in the 1951 Kentucky Derby, a third in the 1959 Preakness Stakes and a third in the 1951 Belmont Stakes. The most famous horse Moody Jolley and his wife owned was Ridan, a strong-headed colt purchased as a yearling and owned in partnership with Ernest Woods and John L. Greer. In 1962 Ridan won the Florida Derby and Blue Grass Stakes and equaled the world record for five furlongs in a near effortless early-morning workout. The Jolleys also owned multiple Graded stakes race winner Nearly On Time whose wins included the 1976 Whitney Handicap. Moody Jolley was living in Hialeah, Florida at the time of his death in 1976. His son,
    9.00
    2 votes
    68

    Richard Mandella

    Richard Eugene Mandella (born November 5, 1950 in Altadena, California) is a Thoroughbred horse trainer and a member of the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame. Mandella's father, a blacksmith, introduced him to horses at an early age and while still in high school he began starting and training horses at a nearby ranch. He spent a year in New York as assistant to Lefty Nickerson and then took a job with Texas horseman Roger Braugh in 1974. Two years later, Richard Mandella returned to California and opened his own stable. His wins began almost immediately with Bad 'n Big and continued with Phone Trick, Dare and Go, and Pleasantly Perfect. Between 1996 and 1998 Mandella won six straight million dollar races in Southern California with Dare and Go, Siphon, Gentlemen and Malek. Mandella has seen six of his horses run in the Kentucky Derby. Mandella was inducted in the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame in 2001 and in 2003 he had four winners in the Breeders' Cup: Pleasantly Perfect, Johar, Halfbridled, and Action This Day. In 2006 Mandella wrote the introduction to Santa Anita Morning Rhapsody, by photographer-author Karen S. Davis, a book documenting morning thoroughbred racetrack training. "Most people
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    Sheila Laxon

    Sheila Laxon (born in Pontypridd, Glamorgan, Wales) was the first female thoroughbred horse trainer to win the Australian cups double, the Caulfield Cup and Melbourne Cup, with her mare Ethereal in 2001. Her efforts were recognised when she took out the Fred Hoysted Award for the Australian season's outstanding training performance. Sheila was born in Pontypriddand her early childhood was spent on a small farm in Wales, run by her mother. Her father was away from home much of the time working as a ship's pilot. It was on the farm that Sheila developed a passion for horses through pony clubs, gymkana's and showjumping. Before emigrating to New Zealand around 1980, she spent time working with English trainer John L. Dunlop at his stables in Arundel, Sussex. In New Zealand in 1983 she married trainer Laurie Laxon who had a large stable with many successful horses. She rode many of them in trackwork, including Empire Rose who won the 1988 Melbourne Cup. She took out her own training license in 1990. Sheila is still currently training in a partnership with John Symons at Whiteheads Creek in country Victoria.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    David E. Ferraris

    David E. Ferraris (born August 18, 1963 in South Africa) is now a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer in Hong Kong. Born into a racing family, his father, Ormond Ferraris, was a champion trainer in South African racing. David Ferraris embarked on his own training career in 1995 and went on to win the South African trainer's title four times. Among his notable wins were the 1997 Durban July handicap with Super Quality.He followed this up in 1998 with Classic Flag.The Durban July is considered to be South Africa's premier race. Ferraris has won nearly every major race on the South African racing calendar. In 2003, Ferraris moved to train in Hong Kong where he met with continued success, notably with Vengeance of Rain, winner of several Group 1 races,including The Hong Kong Derby, The Audemars Piguet QEll Cup,The Cathay Pacific International Cup as well as the 2007 Dubai Sheema Classic at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in Dubai.Vengeance of Rain retired with total stake earnings in excess of HK$ 70 million.At the time of his retirement in 2008, Vengeance of Rain was one of the leading stakes earning racehorses in the world. In 2010/11, he trained 19 winners for an overall total of 251.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72

    Dick Hern

    William Richard "Dick" Hern, CVO, (20 January 1921 – 22 May 2002) was an English Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and winner of sixteen British Classic Races between 1962 and 1995, and was Champion Trainer on four occasions. Following his early career in the Army (Major), he became a riding instructor, including a spell as instructor to the Olympic gold medal winning team in 1952. His first training license was as private trainer to Major Lionel Holliday at La Grange Stables in Newmarket, before moving to West Ilsley three years later. Hern became a St. Leger Stakes specialist, winning the event six times. He produced three Epsom Derby winners in Troy (1979), Henbit (1980) and Nashwan (1989), who also won the 2,000 Guineas and the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes. Hern trained Brigadier Gerard who was only beaten once in eighteen races. Other major winners include Sun Princess, Dayjur, Hethersett, Bireme, Bustino, Longboat, Little Wolf, Petoski, Highclere, Provoke, Prince of Dance, Minster Son, Unfuwain, Dunfermline and Cut Above. In December 1984 Hern was seriously injured in a hunting accident, after which time he used a wheelchair. In 1988 he was controversially sacked
    7.67
    3 votes
    73

    Earl Sande

    Earl H. Sande (November 13, 1898 – August 19, 1968) was an American Hall of Fame jockey and thoroughbred horse trainer. Born in Groton, South Dakota, Earl Sande started out as a bronco buster in the early 1900s but then became a successful American quarter horse rider before switching to thoroughbred horse racing in 1918. Sande joined Cal Shilling and Johnny Loftus as a contract rider for Commander J. K. L. Ross. In 1919, he tied an American record with six wins on a single racecard at Havre de Grace Racetrack. He went on to ride for noted owners such as Harry F. Sinclair, and Samuel D. Riddle and was the leading money-winning jockey in the United States in 1921, 1923, and again in 1927. He won both the Belmont Stakes five times and the Jockey Club Gold Cup on four occasions, the Kentucky Derby three times and the Preakness Stakes once. In 1923 he won 39 stakes races for Harry F. Sinclair's Rancocas Stable, ten of which were on ultimate Horse of the Year winner Zev, including the Kentucky Derby, Belmont Stakes, and a match race against England's Epsom Derby winner Papyrus. Sande's most famous wins came aboard Gallant Fox in 1930 when he won the U.S. Triple Crown. Sande's fame was
    7.67
    3 votes
    74

    François Doumen

    François Doumen (born June 11, 1940) is a French racehorse trainer currently based at Boucé, Orne. From 1956 to 1970 he was an amateur jockey, and he then worked as an assistant trainer to his father Jean. He obtained his own training licence in 1977. Doumen was initially based at Maisons-Laffitte, and he subsequently moved to Lamorlaye and later Chantilly. Doumen has been successful in both flat and jump racing, and his most notable horses have included The Fellow, Jim and Tonic and Baracouda. His son, Thierry, is also a trainer and a former jockey. France Canada Great Britain Hong Kong Ireland United Arab Emirates
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    7.67
    3 votes
    76

    Ronald W. Ellis

    Ronald W. Ellis (born March 10, 1960, in Glendale, California) is an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer. A November 8, 1997 Los Angeles Times article noted that he "is known for taking his time with horses and taking special care with those prone to injury." Ron Ellis only saw his first live Thoroughbred horse race at age sixteen but was immediately "hooked" on the sport. Four years later he was training horses and earned his first win with To B. Or Not who won the 1980 Carlsbad Stakes at Del Mar Racetrack and then captured that year's Palos Verdes Handicap plus back-to-back wins in the 1981-1982 El Conejo Handicap. A difficult horse to handle, To B. Or Not set two track records in three years of racing for Ellis who went on to train for prominent owners such as Pam and Martin Wygod, B. Wayne Hughes, and the Mace Siegel family's Jay Em Ess Stable. In 2004, Ellis trained Declan's Moon to an undefeated season and American Champion Two-Year-Old Colt honors. In 2009, he won the most important race of his career when Rail Trip captured the Grade I Hollywood Gold Cup. Ron Ellis serves on the Board of Directors of the Thoroughbred Owners of California (TOC). He and wife Amy, with
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    Laz Barrera

    Lazaro Sosa Barrera (May 8, 1924 – April 25, 1991) was a Cuban-born American Hall of Fame thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born in Havana, "Laz" Barrera was one of nine brothers who went on to become involved in thoroughbred horse racing in the United States. While in his teens, he began working at a racetrack in his native Cuba and within a few years was one of the country's most respected young trainers. Seeking increased opportunities in a larger market, in the 1940s Barrera moved to Mexico to race horses at the Hipodromo de las Americas in Mexico City. There, he met California-based trainer Hal King, who encouraged him to come to the United States. Barrera did, and in 1971 trained his first American Stakes race winner. In the ensuing years he built a solid reputation and in late 1975 was given Bold Forbes to train who had been that year's Puerto Rican two-year-old thoroughbred sprint champion. Racing in the U.S. in 1976 under jockey Angel Cordero, Jr., Bold Forbes won several important races for Barrera including the Wood Memorial Stakes in record time. He went on to win the most prestigious race of all, the Kentucky Derby, finished third in the Preakness Stakes and, for a
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Rick Dutrow

    Richard E. "Rick" Dutrow, Jr. (born August 5, 1959 in Hagerstown, Maryland) is an American thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Known as Rick, his brother Anthony Dutrow is also a trainer. Their father, Richard E. Dutrow, Sr., was one of Maryland racing's "Big Four" who dominated racing in that state during the 1960s and '70s and who helped modernize flat racing training. At age sixteen, Rick, Jr. began working as his father's assistant. In 1995, he set up his own public stable in New York after his father left the NYRA circuit to return to Maryland. He got his big break in 2005 when he won two Breeders' Cup races with Silver Train and Saint Liam. His 1,000th lifetime victory was with Kip Deville in the Frank E. Kilroe Mile on March 3, 2007. In 2008, he trained Big Brown to Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes victories, although the colt failed to capture the Triple Crown with a last place finish in the 140th Belmont Stakes. At the time, Dutrow had suspended or fined 72 times by US horse-racing authorities and had admitted to regularly administering the steroid Winstrol to his horses including Big Brown. Dutrow, Jr. was a finalist for the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer for 2008.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Sam Hildreth

    Samuel Clay Hildreth (May 16, 1866 – September 24, 1929) was an American Thoroughbred horse racing Hall of Fame trainer and owner. Born in Independence, Missouri, Sam Hildreth began his training career in 1887, competing at racetracks in the Midwestern United States with such horses as the good racemare Hurley Burley, the dam of Burgomaster. In 1898 he moved to New York City where thoroughbred racing was a leading sport offering the largest purses. He was first hired to train horses owned by wealthy businessman William Collins Whitney, but soon set out on his own, buying horses for himself and training for others. He won his first of seven Belmont Stakes in 1899 with the horse Jean Bereaud for owner Sydney Paget. By the turn of the 20th century, Samuel Hildreth had expanded his New York operations and owned the largest racing stables at the Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans. That year, he appointed former outlaw Frank James as his betting commissioner at the track. Among the horses Hildreth owned was Fitz Herbert (b.1906) who won the Brooklyn Handicap, Suburban Handicap, and the Jerome Handicap en route to being voted the Horse of the Year in 1909, and again in 1910. Another
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Todd Pletcher

    Todd Pletcher

    Todd Pletcher (born June 26, 1967, Dallas, Texas) is a leading American thoroughbred horse trainer. He has won four consecutive Eclipse Awards as outstanding Trainer of the Year, while topping the leader board in purse earnings in 2004, 2005, and 2006. His horse Super Saver won the 2010 Kentucky Derby, the first of his 24 horses entered in his career to win the Run for the Roses. He also won the 2007 Belmont Stakes with filly Rags to Riches. Todd began working for his father, Jake Pletcher, as a hot walker at the age of seven. During his summers off from junior and senior high school he went to California where he worked as a hot walker for Henry Moreno at Hollywood Park and Del Mar Racetracks. He graduated from James Madison High School in San Antonio, TX in 1985 and began college at the University of Arizona in their Race Track Industry Program in the fall of that year. Between his sophomore and junior years he worked as a groom for D. Wayne Lukas at Arlington Park near Chicago. He spent the following summer with another legendary Hall of Fame trainer, Charlie Whittingham, working as a groom at Hollywood Park. While attending University of Arizona, Pletcher was an active member
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Colin Little

    Colin Little

    Colin Little (born 4 November 1972 in Wythenshawe, Manchester) is an English footballer currently playing for Witton Albion. He plays as a Striker. Little began his career in non-League football with Rossendale United before signing for Hyde United. After being spotted by Crewe Alexandra manager Dario Gradi he signed for them for £50,000 in the summer of 1996. After initial success at Crewe he became a journeyman around the Football League, playing for Macclesfield Town and Halifax Town before being released in 2004. Shortly after this Little signed for Altrincham. He was the club top scorer at Altrincham for the next four seasons. He scored his 100th goal for the club in the 1–0 victory away to Newcastle Blue Star in the FA Cup fourth qualifying round on 26 October 2008. On 7 April 2010, it was announced that Little would leave Altrincham at the end of the 2009–10 season, in order to become assistant coach for Manchester United under-13s. He joined F.C. United of Manchester as a player in the summer of 2010 and was named in the 21 player squad for the 2010–11 season by the club. He then scored 2 goals in his league debut on 8 August 2010 for the club after coming on as a
    6.50
    4 votes
    82

    David A. Whiteley

    David A. Whiteley (born c. 1944) is a retired American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer who trained three Champions and who in 1979 won the third leg of the U.S. Triple Crown. The son of U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee, Frank Y. Whiteley, Jr., he grew up in the industry. David Whiteley's win with Coastal in the 1979 Belmont Stakes ended the Triple Crown hopes of Spectacular Bid. His three Champions were all female horses: Whiteley retired in November 1995.
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    6.50
    4 votes
    84

    Jay Robbins

    Jay M. Robbins (born December 2, 1945, in Pasadena, California) is an American trainer in thoroughbred horse racing based in California. He is the son of veterinarian Dr. Jack Robbins, President and founding Director of Oak Tree Racing Association. Jay Robbins trained Tiznow, who won the Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year in 2000 and who is the only horse to win two Breeders' Cup Classic.
    6.50
    4 votes
    85

    John P. Campo

    John P. Campo, Sr. (February 24, 1938 - November 13, 2005) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Campo was born in East Harlem, New York and raised in Ozone Park, Queens. He is best known as the trainer of 1981 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner, Pleasant Colony. Among his other notable horses, John Campo conditioned both of 1973's 2-year-old Eclipse Award winners, the Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Talking Picture, the exceptional Jim French, and Champion 2-Year-Old Colt, Protagonist. In January 1986, Campo suffered a devastating loss when thirty-six of his horses died when a fire swept through his racetrack barn at Belmont Park. After suffering a stroke, John Campo retired in 1996. During his thirty years training horses he saddled 1,431 winners from 12,826 starters. He was living in Hewlett, New York on Long Island when he died in 2005. He is buried at Pinelawn Memorial Park in Melville, Long Island. His son, Paul J. Campo, is the racing secretary for the New York Racing Association.
    6.50
    4 votes
    86

    Bart Cummings

    James Bartholomew 'Bart' Cummings, AM (born 14 November 1927) is one of the most successful Australian racehorse trainers. He is known as the Cups King, referring to the Melbourne Cup, as the he has won the 'race that stops a nation' a record 12 times. Cummings was born in 1927, the son of the accomplished trainer Jim Cummings, who trained the great stayer Comic Court to a win in the 1950 Melbourne Cup. He started his career working for his father as a strapper, despite being allergic to horses and hay. Cummings received his trainer licence in 1953, and set up stables at Glenelg in South Australia. His first significant win came in 1958, when he won the South Australian Derby, the same year he bought his first yearling. Cummings had a record total of 78 runners in the Melbourne Cup at the time of writing. Starting in 1958 with Asian Court who finished 12th behind Baystone. His next entrant was Trellios who fronted up in 1959 and finished 5th behind MacDougal. In 1960, Sometime finished in 6th place. It wasn't until 1965 that he hit the big time. With 3 runners in the Melbourne Cup, he finished first with Light Fingers, second with Ziema, and his other runner, The Dip finished
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Burley Parke

    Burley Parke

    Burley Parke: b. 3/21/1905 – d. 10/4/1977: Thoroughbred Racehorse Hall of Fame Trainer inductee 1987 Burley Parke was born in Albion, Idaho, one of 12 children (8 boys and 4 girls) of parents Anson and Julia Harris Parke. Anson was a stockman and rancher who moved from Utah to Albion, Idaho and later to the small nearby town of Declo. Anson raised many animals including sheep and horses. Each year, when the county fair opened, Anson often took some of his horses to the races. Although he would ride, as his sons became old enough and had sufficient skills, they took their turns at riding the horses. Many races were won and the boys small size and experience soon caught the attention of those who raced in the big horse racing circuits of Nevada and California. Burley and 4 of his brothers found careers in Thoroughbred Racing, all of them starting off as jockeys. Vosco was the first to leave home then Burley. He raced in Reno, Nevada and then on to California’s Santa Anita and Tiajuana tracks. He was successful and was second leading rider in the country in 1921, but after a couple of seasons, he became to big to ride. So he tried his hand as a jockey’s agent and then went on to assistant training. His brothers, Ivan, Chuck and Monte came along behind him and became successful in their own right. Ivan was the nation’s leading jockey in 1923 and 1924. He won the first race ever run at Hialeah Park in Florida. Monte was the nation’s second leading rider in 1933. Burley channeled his natural skills and knowledge of horses to training. From 1942-1944, training for John Marsh, a retired railroad contractor and one of America’s richest men at the time, he won 9 Futurities. The experts found this to be an amazing feat. Within racing and media circles, Burley was respectfully called “The Futurity Man”. Two of his favorite horses were full brothers Occupation and Occupy (by Bull Dog out of Miss Bunting) who both had won the Washington Futurity one year after the other. Charles Howard, who owned Seabiscuit, hired Burley to run his racing stable in the late 1940’s. It was then that Howard bought the Hall of Fame horse Noor from the Aga Kahn and brought him to America. Parke saw a horse with great promise but one that was stubborn and ill tempered. Having raced in Europe, the American tracks and style of racing was unfamiliar to Noor. Parke used his skill and patience to slowly convince Noor to use his speed to become one of the great racehorses of American racing beating the great Citation 4 times. This was the highlight of Parke’s career. Noor was retired after winning the Hollywood Gold Cup in December 1950. Burley also retired and turned his attention to his 55 acre fruit ranch in Santa Rosa, California. He remained there until in 1959, at the recommendation of Ivan Parke, Louis Wolfson, a relative new comer to thoroughbred racing convinced Burley to return to training. Wolfson put Parke charge of his Harborview Farm stable which would stable at Belmont, Saratoga and Hialeah with strings also racing in Chicago and New Orleans. With Harborview Farm stable, Parke trained many notable horses including Raise a Native, one of the premier stallions of thoroughbred breeding, and Roman Brother, who was named American Champion Older Male Horse and co-Horse of the year in 1965. Burley was a soft spoken man who was reserved and polite. He always spoke with high regards and respect for the men he worked for. In private circles he had a great sense of humor and loved practical jokes. He was well respected not only by his peers and racing fans but also by his family. Burley married Marion L. Eddy and had a daughter, Virginia M. Parke. He later divorced and married Dorothy Anderson Bosley, a single mother of 5 children whom he met on a visit home to Declo, Idaho. He took on this young family and served as a respected stepfather and with Dorothy, fathered 4 more of his own children; Marlyce, Marvin, Gary and Eldon. He was a good father who spent considerable time with his children. Burley Parke ranked among America's top five trainers on seven occasions. With a great contribution to and success in American thoroughbred racing, Parke retired in 1967 and moved with his family to Phoenix, Arizona. He spent the summer months with his family in his beloved Idaho. His passion was the outdoors. If he wasn’t fishing he was camping beside a stream or gardening in flower beds or vegetable gardens. He died of a heart attack in Burley, Idaho October 4, 1977 and is buried in Albion, Idaho.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Frank Y. Whiteley, Jr.

    Frank Yewell Whiteley, Jr. (January 31, 1915 – May 2, 2008) was a Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born and raised on a farm in Centreville, Maryland, Whiteley grew up around horses and from a very early age was intent on racing them. Developing his skills, by age twenty-one he had embarked on a professional training career in his home state. He would retire forty-nine years later having trained some of the most famous American racehorses of the second half of the 20th century. Whiteley's first Champion was Tom Rolfe, who gave him his first win Classic winner in 1965 when Ron Turcotte rode him to victory in the Preakness Stakes. In 1967, Whitelely had his second Champion in Damascus who won two more Classics for him and was voted the 1967 Horse of the Year. Long reticent about talking to the media, leading up to the 1967 Kentucky Derby Whiteley finally gave in as a result of all the hoopla surrounding Damascus. According to a New York Post newspaper article, "the first question was “How did Damascus sleep last night?” To which Whiteley replied, “How the hell would I know? I didn’t sleep with him.” Then he turned and walked back into the barn." For the 1974 racing
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Fred Darling

    Frederick Darling (1884–1953) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse trainer who trained a record-equalling seven English Derby winners. Fred’s father, Sam Darling senior, was a trainer at Beckhampton, Wiltshire who trained two Derby winners himself. Fred initially started training National Hunt racehorses for Lady de Bathe (Lillie Langtry) at Kentford near Newmarket, and then went to train in Germany. He returned to Britain in 1913 to take over the Beckhampton stables when his father retired. He continued to train there until his retirement in 1947. He was succeeded as trainer at Beckhampton by Noel Murless. Amongst his most successful horses were Hurry On, the unbeaten St. Leger winner of 1916; Sun Chariot who won three British Classic Races in 1942; and Tudor Minstrel, the 2,000 Guineas winner of 1947. From 1932 until his retirement Darling's stable jockey was Gordon Richards. He is commemorated by the Fred Darling Stakes, run at Newbury Racecourse. Fred Darling was Champion Trainer six times - in 1926, 1933, 1940, 1941, 1942 and 1947. As well as a trainer, he was also a breeder of thoroughbreds and bred Pinza, who won the Derby in 1953. He trained the winners of 19 English
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    John T. Ward, Jr.

    John T. Ward, Jr. (born August 2, 1945 in Lexington, Kentucky) is an American racehorse trainer. He is a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a degree in Agricultural Economics, where he was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He is a third generation horseman on both sides of his family. He took charge of the family farm at age twenty-five when his father became ill in 1970. Ward met his wife, Donna, when he was showing horses. They now operate John T. Ward Stables and Sugar Grove Farm in Central Kentucky. NYRA Biography
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Marcus Marsh

    Marcus Maskell Marsh (1904–1983) was an English racehorse trainer. He was the son of the trainer Richard Marsh. His British Classic wins included the Epsom Derby and St. Leger with Tulyar (1952) and Windsor Lad (1934) as well as the 2,000 Guineas with Palestine (1950). He was British flat racing Champion Trainer in 1952. Marsh's career spanned over forty years until his retirement in 1964 with a break during World War II when he served in the RAF. In 1968 Marsh published his autobiography, Racing with the Gods.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92

    Patrick Biancone

    Patrick Louis Biancone (born June 7, 1952 in Mont-de-Marsan, Landes, France) is a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He is currently based in the United States, but enjoyed success in both Europe and Hong Kong earlier in his career. He was the head trainer for the Daniel Wildenstein stable in France, where his horses won numerous important races including back-to-back victories (with All Along and Sagace) in the 1983 and 1984 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. After leaving his native France, for most of the 1990s Biancone trained in Hong Kong but in 1999 was suspended after two of his horses tested positive for banned medications. Biancone trained Triptych, who won the 1987 Irish Champion Stakes and the 1988 Coronation Cup. However, his most famous horse is the '83 Arc winner All Along, a filly who also raced in North America and was voted both French and U.S. Horse of the Year honors and was inducted into the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame. Among his efforts in the United States, Patrick Biancone trained Lion Heart, who finished second in the 2004 Kentucky Derby. In 2005, he trained Angara to win the Beverly D stakes. The following year, Biancone's Gorella took the Beverly D. On June 22, 2007,
    7.33
    3 votes
    93

    Dallas Stewart

    Dallas Stewart (born September 15, 1959 in McComb, Mississippi) trains a string of thoroughbred horses in Kentucky from bases at Churchill Downs, Turfway Park, Keeneland Race Course, Fair Grounds Race Course, Arlington Park and Saratoga Race Course. Before venturing out on his own, he spent 12 years working under the tutelage of leading trainer D. Wayne Lukas. There, he oversaw such horses as Lady's Secret, Thunder Gulch, Serena's Song, Timber Country, Tabasco Cat, and many other Grade I winners. In 1999, Stewart trained Kimberlite Pipe to win the Grade II Louisiana Derby and Sapphire and Silk to win the Grade III Prioress Stakes at Belmont Park. Stewart won his first training title at the 2000 Keeneland Race Course Spring Meet. His stakes performers during 2000 included Dollar Bill, who won the Grade II Brown & Williamson Kentucky Jockey Club Stakes at Churchill and competed in all three legs of the Triple Crown. In 2001, his stabled earned more than $3.8 million, topped by Unbridled Elaine's payday for winning the Grade I Breeders' Cup Distaff. He also won two graded events with Nasty Storm—the Grade II Churchill Downs Distaff Handicap and Grade III Dogwood Stakes. In 2002,
    6.25
    4 votes
    94

    Nick Zito

    Nicholas Philip "Nick" Zito (born February 6, 1948 in New York City, New York) is an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. Zito began his career as a hot walker and worked his way up to a groom, to an assistant trainer, and to a trainer. His first top level horse was Thirty Six Red with which he won the 1990 Grade 1 Wood Memorial Stakes and earned a second place finish in that year's Belmont Stakes. Nick Zito went on to win the Preakness once, and the Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes twice. He got his big break in 1991 when he won his first Kentucky Derby on Strike the Gold. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 2005, a year that his stable won more than $8 million in purses. Zito has also trained the 1996 U.S. Champion2-Year-Old Filly Storm Song as well as Bird Town who was voted the 2003 U.S. Champion 3-Year-Old Filly. Nick Zito is a National Spokesperson and Honorary Director of the National Horse Protection Coalition. Zito and his wife, Kim, work tirelessly for the just treatment of horses and contribute much time and money to the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation. Other Graded stakes race wins (partial list):
    6.25
    4 votes
    95

    Bruce Headley

    Bruce Headley (born 14 February 1934, in Baldwin Park, California) is a Thoroughbred horse trainer and owner. Involved with horse racing since his teens, Headley worked as an exercise rider from 1949 until taking out his trainers license in 1959. Based in California, he first gained national attention with Bertrando who won the 1991 Norfolk Stakes by a record nine lengths and went on to a second-place finish behind a brilliant performance by European star, Arazi. Headley's greatest success to date came with the Champion sprint horse Kona Gold, a winner of multiple stakes races including the 2000 Breeders' Cup Sprint. In addition to being the horse's trainer, Headley is also a one-third partner. In 2003, Bruce Headley trained Got Koko, owned by his wife Aase in partnership with Paul Leung. The filly became just the third-ever winner of the La Cañada Series at Santa Anita Park since its inception in 1975. The three-race series consists of the La Brea, El Encino and La Cañada Stakes for newly turning/turned 4-year old fillies run at an increasing distance.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96

    Henry Cecil

    Sir Henry Richard Amherst Cecil (born 11 January 1943) is a successful English flat racing trainer, widely regarded as one of the greatest trainers to have ever graced the Turf. He has been Champion Trainer 10 times and, as of June 2012, has trained 25 domestic Classic winners, comprising four winners of the Epsom Derby, eight winners of the Epsom Oaks, six winners of the 1,000 Guineas, three of the 2,000 Guineas and four winners of the St. Leger Stakes. His success in the Epsom Oaks and the 1,000 Guineas has made him particularly renowned for his success with fillies. He is the Master trainer at Royal Ascot, where he has saddled more than 70 winners. Among the jockeys to have ridden for Cecil, the most notable have been Steve Cauthen, Lester Piggott, Joe Mercer, Kieren Fallon, Pat Eddery and Tom Queally. Describing his approach to training, Cecil himself said: "I do everything by instinct really, not by the book. I like to think I’ve got a feeling for and understand my horses, that they tell me what to do really." Cecil was knighted for services to horse racing in the Queen's 2011 Birthday Honours. Cecil was born on 11 January 1943 in a hospital near Aberdeen, ten minutes ahead of
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    James A. Jerkins

    James A. "Jimmy" Jerkens is an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. His father, U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee H. Allen Jerkens, and brother, Steve Jerkens, are also trainers. He won the Breeders' Cup Mile in 2005 with Artie Schiller and the 2007 Breeders' Cup Dirt Mile with Corinthian. In 2009, Jerkens won the Fountain of Youth Stakes and the Florida Derby with Quality Road, making the colt one of the favorites for the Kentucky Derby.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Michael Matz

    Michael Matz

    Michael Ray Matz (born January 23, 1951 in Collegeville, Pennsylvania) was an American Olympic equestrian team member inducted into the show jumping Hall of Fame and is now a race horse trainer. He lives in Coatesville, Pennsylvania. As a trainer, he has scored two wins in the Classics, the 2012 Belmont Stakes (Union Rags) and the 2006 Kentucky Derby (Barbaro). Matz also was named "person of the week" by ABC News for his heroism in saving four children from the crash of United Airlines flight 232 in 1989 Matz had a highly successful equestrian career as a show jumping rider. He was a six-time U.S. national champion, and won at least one major show jumping event in 20 consecutive years. Matz won team gold at the 1986 World Championships in Aachen riding Chef, to go with his individual and team bronze medals he won at the 1978 World Equestrian Championships while riding Jet Run. He also so won the 1981 Show Jumping World Cup on Jet Run. Matz has won a total of four gold medals and four bronze medals at the Pan American Games, and was a member of the U.S. Olympic equestrian teams in 1976, 1992, and 1996. In 1996, he won a team silver medal on Rhum IV, in the show jumping equestrian
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    Robert W. Walden

    Robert Wyndham Walden ( 1843 - April 28, 1905) was one of the most successful trainers in thoroughbred horse racing during the last quarter of the 19th century. Known by his middle name, Wyndham, in 1872 Walden and his wife Caroline moved from New York to Middleburg in Carroll County, Maryland where they established "Bowling Brook Farm" to breed and train thoroughbred race horses. Wyndham Walden trained his first Preakness Stakes winner in 1875, Tom Ochiltree, then two years later began a streak of five straight victories, all of which came with horses owned by George L. Lorillard. Walden won the Preakness for a seventh time in 1888 with his own horse, Refund. The win set a record for a trainer which still stands. During a career spanning thirty-one years between 1872 and 1902, he also won the Belmont Stakes four times and trained more than 100 Stakes race winners. In 1899, his son Robert J. Walden won the Kentucky Derby with Manuel, owned by the Morris brothers, Alfred and David. His daughter married jockey Fred Littlefield who rode Refund to his 1888 Preakness Stakes victory and was aboard Bowling Brook for the win in the 1898 Belmont Stakes. On Wyndham Walden's death in 1905,
    7.00
    3 votes
    100

    Thad Ackel

    Thad Ackel (born May 24, 1955) is a retired American thoroughbred horse trainer. He was a California-based trainer and part-owner of Great Communicator, winner of the 1988 Breeders' Cup Turf and Hollywood Turf Cup Stakes as well as the 1989 Hollywood Turf Handicap. Ackel retired from training after his father, George Ackel, died in 1992. He returned to run his family's commercial real estate business in Louisiana where he then purchased a 30-acre (120,000 m) farm in Covington, Louisiana.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Tom Walls

    Tom Kirby Walls (18 February 1883 - 27 November 1949) was a popular English stage and films character actor, and film director. He has claim to be one of the most influential figures in British comedy. A native of Northampton, Walls was the son of a plumber. After leaving school, he spent a year in Canada and joined the police on his return. After these false starts, he settled on a stage career in 1905. Over the next few years he worked steadily, appearing in the West End as well as touring Britain, Australia and North America. By 1912 he was firmly established as a West End star. He had a principal role in the musical Kissing Time in 1919 and in Whirled into Happiness in 1922. Leslie Henson and Tom Walls co-produced the farce Tons of Money in 1922 at the Shaftesbury Theatre. This was a great popular success, and so they collaborated again, moving to the Aldwych Theatre and inaugurating the long-running Aldwych farce series of comedies. Walls produced, directed and starred in the series. The plays usually also featured Ralph Lynn, Robertson Hare, Yvonne Arnaud, Mary Brough and Winifred Shotter among others. The farces, written by Ben Travers, incorporated and developed of British
    6.00
    4 votes
    102

    Bob Holthus

    Robert E. "Bob" Holthus (June 24, 1934 – November 22, 2011) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. As a second generation trainer, Holthus learned the profession from his father, Paul Holthus. Holthus is the all-time winningest trainer at Oaklawn Park and as of 2005 had won nine trainer's titles there. He was also won training titles at Chicago's Arlington Park and Hawthorne Race Course, the Detroit Race Course, Ellis Park Racecourse in Henderson, Kentucky, Louisiana Downs in Bossier City, Louisiana plus a fall meeting at Turfway Park in the suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio. Bob Holthus was the trainer for the Kentucky Derby entrants Greater Good and Pro Prado but is best known nationally as the trainer of Pure Clan and Lawyer Ron from the start of his career in 2005 until October 2006. Bob Holthus and his widow Bonnie owned the Kilkerry Farm at Royal, Arkansas near Hot Springs at the time of his death.
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Daniel J. Vella

    Daniel J. "Dan" Vella (born November 18, 1955 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian Champion Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Dan Vella was introduced to Thoroughbred horse racing by an uncle who owned horses and, after graduating from High School, went to work at a racetrack in his native Toronto. After an apprenticehip he worked as an assistant trainer with Patrick Collins and got his first win in 1985. Following the death of Patrick Collins in 1990, Vella took over as head trainer for the prominent Woodbine-based Knob Hill Stable where he remained until joining the racing operations of Frank Stronach in late 1991. Training for Stronach Stables, between 1993 and 1998 Vella spent a good part of his time competing in the United States but won important races at Woodbine including Canada's most prestigious race in 1994, the Queen's Plate. That year, he was voted the Canadian Sovereign Award for Outstanding Trainer and repeated as Champion trainer in 1995. After parting ways with Stonach Stables he remained working in the United States then returned to a Toronto base in 2003.
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Edward D. Brown

    Edward D. Brown

    Edward Dudley Brown (1850 – May 11, 1906) was an African American born as a slave who rose to become a Belmont Stakes-winning jockey, a Kentucky Derby-winning horse trainer, and an owner of several of the top racehorses during the last decade of the 19th century, earning him induction into the United States Racing Hall of Fame. Born in Lexington, Kentucky, at age seven Ed Brown's owner sold him to Robert A. Alexander, proprietor of the famous Woodburn Stud near Midway, Kentucky. He worked as a groom and grew up developing a keen understanding of horse breeding and how to condition horses for racing. His small boyhood stature and knowledge of horses afforded him the opportunity to become a jockey. Following his emancipation after the Civil War, Brown remained as an employee of Robert Alexander and rode a number of his horses to victory in important races. Robert Alexander died in 1867, and two years later Woodburn Stud manager Daniel Swigert left to establish Stockwood Farm. Ed Brown accepted an offer to ride for Swigert's new stable and in 1870 he won the Belmont Stakes aboard Kingfisher. However, as he developed into a young man his weight gain hampered his ability to successfully
    8.00
    2 votes
    105

    Edward Dunlop

    Edward A. L. Dunlop (born 20 October 1968) is a British thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Ed Dunlop was born to British champion trainer John Dunlop and his wife. Educated at Eton, he began his career on stud farms in Ireland and Kentucky before completing the National Stud student course in Sydney, Australia. Upon returning to Britain he spent three years as assistant to Nicky Henderson, then joined Alex Scott at his Newmarket Stables. When Scott was murdered in 1994 Dunlop took over and renamed the business Gainsborough Stables. The new stable had its first winner on 19 October 1994 and since then has sent entrants to races as far-flung as Istanbul, Dubai, Milan, Ireland and the United States. In 2003 alone the stable had 50 winners, and such prestigious owners as Edward Stanley, 19th Earl of Derby, have placed horses to train with Dunlop. Notable horses include Ouija Board (won 47%, £2 million). Dunlop married in 1996 and has three daughters. Great Britain Canada France Hong Kong Ireland Italy Japan United States
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    George Lambton

    George Lambton (23 December 1860 - 23 July 1945) was a British thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He was British flat racing Champion Trainer in the 1906, 1911 and 1912 seasons. Lambton was the fifth son of George Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham. He was educated at Eton College and Cambridge University. He was married to Cicely Horner. Their younger son, Edward "Teddy" Lambton (1918–83), was also a racehorse trainer. As an amateur jockey he won the Grand Steeple-Chase de Paris on Parasang in 1888. After a fall at Sandown Park Racecourse in 1892 he decided to take up training and in 1893 he was appointed trainer to the 16th Earl of Derby at Bedford Lodge stables in Newmarket, Suffolk. He trained Canterbury Pilgrim to win the 1896 Epsom Oaks for Lord Derby and the 1906 Epsom Oaks with Keystone II. Lord Derby died in 1908 and was succeeded by his son, the 17th Earl of Derby. George Lambton trained the winners of ten British Classic Races for the Earl including the Epsom Derby with Sansovino in 1924 and Hyperion in 1933. He also trained the 1,000 Guineas winner Diadem for Lord d'Abernon in 1917. In 1926 Lambton was replaced by Frank Butters as Lord Derby's trainer but remained as his racing
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Julio Canani

    Julio C. Canani (born November 13, 1938 in Oxapampa, Peru) is a trainer in American Thoroughbred horse racing who has won three Breeders' Cup races. Canani emigrated to the United States in 1954 and settled in California where he began working for racehorse trainer Tommy Doyle. In 1968, he obtained his trainer's license and over the next few years earned a reputation for developing claiming horses into stakes race winners. In 1993, having won numerous major California races including the prestigious Santa Anita Handicap, Canani took a break from racing until the spring of 1997 when he returned to operate the Nick Canani Racing Stable at Hollywood Park Racetrack. He went on to win the 1999 and 2001 editions of the Breeders' Cup Mile and in 2004 the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Maurice Zilber

    Maurice Zilber (c. 1920 – December 21, 2008) was a thoroughbred horse trainer born and raised in Cairo, Egypt to a Turkish mother and a French-Hungarian father. He trained horses in Egypt from 1946 to 1962, and then moved to France where he worked for another 43 years. Based at the Chantilly Racecourse in France, Maurice Zilber conditioned horses for some of the leading owners such as Serge Fradkoff, Daniel Wildenstein, Nelson Bunker Hunt and in later years, Prince Khalid Abdullah. His horses competed across Europe and in 1976 he accomplished the rare feat of training the winner of both the English Derby and the French Derby. Maurice Zilber also regularly brought horses to North America to compete in major grass races such as the Canadian International Championship Stakes at Woodbine Racetrack in Canada and the Washington, D.C. International Stakes at Laurel Park Racecourse in the United States. Zilber won the Canadian International a record-tying three times and the Washington, D.C. International, on a record four occasions. An October 20, 1991 Washington Post article referred to him as "the illustrious French trainer whose work has become legend in Maryland." Maurice Zilber
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    Virgil W. Raines

    Virgil W. Raines (March 30, 1911 - May 10, 2000) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Known as "Buddy" Raines, in the 1930s he began working as a stable hand and became an exercise rider, notably for the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame colt Cavalcade. He went on to condition racehorses for 65 years, working primarily on the U.S. East Coast and was a regular at Delaware Park and Monmouth Park Racetracks. Buddy Raines met with his greatest success training horses for Donald Ross's Brandywine Stable. He had great success with Cochise, winning several important races between 1949 and 1951, including the Massachusetts and Arlington Handicaps and the Saratoga Cup and set or equaled track records at Suffolk Downs and Delaware Park. In July 1950, with the colt Greek Song, Raines won the Arlington Classic, a race that at the time was one of the most important in America. As a stallion, Greek Song was mated to the mare Lucy Lufton, a granddaughter of the great sire Nearco. Their union produced Greek Money who would give Buddy Raines his most important win in 1962 when the chestnut colt won a U.S. Triple Crown race, the Preakness Stakes. In 1966, Raines conditioned Open Fire to a champion
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Ansel Williamson

    Ansel Williamson was an African American thoroughbred horse racing trainer Ansel Williamson was born a slave in Virginia sometime around the middle part of the 19th century. In 1864 he was purchased by Robert A. Alexander, owner of the famous Woodburn Stud near Midway, Kentucky. Taught the breeding and training of horses, after he was freed Williamson remained in Alexander's employ. He conditioned a number of successful horses including the undefeated U.S. champion three-year-old male, Norfolk and the undefeated Asteroid. Following Robert Alexander's death in 1867, Williamsom went on to train many great horses including Tom Bowling, who won 14 of his 17 races, and Virgil who was the sire of the great Hindoo. However, he is best remembered for having trained Aristides, the winner of the inaugural Kentucky Derby in 1875. That same year, his horse Calvin won the Belmont Stakes. In addition, Williamson trained horses who won other major races such as the Travers Stakes, the Jerome Handicap, and the Withers Stakes. Following its formation, in 1998 Ansel Williamson was inducted posthumously into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Bernard Secly

    Bernard Secly (born 5 May 1931 in Paris, France) is a horse trainer in Thoroughbred flat racing and most notably in steeplechase racing. Secly won five Group One flat races but is best known for his conditioning two French Horse Racing Hall of Fame steeplechase horses, Katko and Al Capone II.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Gordon Elliott

    Gordon Elliott is a County Meath-based National Hunt racehorse trainer who was 29 when his first Grand National entry, the 33 to 1 outsider Silver Birch won the 2007 race on 14 April 2007. Owned by Brian Walsh of County Kildare, and ridden by Robbie Power, the horse held off McKelvey and Slim Pickings to win the Aintree Racecourse event. The 14th April 2007 saw Gordon Elliott become the youngest ever trainer to win the world's most prestigious steeplechase, the Aintree Grand National.The horse, Silver Birch, was bought from Paul Nicholls. Despite having won the Grand National, Gordon had not at that stage trained a winner on the track back home in Ireland. Elliott won another major handicap race in Britain in August 2010 when Dirar won the Ebor Handicap at York Racecourse. At the age of thirteen Gordon first entered the racing world, working for Tony Martin at weekends and holidays. This developed into a full-time job as soon as he could leave school. Taking out his amateur licence at sixteen, Gordon's first winner came in a bumper at Ballinrobe on board Caitriona's Choice, trained by Michael Cunningham for whom Gordon would go on to ride many winners. As a jockey Gordon achieved
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    H. Guy Bedwell

    Harvey Guy Bedwell (June 22, 1874 – January 1, 1952) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and owner who was the first trainer to win the U.S. Triple Crown. Born in Roseburg, Oregon he was known by his middle name. As a young man, Guy Bedwell began working as a cowboy and by the early 1900s owned and raced horses in Colorado before moving to the East Coast of the United States. He raced Thoroughbreds from a base at tracks in Maryland and at Empire City Race Track in New York as well as at Old Woodbine Race Course in Toronto, Canada where he became acquainted with the wealthy stable owner, J. K. L. Ross. In 1909, Bedwell won more races than any trainer in the United States but after New York State legislation banded parimutuel betting and ended racing in that state, Bedwell moved to Kentucky where he conditioned horses at Covington's Latonia Race Track. When racing resumed in New York, Bedwell returned to compete there and repeated as the United States Champion Thoroughbred Trainer by wins from 1912 through 1917. In 1918, he took over as head trainer of the J. K. L. Ross stables in North America. Among his best horses that year was Cudgel who earned American
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Ian Black

    Ian Black is a British journalist and author focusing on international political issues. He is currently Middle East editor at The Guardian newspaper, where he has worked since 1980 as a reporter, Middle East correspondent, diplomatic editor, European editor and leader writer. In 2010, Ian was awarded a Peace through Media Award by the International Council for Press and Broadcasting at the sixth annual International Media Awards in London
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    John Moore

    John Moore (born 17 March 1950 in Sydney, Australia) is a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. The son of jockey and trainer George Moore, he began working in Hong Kong racing as an assistant to his father in 1971. In 1985, John Moore took out his trainers license and built a highly successful career for himself in Hong Kong. Moore has won the Hong Kong Trainers Premiership five times and in 2005 broke Brian Kan's record for most career wins by a trainer in Hong Kong racing. The 74 winners he saddled in 2010/11, highlighted by the success of Xtension in the G1 BMW Champions Mile, brought his career total to 1,211.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    Loyd Gentry, Jr.

    Loyd "Boo" Gentry, Jr. (August 29 1925 – July 1 2012) in was an American horse trainer best known for training Proud Clarion to win the 1967 Kentucky Derby. Born in Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky, Gentry was the son of jockey and trainer, Loyd Gentry, Sr.. His father trained for the prominent Canadian horseman Harry C. Hatch for whom he conditioned the winner of the 1941 King's Plate. Loyd Jr. was also the nephew of Olin B. Gentry, who managed the horse breeding operations of Colonel Edward R. Bradley. Gentry served in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II before beginning his career as a trainer. Gentry competed mainly at race tracks in New York, South Florida, Kentucky, and Illinois. Gentry trained for several major owners including Harry Frank Guggenheim. In 1955 he sent two of Guggenheim's colts to run in the Kentucky Derby: the Bluegrass Stakes winner Racing Fool, ridden by Henry Moreno, finished fourth, and Flying Fury, winner of the Champagne Stakes, ridden by Conn McCreary, ran sixth. He had previously trained Milton Shagrin's Shag Tails, ridden by John Nazareth, to finish thirteenth in 1952. Gentry also won the Kentucky Oaks and the Beldame Stakes with Lalun in
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Terry Jordan

    Terry Jordan is the author of The US Constitution and Fascinating Facts About It, a book dedicated to the founding documents of the United States. This book contains little-known facts about the US Constitution, Articles of Confederation, The Supreme Court, Founding Fathers, and even America's First President (A little-known man named John Hanson). The book also contains the entire US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, all subsequent amendments, and even attempted amendments that failed, such as the 1893 attempt to abolish the US Army and US Navy. Taken from the About the Author (Seventh Edition): Terry Jordan received a BS in Education from Taylor University and a Masters in History from Cleveland State University. He has spent much of his life studying, interpreting, and teaching students about the US Constitution, and taught Advanced Placement US History at Orange High School in Pepper Pike, Ohio. Terry was a public school teacher for thirty-five years and retired at the end of the 2004-2005 school year. He resides in Solon, Ohio, with his wife Linda and three children, Lea, Cali, and Cody. ISBN 0-12-345678-9 Jordan, Terry
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Alec Head

    Alec Head was a prominent French horseman and breeder and the owner of Haras du Quesnay near Deauville. A descendant of the great trainers who founded the English Racing Colony in Chantilly, Oise, Head's grandfather was a jockey-turned-trainer, as was his father William Head who was a very successful jockey, trainer, and owner in both flat racing and steeplechase events. Head undertook a massive restoration of the facilities and in 1959 brought in the farm's first stallion. Over the years he and his wife Ghislaine developed Haras du Quesnay into one of the leading stud farms in France with horses acquired from across Europe and the United States. The farm would be home to prominent sires and broodmares including 1968 Kentucky Derby winner Dancer's Image. In the 1960s, Head reportedly was training 140 horses, the majority being owned by Pierre Wertheimer or the Aga Khan IV. Children of Alec Head have been distinguished participants in the horse racing industry. Daughter Martine is involved with managing Haras du Quesnay, son Freddy was a leading jockey, and daughter Criquette Head is one of France's leading trainers and the most successful female thoroughbred trainer in the world.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    5.75
    4 votes
    126

    Alex Scott

    Alexander Archibald Scott (born February 8, 1960; died 30 September 1994) was a British thoroughbred racehorse trainer who was murdered by an employee with a grievance. He was born the 3rd son of Sir James Scott, the 2nd Baronet of Rotherfield Park and educated at Eton and Queens' College, Cambridge. In his career he trained 164 winners, including the future 1995 Epsom Derby winner Lammtarra and the 1991 Breeders' Cup Sprint winner Sheikh Albadou. Scott married Julia Mary Mackenzie in 1986 and had three children.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127

    Basil Briscoe

    (Arthur) Basil Briscoe (1903 – 1951) was a British racehorse trainer. The son of William Arthur Briscoe, of Longstowe Hall, Cambridgeshire, and May Matilda Boughey, he was educated at Eton College. He ran a mixed stable from the family seat at Longstowe and then Newmarket and was the joint master of the Cambridgeshire Harriers in 1929, based at Bottisham. Briscoe discovered Golden Miller as an unbroken three-year-old in Ireland and encouraged Dorothy Paget to buy him. The horse won four consecutive Cheltenham Gold Cups (1932-1935) for Briscoe (and a fifth in 1936) and the 1934 Grand National, but Paget and Briscoe fell out after the 1935 Grand National when Golden Miller, the pre-race favourite, tried to refuse a fence and unseated his jockey.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    Dan L. Hendricks

    Dan L. Hendricks (born December 5, 1958 in Los Angeles, California) is an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer. Hendricks took out his trainers license in 1987 after working for Richard Mandella for nine years. On July 7, 2004, Dan is paralyzed from the waist down as the result of a motocross accident at Perris, California. Six weeks later he returned to work in a wheelchair. During 2005 and 2006 Hendricks trained Brother Derek to major wins including the Santa Anita Derby.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    David Pipe

    The son of the prolific horseracing trainer Martin Pipe David Pipe is the trainer of the David Johnson owned Comply or Die, who ridden by Timmy Murphy won the 2008 John Smith's Grand National at Aintree racecourse. David Pipe attended Kings College in Taunton.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130

    H. Graham Motion

    H. Graham Motion (born May 22, 1964 in Cambridge, England) is an American horse trainer, notable for his work with 2011 Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom and Better Talk Now. Motion started out training and winning with his own Thoroughbred horses at age 29, his first win was with Bounding Daisy in March 1993 at Laurel Park Racecourse. Graham's father worked as a bloodstock agent. He worked for Johnathan Shepard as an Assistant Trainer from 1985 through 1990. He then worked as an Assistant under trainer Bernie Bond in 1991, then assumed Bond's stable when the trainer retired after 1992. Motion now lives in Fair Hill, Maryland. Motion finished in the top ten of all Maryland conditioners nine times including seven straight years from 1995 through 2001. Motion led all trainers with five stakes wins in the 2008 Pimlico spring meet. Motion won his 1,000th race at Laurel Park Racecourse on November 6, 2006. In 1997 he finished with a career-best 150 races won. In 2008, Motion finished in the top twelve trainers in earnings nationally with over $6,900,000.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    John M. Veitch

    John M. Veitch (born June 27, 1945 in Lexington, Kentucky) is an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred horse trainer. The son of U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer Sylvester Veitch, he belongs to a family that has been in the horse-training business for three generations. Veitch studied at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois where he played fullback on the university's football team. From the beginning of his training career in 1974 through the end of 2003, Veitch won 410 races out of 2,340 starts and his horses earned $20,097,980. He began as an assistant with his father as well as for trainer Elliott Burch at Rokeby Stables before going on his own in 1974. In 1976, he accepted the job as head trainer for Lucille Markey's Calumet Farm where he remained until late 1982. He then trained horses for John W. Galbreath of Darby Dan Farm plus Brian's Time for Jodie and Wally Phillips, Galbreath's sister and brother-in-law. For a time in the early 1980s, he additionally handled the training for the stable of Frances A. Genter. In 1998, he closed his small public stable and took the job of racing consultant to a member of Saudi Arabia's royal family. He returned to the United States in
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Max Hirsch

    Maximilian J. "Max" Hirsch (July 12, 1880 - April 3, 1969) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born in Fredericksburg, Texas, Hirsch became one of the most successful trainers in Thoroughbred horse racing history. He spent part of his formative years working as a groom and jockey at Morris Ranch in Gillespie County, Texas. Hirsch conditioned horses for various owners including George W. Loft, Arthur B. Hancock, Morton L. Schwartz, Jane Greer, and Virginia Fair Vanderbilt but is best known for his work with the King Ranch Stable whom he joined in the 1930s and for whom he trained until his death in 1969. Sarazen was the first Champion Max Hirsch trained and said his win over the French Champion Epinard in the third race of the 1924 International Specials was his greatest thrill in racing. A Hall of Fame inductee, Sarazen was the American Horse of the Year in 1924 and 1925. Max Hirsch won the first of his four Belmont Stakes in 1928 with Vito. In 1936, he won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes with Bold Venture and in 1946 captured the U.S. Triple Crown with Bold Venture's son Assault. In 1950, Hirsch won his third Kentucky Derby with another son of Bold
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Richard E. Dutrow, Sr.

    Richard E. "Dick" Dutrow, Sr. (March 8, 1937 - February 19, 1999) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Dutrow, along with King T. Leatherbury, John J. Tammaro, Jr. and Hall of Fame inductee Bud Delp, were known as Maryland racing's "Big Four". They dominated racing in that state during the 1960s and '70s and helped modernize flat racing training. Richard Dutrow, Sr. began training race horses in the 1950s. Living in Hagerstown, Maryland, where his son Richard Jr. was born in 1959, his success at the small half-mile track in his hometown plus at others in such places as Bel Air, Upper Marlboro and Cumberland as well as at Waterford Park in Chester, West Virginia led to his moving to the larger tracks on the Maryland racing circuit. For many years Dutrow concentrated on making a living through winning as many races as possible through his astute horse selection and his training methods. However, later in his career he competed on the New York racing circuit and developed top Grade I winners such as Lite The Fuse and the horse known as the "King of Aqueduct," King's Swan. He trained future U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee Flawlessly through her two-year-old season before
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Yonnie Starr

    Joseph "Yonnie" Starr (August 11, 1905 – March, 1990) was a Canadian Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer about whom the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame says has a "record unmatched in Canadian racing history." Starr began his career in Thoroughbred racing as a jockey's agent, representing prominent jockeys such as Frank Mann, Pat Remillard, Red Pollard, and George Seabo. At the same time, in an unofficial capacity Starr became involved in the conditioning of horses. As an unlicensed trainer his first win in 1936 was not formally recognized as were the wins of other horses he trained between then and 1952 when he applied for his license. Yonnie Starr earned his first Canadian Horse of the Year honors in 1955 with Ace Marine, a colt whose wins included the three races that four years later were officially designated as the Canadian Triple Crown series. In all, Starr won ten official Triple Crown Classics including four Queen's Plates. His horses earned ten Sovereign Awards and won a record seven Canadian Horse of the Year titles: Ace Marine (1955), Wonder Where (1959), Fanfreluche (1970), La Prevoyante (1972), L'Enjoleur (1974, 1975), L'Alezane (1977). Seven of the horses
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Jenny Pitman

    Jenny Pitman (born 11 June 1946) is a former British racehorse trainer and author. She became the first woman to train a Grand National winner, when Corbiere won the race in 1983. She went on to win a second Grand National with Royal Athlete in 1995. Following her retirement from horse training in 1998 she became a writer of novels, principally with a racing theme. Pitman was born as Jenny Harvey on her family's farm near Hoby, Leicestershire, one of seven children. She was brought up assisting in manual farm work, where horse powered equipment was a novelty, and learned to ride a pony "so young that being on horseback seemed as natural as walking". In 1957 she left the Hoby village school to attend Sarson Secondary Modern Girls' School in Melton Mowbray. She sustained a fractured skull when a showjumping pole fell on her head during a gymkhana at Syston, it was many months before resultant convulsions were diagnosed. At the age of 14, she obtained a weekend and school holiday job at Brooksby Grange horse racing yard. Pitman left school two weeks before her 15th birthday, taking up a position as a stable girl, at Brooksby Grange for a weekly wage of £3 4s 5d. Her first overnight
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Richard C. Dawson

    Richard Cecil "Dick" Dawson (1865 – 1955) was an Irish-born owner and trainer of racehorses. From his home in Cloghran, Dawson went to Lambourn, England in 1897 and set up shop at Whatcombe Stables in Wantage, Oxfordshire. He brought with him the steeplechase horse Drogheda who won the 1898 Grand National. Dawson left Whatcombe Stables to train flat racing horses for newspaper publisher Sir Edward Hulton (1869-1925). He eventually returned to Whatcombe to take charge of the stables for HH Aga Khan III. working with Frederick Hollis as head stable lad,, Frederick Hollis with his wife Caroline née Green from South Fawley lived in tied cottage at Whatcombe, he died around 1943 44 in tied cottage,,,,his son John Hollis born in tied cottage march 29 1930,took over the trainers license at 14 or 15, the youngest person in UK to hold a trainers license,and kept the stables working until he was called for national service, at 18, on a couple of occasions the night before the grand national and other big races they had to move the horses during the night, fearing the opposition would come and drug the horses,,,, Dick Dawson was British Champion Trainer in 1916, 1924 and 1929, winning
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    Shug McGaughey

    Claude R. "Shug" McGaughey, III (born January 6, 1951, in Lexington, Kentucky) is an American Hall of Fame thoroughbred horse trainer. McGaughey began working as a trainer in 1979 and to date has won more than 240 graded stakes races. In 1986, he got his big break when Ogden Phipps hired him to train his stable of horses. In 1988, McGaughey won the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer in the United States. Among his many wins, he has captured the Jockey Club Gold Cup and the Travers Stakes three times each and won the 1989 Belmont Stakes with Hall of Fame Champion Easy Goer. McGaughey's nine Breeders' Cup victories ranks second to D. Wayne Lukas. Among the other horses he has trained are back-to-back Breeders' Cup Mile winner Lure and Hall of Famer Personal Ensign. McGaughey has accomplished the rare trifecta of training a Breeders' Cup winner, her daughter, and her granddaughter in the troika of Personal Ensign, My Flag and Storm Flag Flying. In 2004, McGaughey was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. At his induction ceremony, he said: "My deepest debt of gratitude always has been and always will be to the Phipps family" -- "My affiliation with the
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    Sonny Hine

    Hubert "Sonny" Hine (January 9, 1931 – March 17, 2000) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred horse trainer best known as the trainer of 1998 U.S. Horse of the Year, Skip Away. Hine was born in The Bronx, New York, the son of clothing merchant and trainer Arthur Hine. Predating his training career in horse racing he often rode match races with his brother, Marvin. His training career began after high school upon hitchhiking to Charles Town and training Miss Economy at Marlboro Race Course. Before becoming a trainer, Sonny joined the United States Air Force and attended Yale University for a year. While enrolled in a pre-veterinary course at Pennsylvania State University he was contacted by the United States Department of State to become a special investigator in Hong Kong, allowing him to become fluent in Mandarin Chinese. Sonny Hine became a full-time trainer in 1957, struggling upward with horses such as Amber Pass, Bet Big, Cojak, Guilty Conscience, Norquestor, Royal Hierarchy, Skip Trial and Technology, securing himself at venues such as the Monmouth Park and Meadowlands Racetracks. With Skip Away, Sonny Hine won the 1997 Breeders' Cup Classic at Hollywood Park Racetrack.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    Barry Littlefield

    Barak Thomas "Barry" Littlefield (June 16, 1871 – June 14, 1936 is an American-born Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. From a Canadian mother, he was born in Preakness, New Jersey where his American father Charles Stuart Littlefield (1833–1915), was employed by Milton Holbrook Sanford's Preakness Stables. His father worked as a jockey in Toronto and is also an inductee of the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame who won the first ever edition of the Queen's Plate in 1860 and again in 1862 and as a trainer, won the 1885 Preakness Stakes. His brother, Fred Littlefield, was a jockey who won the 1888 Preakness Stakes. Nicknamed Barry, his father named him after a close friend, Major Barak G. Thomas, a lawyer and American Civil War officer who established Dixiana Farm in Lexington, Kentucky in 1887 where he bred such horses as United States Racing Hall of Fame inductee Domino and owned the 1893 Leading sire in North America, Himyar. Between 1902 and 1917, Barry Littlefield trained for the highly successful racing stable owned by the Waterloo, Ontario distilling magnate, Joseph E. Seagram. Littlefield was a multiple winner of every top Canadian flat race of
    8.00
    1 votes
    141

    Charles Peoples

    Charles Peoples (February 3, 1924 – September 17, 1999) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. In the latter part of the 1950s, he started conditioning horses for the operations of Bayard Sharp, a director of Delaware Park Racetrack and a president of The Blood-Horse Inc. Unknown to each other at the time they came together in racing, Bayard Sharp had been the teenage stranger who had saved a four-year-old Charles Peoples and a small girl from drowning when he pulled them out of the bottom of a pond. Based at Sharp Farm in Middletown, Delaware, Charles Peoples won a number of important races. In 1959 he won the Flamingo Stakes at Hialeah Park Race Track with Troilus. Sent to the Kentucky Derby, under jockey Chris Rogers, Troilus moved from his tenth starting position into the lead at the half-mile mark but then stopped badly and finished last. It was later discovered that the promising colt had been suffering from an ulcer and he died later that year from peritonitis. Peoples also trained Dixieland Band, winner of the 1983 Pennsylvania Derby and the 1984 Massachusetts Handicap plus in 1985 won the Grade I Hopeful Stakes with Papal Power. Charles Peoples died in 1999 at
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    Jack Van Berg

    John Charles "Jack" Van Berg (born June 7, 1936 in Columbus, Nebraska) is an American Hall of Fame horse trainer. Born into a horse racing family, his father is Hall of Fame trainer, Marion Van Berg. For nineteen straight years between 1959 and 1977, Jack Van Berg was the leading trainer at Ak-Sar-Ben Racetrack in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1976, he set a record for the most wins in a year with 496 and was also the United States Champion Thoroughbred Trainer by earnings. The trainer of Gate Dancer, he was voted the 1984 Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer and in 1985 he was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. In 1987 he received the Big Sport of Turfdom Award. He is also an inductee of the Nebraska Racing Hall of Fame. On July 15, 1987 Jack Van Berg became the first trainer to win 5,000 races when he sent Art's Chandelle to victory at Arlington Park. As at the end of September 2008, Jack Van Berg ranks second all-time in career wins among American Thoroughbred trainers. Jack Van Berg is best known for training Alysheba who won the 1987 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes and the 1988 Breeders' Cup Classic. He has mentored many top trainers, including Hall of
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    Johnny Longden

    John Eric Longden (February 14, 1907 – February 14, 2003) was an American Hall of Fame jockey who was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire, England. His father emigrated to Canada in 1909, settling in Taber, Alberta. By 1912, Longden Sr. had saved enough money to send for his wife and young son to join him in Canada. However, the Longdens' train was late getting to the port of Southampton, and they missed their scheduled voyage to New York City on the Titanic. As a young man, Johnny Longden worked in the mining industry. His love of horses and horse-racing led him to leave Canada in 1927 to seek opportunities as a jockey in California's burgeoning racing scene. Based at Santa Anita Park, by 1956 he had become thoroughbred racing's winningest rider, breaking the record of 4,870 wins by British jockey Sir Gordon Richards (1904–1988). During his illustrious career, Longden, who was called "The Pumper" by his fellow jockeys because of his riding style, rode many of the great thoroughbreds of the day. In 1943, he captured the United States Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing winning the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes aboard Count Fleet. A sculptured bust of
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Paul Cole

    Paul F. I. Cole (born 11 September 1941) is a British racehorse trainer. Since 1987 he has been based at Whatcombe Estate in Oxfordshire, the former stables of Dick Dawson and Arthur Budgett. He was British flat racing Champion Trainer in 1991, the year in which he trained Generous to win the Epsom Derby. Notable owners he has trained for include Prince Fahd bin Salman and Martyn Arbib, and regular jockeys have been Richard Quinn and Alan Munro. Great Britain Canada France Germany Ireland Italy United States
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Vincent O'Brien

    Dr. Michael Vincent O'Brien (9 April 1917 - 1 June 2009) was an Irish race horse trainer from Churchtown, County Cork, Ireland. In 2003 he was voted the greatest influence in horse racing history, according to a worldwide poll hosted by the Racing Post newspaper. In separate earlier Racing Post polls he was voted the best ever trainer of national hunt and of flat racehorses. He trained six horses to win the Epsom Derby, was twice British champion trainer, won three Grand Nationals in succession and trained the only British Triple Crown winner since the 2nd World War, to name but a few of his many achievements. O'Brien was not related to Aidan O'Brien, who took over the Ballydoyle stables after his retirement. In his early days Vincent O'Brien was a trainer of steeplechasers and hurdlers, and won the Grand National at Liverpool three times in succession, with three different horses - Early Mist in 1953, Royal Tan in 1954, and Quare Times in 1955. Probably the greatest steeplechaser he trained was Cottage Rake, which won the Cheltenham Gold Cup three times in succession (1948-1950). He later trained Knock Hard to also win the Cheltenham Gold Cup (1953). He also won the Champion
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Clive Brittain

    Clive Brittain (born 15 December 1934) is a British race-horse trainer. He began training as an apprentice in 1949, and on his own as a licensed trainer in the early 1970s. He currently trains at Carlburg Stables in Newmarket, Suffolk. His best-known horse is Pebbles, winner of the 1,000 Guineas in 1984 and the Breeders' Cup Turf in 1985. Great Britain France Germany Hong Kong Ireland Italy Japan United States
    5.25
    4 votes
    149

    Alain de Royer-Dupré

    Alain de Royer-Dupré (born 24 September 1944) is a leading French thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He grew up at the Haras de Saint Lô, a national stud farm in Normandy of which his father was Assistant Director and later Director, responsible for government-owned stallions (thoroughbreds, half-breds, trotters and in particular the Selle Français saddle horse) based at farms in the local region. He worked at the Haras du Mesnil, Mme Jean Couturié’s stud in Normandy, for eight years and started his career there training three of his own jumpers. On 23 April 1972 he trained his first winner, El Morucho, in a steeplechase at Nantes. After setting up as a public trainer at Montfort Le Rotrou in Normandy, training second-string horses for the Aga Khan and Baron Guy de Rothschild with considerable success in the French provinces, he moved to Aiglemont, Chantilly to take over as the Aga Khan’s principal trainer in 1981 after the death of Francois Mathet. He has trained many notable winners around the world for the Aga Khan. Alain de Royer-Dupré has won Group/Grade 1 races in eight different countries on three continents. He has won all of the French classics at least twice. Among his best
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Anthony S. Cruz

    Anthony S. "Tony" Cruz (born December 24, 1956 in Hong Kong) is a prominent horse trainer and former Champion Thoroughbred horse racing jockey. Son of J. M. da Cruz, himself a well-known jockey, Tony Cruz is of Portuguese descent. He became an apprentice jockey at the age of 14. Referred to as a racing legend by the Hong Kong Jockey Club, Cruz began his professional riding in 1973 and earned his first win on December 11, 1974 at Happy Valley Racecourse. After becoming one of Hong Kong's top jockeys, in the late 1980s he rode in England and France where he enjoyed considerable success, capturing a number of prestigious Group One races. Cruz has been Hong Kong's champion jockey six times and has won more races there than any other jockey. When he retired from riding he embarked on a career as a trainer that has led to more success. He won the Hong Kong Derby four times aboard Co-Tack (1983), Tea For Two II (1987), Clear City (1988), Makarpura Star (1995). He has also ridden to victory in the Hong Kong Champions & Chater Cup on two occasions. In 2010/11 in which he won 72 races, including two HKG1s and the G1 CXHK Mile with Beauty Flash, for a career total of 801. Notably he trained
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    Barry Hills

    Barry Hills (born 2 April 1937) is a retired British thoroughbred horse trainer. He lives in Lambourn, England. Barry Hills had three sons in his first marriage: John, Michael, and Richard. John is a horse trainer, and both Michael and Richard are jockeys. After his divorce, he married Penny Hills, and had two more sons, Charles and George. Charles is current trainer and George who provides Bloodstock Insurance in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. In the mid-1950s, Barry was an apprentice jockey to Fred Rimell and to George Collin. In 1959 he was the head lad of John Oxley. In 1969, he acquired a horse training license and began training horses at South Bank Stables in Lambourn. In 1986, he moved to Robert Sangster's Manton Yard where he remained until 1990, when he moved back to South Bank. By the end of 2000, he had trained 2166 winning horses in Britain. He trained his 3,000th winner, when Chapter And Verse won at Pontract on 7 April 2009. In 2009 he was presented with two Lifetime Achievement Awards at the Animal Health Trust Equine Awards and at the Derby Awards, both in London. He ended his training career on 22 August 2011 and his son, Charles Hills, took over the license. Great
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Christophe Clement

    Christophe Clement

    Christophe Clement (born November 1, 1965 in Paris, France) is a Thoroughbred horse trainer in the United States. Christophe Clement initially acquired his training skills from father Miguel, a leading trainer in France, Christophe later worked for the prominent French racing family of trainer Alec Head. In the US, Christophe studied under Hall Of Fame conditioner Shug McGaughey before returning to Europe to work as assistant to trainer Luca Cumani in Newmarket, England. Christophe's first winner was the first horse he saddled, Spectaculaire, at Belmont in 1991. Since then, he has been a prolific force in graded stakes around the country including wins with Trampoli, Danish winner of the 1994 Queen Elizabeth II stakes at Keeneland, Voodoo Dancer, Blu Tusmani, Relaxed Gesture, Flag Down, Statesmanship, Coretta, Honor Glide, Dedication, Dynever, Forbidden Apple, and England's Legend who won the Beverly D. in 2001. He had a repeat win in the 2007 Beverly D. with Royal Highness. Other highlights of 2007 were stakes winners Meribel, Gio Ponti, Revved Up, Naissance Royale, Vacare, In Summation, and Rutherienne who won six stakes, among them five graded victories. Through February 2008,
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Dale L. Romans

    Dale L. Romans (born August 14, 1966 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. The son of a trainer, Dale Romans is best known for training the winner of the 2011 Preakness Stakes, Shackleford. He grew up around horse racing at Churchill Downs. At age eighteen he embarked on a career as a trainer, getting his first winner on February 15, 1987 at Turfway Park in Florence, Kentucky. Among his most successful horses, Kitten's Joy won the 2004 Secretariat Stakes and the Joe Hirsch Turf Classic Invitational Handicap as his only two Grade I wins. He also ran second to Better Talk Now in the 2004 Breeders' Cup Turf. This was enough to be voted the Eclipse Award for American Champion Male Turf Horse. In 2005 Roses in May provided Romans with the biggest payday of his career to date when he won the $6 million Dubai World Cup. He collected his first Breeders' Cup win in 2009 when Tapitsfly won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Doug O'Neill

    Douglas F. "Doug" O'Neill (May 24, 1968) is an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. He was born in Dearborn, Michigan, and resides in California, where he trained the 2012 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner, I'll Have Another. Based at Hollywood Park Racetrack, O'Neill and his family reside in Santa Monica, California. In 1986 he began working in Thoroughbred horse racing as a stable hand and eventually a training assistant. In 1994 he obtained his professional trainer's license and since the early 2000s has been a major figure on the California racing scene, with the largest stable in Southern California and one of the largest and most successful in the United States. He gained national attention for his Breeders' Cup wins and international recognition for winning the 2003 Japan Cup Dirt at Tokyo Racecourse. Two horses trained by O'Neill, Liquidity and Great Hunter, raced in the 2007 Kentucky Derby. This was O'Neill's first and second start in the Kentucky Derby. Canadian owned I'll Have Another, trained by O'Neill, won the 2012 Kentucky Derby on May 5, 2012. As a result of medication violations, O'Neill has been nicknamed "'Drug' O'Neill." According to New York Times
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Gil Rowntree

    Gil H. Rowntree (born January 17, 1934 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and owner. One of the most successful trainers in Canadian Thoroughbred racing history, Rowntree embarked on his racing career as a jockey in his native Toronto, riding from 1949 through 1951. As a trainer, he learned his conditioning skills as an assistant to Hall of Fame trainer and Kentucky Derby winner, Lou Cavalaris, Jr. Rowntree obtained his trainer's license in 1959 and was hired by Stafford Farms in 1967 where he remained until the death of owner Jack Stafford in 1981. During his training career, Gil Rowntree won eight Canadian Classic Races and following the creation of the Sovereign Awards program in 1975 he was voted the first-ever winner as Canada's Outstanding Trainer. In 1973, Gil Rowntree set a record when horses he trained ran 1-2-3 in the Prince of Wales Stakes, the second leg of the Canadian Triple Crown series. Although Rowntree has won four editions of Canada's most prestigious race, the Queen's Plate, he is best known as the trainer of the 1978 Queen's Plate runner-up, Overskate. The Hall of Fame colt was twice voted Canadian Horse of the Year
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    J. Larry Jones

    J. Larry Jones (born September 2, 1956 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky) is an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer. A former commercial farmer, he embarked on a career as a professional trainer in 1982. Jones trained at principally at Ellis Park Racecourse in Henderson, Kentucky, and at Oaklawn Park Race Track in Hot Springs, Arkansas, before coming into national prominence in 2007 with the front-running bay colt Hard Spun. Hard Spun brought Jones into the spotlight with his runner-up finishes in the Kentucky Derby and Breeder's Cup Classic, as well as impressive victories in the Lane's End, King's Bishop, and Kentucky Cup Classic Stakes. In 2008, Jones was again in the nation's spotlight, this time with the talented fillies Proud Spell and Eight Belles. He saddled Proud Spell to a decisive win over a sloppy track in the Kentucky Oaks (G1). (Proud Spell went on to win the Eclipse Award as top three-year-old filly that year, becoming Jones's first Eclipse Award winner.) The day after the Kentucky Oaks, Jones saddled his other top filly, Eight Belles, to run in the Kentucky Derby. Following the race, Eight Belles, the first filly to run second in the Derby in over one hundred years,
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    John E. Hammond

    John E. Hammond (born June 27, 1960 in Bromley, Kent, England) is a Thoroughbred horse trainer in France. Based in Chantilly, Oise, Hammond has trained numerous Group One winners including Montjeu and Suave Dancer both of whom won the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, France's most prestigious horse race. Hammond's horses have also won important races in Ireland and Great Britain. Hammond also trained useful European and latterly American based sprinter, Nuclear Debate. France Canada Great Britain Hong Kong Ireland United States
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    John Scott

    John Scott (1794–1871) was the preeminent horse trainer in British Thoroughbred racing during the 19th century. Known as "The Wizard of the North," he was a brother to the successful jockey Bill Scott. During his career, John Scott trained for notable owners such as the 14th Earl of Derby, the 6th Viscount Falmouth, and John Bowes. He also trained for Edward Petre of Stapleton Park in Darrington parish, North Yorkshire who owned Whitewall Stables in Malton. When Petre went bankrupt in the early 1840s, Scott acquired the operation which remains in business to this day. Between 1827 and 1863, John Scott won a record forty British Classic Races and in 1853 became the first trainer to win the English Triple Crown when his colt West Australian won the 2,000 Guineas, the Epsom Derby, and the St. Leger Stakes. John Scott died in 1876. A miniature watercolour portrait titled "John Scott of Whitewall Malton" from the English School (19th century) is on display at the Bowes Museum. His Whitewall Stables is today owned by trainer Mark Campion. † Note: Scott may have won more editions of the Ascot Gold Cup, Doncaster Gold Cup, and the Northumberland Plate than reopted here.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    Lee Freedman

    David Lee Freedman (born 12 August 1956) is a prominent Australian racehorse trainer. In partnership with brothers Anthony, Michael, and Richard, he has been a prolific winner of Australia's major races in past 20 years, with four Golden Slippers, four Caulfield Cups, two Cox Plates, and five Melbourne Cups, including two of the three won by Makybe Diva. On 19 June 2007 he won the prestigious King's Stand Stakes at England's Royal Ascot racecourse with his champion mare, Miss Andretti. Freedman was born 12 August 1956, in Sydney to Anthony William and Estelle Dawn Freedman. He gained an interest in racing at a young age as his father Tony took up horse breeding and training after retiring as a property developer. Educated at The Scots College in Sydney, Freedman studied at Australian National University for a year, but was quickly bored and dropped out to become involved in the breeding industry himself, running the stud farm owned by the family, near Yass in Southern NSW. Freedman quickly tired of this, and decided to branch out on his own as a horse trainer, initially setting up stables at Warwick Farm in Sydney. Training only a small team of horses, Freedman and stable foreman
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    Cam Gambolati

    Cam M. Gambolati (born September 29, 1949 in Manchester, Connecticut) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer best known for winning the 1985 Kentucky Derby with Spend A Buck. Gambolati worked as a Laundromat operator and as a statistician for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League. He has had a long association with racehorse owner and University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino who heads a racing partnership competing as the Ol Memorial Stable .
    6.00
    3 votes
    161

    John Dunlop

    John L. Dunlop (born 10 July 1939 in Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England) is a successful race horse trainer based in Arundel, Sussex, with over 3000 winners between 1966 and 2002. He was the British flat racing Champion Trainer in 1995. Dunlop is also a trustee of the British Racing School. Great Britain France Germany Ireland Italy
    6.00
    3 votes
    162

    Michael Dickinson

    Michael W. Dickinson (born 3 February 1950 in Yorkshire, England) is a retired Champion Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Having been educated at Rossall School, Dickinson was an amateur champion rider before becoming a professional jockey for 10 years. His rides included a Classic winner, Boucher. Dickinson got his trainer's license in 1980, taking over his parents' stables. He trained at Dunkeswick near Harewood in Yorkshire and was the Champion Trainer of National Hunt racing for three years in England. Two of his formative years were spent under the tutelage of Vincent O'Brien, the legendary Irish trainer who was master of Ballydoyle, the training center in County Tipperary. Michael Dickinson is perhaps most famous for his extraordinary feat of training the first five in the 1983 Cheltenham Gold Cup. In order: Bregawn, Captain John, Wayward Lad, Silver Buck, and Ashley House. The BBC has an interesting account of Dickinson's Famous Five. He also trained a record 12 winners on Boxing Day in 1982, both of which are in the Guinness Book of World Records. He has three other further world records noted in the Guinness Book of World Records. Dickinson also briefly trained flat racing
    6.00
    3 votes
    163

    Aidan O'Brien

    Aidan Patrick O'Brien (born 16 October 1969 in County Wexford, Ireland) is an Irish horse racing trainer. Since 1996, he has been the private trainer at Ballydoyle Stables near Cashel in County Tipperary for John Magnier and his Coolmore Stud associates. Aidan O'Brien was one of six children of Denis O'Brien (d. 1 December 2008) and his wife Stella (née Doyle). Denis was a farmer and small-scale horse trainer in the townland of Killegney, near Poulpeasty, in County Wexford, where Aidan grew up. Aidan O'Brien attended Donard National School, located less than a mile from his parents' home. He subsequently attended secondary school at Good Counsel College, New Ross, also located in County Wexford. O'Brien is a member of the Pioneer Total Abstinence Association, meaning that he does not drink alcohol. O'Brien first started working professionally with horses at P.J. Finn's racing stables at the Curragh, County Kildare, and then with Jim Bolger at Coolcullen, County Carlow. Aidan O'Brien is married to Anne-Marie (née Crowley). Anne-Marie's father, Joe Crowley trained horses at Piltown, County Kilkenny, where his tenure was interrupted in quick succession by his daughter Anne-Marie
    4.40
    5 votes
    164

    Ginger McCain

    Donald "Ginger" McCain (21 September 1930 – 19 September 2011) was an English National Hunt horse trainer, perhaps best known for training Red Rum. A successful trainer who won many races, he trained Red Rum at a Southport beach on Merseyside, where McCain was born. A former national serviceman in the Royal Air Force as a motorcycle despatch rider, he was also a member of the RAF scrambling team. McCain applied for a training permit in 1953 and began training horses in 1962, using small stables behind the showroom of his used-car store in his hometown of Southport. He bought a horse for 6,000 guineas, which later turned out to be suffering from a debilitating bone disease. The horse was Red Rum. McCain went on to train the winner of the world-famous Grand National steeplechase four times, three times in the 1970s with Red Rum and a fourth time in 2004 with Amberleigh House. His first and fourth victories were over 30 years apart. The 1973 Grand National is considered by many to be the greatest Grand National and was a famous dual of 9 mins 2 secs between Red Rum and Crisp (horse), with L'Escargot (horse) (a previous double Cheltenham Gold Cup winner and future 1975 Grand National
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Josh Gifford

    Josh Gifford

    Josh Gifford (3 August 1941 – 9 February 2012) was a jockey and trainer in National Hunt racing. He was a four-time Champion Jockey, riding 642 winners in his career. Gifford was born in Huntingdon. At the age of 28, he turned to training racehorses, with Frank Pullen being his first owner, and later trained Aldaniti, the winner of the 1981 Grand National. He was played by Edward Woodward in the 1983 film Champions. His training stables, which he took over from his former boss, Captain H. Ryan Price, were located in Findon, West Sussex. His daughter, Kristina Cook, won two eventing bronze medals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, in both the team and individual events, and a silver medal in the team event at the 2012 London Olympics. He died in the early hours of 9 February 2012 at his Findon yard in West Sussex, after suffering a heart attack.
    5.67
    3 votes
    166

    Michael Keogh

    Michael Keogh, known as Max Keogh (died April 2001) was a nationalist politician and journalist in Northern Ireland. Based in Newry, Keogh became the editor of the Frontier Sentinel. Keogh was elected to Newry Urban District Council, as a member of the Anti-Partition League of Ireland, and became Chairman in 1949, holding the post until 1958. He was succeeded by a war of Independence veteran, Tom Kelly following the Irish Labour Party landslide. He held various posts in the Nationalist Party, including Secretary of the party's Executive from 1966. He was also elected Secretary of the Newry branch of Unity. In 1967, Keogh was elected to the Parliament of Northern Ireland, representing the Nationalists in South Down. He held his seat until the Parliament was abolished in 1973. He was invited to join the Social Democratic and Labour Party on its formation, but chose to remain a Nationalist Party member.
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    W. Elliott Walden

    W. Elliott Walden (born February 10, 1963 in Lexington, Kentucky) is the President and CEO of racing operations for WinStar Farm near Versailles, Kentucky and a former Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. From a racing family, Walden grew up in the industry. He worked as an assistant for high-profile trainers such as LeRoy Jolley and John Gosden before taking out his trainers’ license in 1985 and trained four horses for his father, Ben P. Walden, Sr. In 1998, Elliott Walden conditioned Victory Gallop to a win in the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the U.S. Triple Crown series. The following year Victory Gallop gave Walden his first Champion when he was voted the 1999 American Champion Older Male Horse. In 2002 Walden took over training of the Winstar Farm racing stable and in 2003 was appointed vice president of racing and bloodstock services.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168

    Robert P. Tiller

    Robert P. Tiller (born December 11, 1949 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands) is a Canadian Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. A resident of Brampton, Ontario, in 1972 he embarked on a career conditioning horses and in 2007 marked the eighteenth straight year he has been one of the top-five trainers at Toronto's Woodbine Racetrack. In 2001, Tiller trained Win City who was voted that year's Canadian Horse of the Year. Robert Tiller has won four Woodbine training titles, capturing top honours in 1994, 1997, 2001, and 2003. He was voted the Sovereign Award as Canada's outstanding trainer in 2001, 2003, and 2004. In 2008 he was inducted in the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. On December 3, 2008, Tiller earned his 1,500th career win when Dancer's Bajan won the Sir Barton Stakes at Woodbine Racetrack. Robert Tiller has also owned several horses, notably in partnership with client, Frank Di Giulio, Jr..
    4.75
    4 votes
    169

    Angel Penna, Sr.

    Angel A. Penna, Sr. (September 30, 1923 –January 15, 1992) was an Argentine-born U. S. Racing Hall of Fame Thoroughbred horse trainer. Penna was an international trainer who worked and raced on three continents. He conditioned more than 250 graded stakes race winners during a career that began in 1950 and lasted for more than forty years. Born in Buenos Aires to a racing family, Angel Penna's father, father-in-law, and an uncle were all horse trainers. Angel Penna worked as an assistant to his father until going out on his own in 1942. He won leading trainer honors in his native Argentina in 1952 and in Venezuela in 1954 then began competing in the United States. After moving permanently to the U.S. in 1961 he raced at tracks from coast to coast and was notably successful with Harry F. Guggenheim's colt, Bold Reason. In 1972, Angel Penna went to France where he would become a major figure in European Thoroughbred racing. Penna won the 1972 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe with the filly San San. Hired by leading French horseman Daniel Wildenstein, Penna won his second Arc in 1974 with the future Hall of Fame filly Allez France and earned French Leading Trainer honors that year. In
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Frank Catrone

    Frank Catrone, Jr. (born c.1904) was an American Thoroughbred horse racing jockey who best known for winning the 1965 Kentucky Derby as a trainer. Catrone stood 4-feet 9-inches tall and while selling newspapers at a stand outside Saratoga Race Course in Saratoga Springs, New York, the diminutive 17-year-old was offered the chance to train to be a jockey by future U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer, Sam Hildreth. Although Catrone met with some success as a jockey, it was as a trainer where he would achieve nationwide recognition. Battling weioght problems, in 1936 he began his professional career as a trainer and in the early 1940s enjoyed success training for Texan Emerson F. Woodward's Valdina Farms. Among his successes for Valdina, Catrone won the 1942 Derby Trial Stakes with Valdina Orphan who then earned a third-place finish to winner Shut Out in the Kentucky Derby. By 1964 Catrone was the secondary trainer behind Clyde Troutt for the breeding/racing stable of Dan and Ada Rice. When the Rice's decided to race at Santa Anita Park over the winter of 1964-65, one of the horses Catrone brought West was a colt named Lucky Debonair who had made only one start at age two at the Atlantic
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    Ian Balding

    Ian Balding (born November 7, 1938 in the United States) emigrated with his family to England in 1945. He is the son of the polo player and racehorse trainer Gerald Barnard Balding, Sr. and the younger brother of trainer Toby Balding. Kingsclere became his home at the age of 26 and it is here that earned his reputation as an internationally respected trainer. Balding was educated at Marlborough College and Millfield school in Somerset. He principally trains horses for flat races, but did however bring Crystal Spirit to victory in 1991 at the Sun Alliance Novices' Hurdle. Ian Balding has had influence on many top class thoroughbreds and race horses, amongst whom some are; Mill Reef, Lochsong, Mrs Penny, Glint of Gold, Diamond Shoal, Gold and Ivory, Selkirk, Forest Flower, Dashing Blade, Robellino, Silver Fling, King Of Clubs, Lochangel,Top Cees, Crystal Spirit, and Tagula. Ian Balding retired in 2002 and gave his Park House stables licence at Kingsclere, Berkshire, to his son Andrew. Balding was trainer of the winning horse, Mill Reef (1968–1986), ridden by Geoff Lewis, in the 1971 The Derby Stakes or Epsom Derby. The winning time was recorded at 2:37.14. Balding was again Mill
    7.00
    1 votes
    172

    James W. Smith

    James W. "Jimmy" Smith (b.c. 1905) was an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. He was the son of Tom Smith, trainer of Seabiscuit. James Smith trained for automotive industrialist Charles T. Fisher and won the 1940 Arlington Classic with Fisher's colt, Sirocco. A few years later he trained for the renowned owner of Idle Hour Stock Farm, Edward R. Bradley, for whom he earlier rode as a jockey, riding and winning on such stars of the turf Black Helen at 2 and Blue Larkspur at 4, among others. Along with his father, James Smith trained for Maine Chance Farm. On February 15, 1949, James W. Smith trained his last horse for Maine Chance Farm, winning the feature race at Florida's Hialeah Park Race Track with Royal Blood. In 1946 he had three horses in the Kentucky Derby, the best finish a fourth place with Lord Boswell. James Smith's last Derby entrant was in 1961 with Jay Fox. James trained Champions Busher, By Jimminy, Bridal Flower, Myrtle Charm. He also trained Champions But Why Not (no SW), Star Pilot (no SW) and Beaugay (multiple SW).
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Jim Bolger

    James S. "Jim" Bolger (born December 25, 1941) is a thoroughbred racehorse trainer and breeder based in Coolcullen in County Kilkenny. For many years he has been recognised as one of the racing greats in Ireland. Aidan O'Brien, Tony McCoy and Paul Carberry were all apprenticed to him before gaining professional recognition in their own right. During the 2006 flat season, Bolger trained Teofilo to go unbeaten at the age of two. This five race unbeaten streak included victories in the Group 1 National Stakes and Dewhurst Stakes. Talk of an English Triple Crown bid was imminent but Teofilo suffered a career ending injury in the lead up to the 2,000 Guineas and never saw a racecourse again. Bolger was criticized for his handling of this situation. 2007 saw another Bolger-bred star emerge in the shape of New Approach. He followed exactly the same path as Teofilo during his two year old career and again was unbeaten. In 2008 Bolger informed the public that New Approach would go to Newmarket for the Guineas followed by a trip to the Curragh for the Irish 2,000 Guineas and then on for a tilt at the Irish Derby. New Approach could only finish second in both Guineas, however, behind the
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    Joe Orseno

    Joseph F. Orseno (born October 4, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He began his career as a professional trainer in 1977 and in 1997 joined Frank Stronach's racing stables. In 2000, Orseno conditioned Red Bullet, an upset winner of the Preakness Stakes. He went on to win two Breeders' Cup races that fall: the Juvenile with Macho Uno and the Filly & Mare Turf with Perfect Sting. In July 2002, Joe Orseno returned to running a public stable.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    John Porter

    John Porter

    John Porter (2 March 1838 – 21 February 1922) was an English Thoroughbred flat racing trainer whose horses won the English Triple Crown three times. He was also the founder of Newbury Racecourse in Berkshire, England. Born in Rugeley, Staffordshire, the National Horseracing Museum says that John Porter "was undoubtedly the most successful trainer of the Victorian era." He left school in 1852, as his father was eager for him to join the legal profession. However, John Porter visited John Day’s stables while on holiday and was impressed with what he saw. He was so impressed in fact that he became Day’s pupil and was apprenticed as a light-weight jockey at 4 stone 10lbs. Upon John Day’s retirement, Porter continued his apprenticeship with Michael Grove. From 1854 to 1855, John Porter worked at Downs House in Stable Lane, Findon, West Sussex. Stable owner Henry Padwick entrusted the astute sixteen-year-old with the stables' financial administration and responsibility for the yard's management. Porter was given his first chance to train by Sir Joseph Hawley. During his career he also trained for King George V, the Duke of Westminster, The Duke of Portland, the Earl of Crewe and Earl of
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    John Servis

    John C. Servis (born October 25, 1958 in Charles Town, West Virginia) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer who was relatively unknown until May 2004 when his horse Smarty Jones won the Kentucky Derby. The colt then went on to win the Preakness Stakes further increasing Servis' reputation. Servis trains horses primarily out of Philadelphia Park in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. He was born into a family involved in the Thoroughbred racing industry. As a boy, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where his father worked as a jockey. Servis trained his 1,000th winner on May 1, 2007 at Philadelphia Park. John lives with his wife, Sherry, and two sons, Blane and John Tyler. John is also the brother-in-law to Florida Thoroughbred trainer, Edward Plesa.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Kenneth McPeek

    Kenneth McPeek

    Kenneth G. McPeek (born August 2, 1962 in Fort Chaffee, Arkansas) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Kenneth G. McPeek was born August 2, 1962 in Fort Chaffee, Arkansas and raised in Lexington, Kentucky. He graduated from Tates Creek High School and then the University of Kentucky with a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration. In 1985 Kenny took out his trainer's license in Kentucky and won his first race soon after. He won the most important race of his career and got his big break in 2002 when Sarava captured the Belmont Stakes. That year, he and wife Sue were voted the Big Sport of Turfdom Award by the Turf Publicists of America. McPeek has found and/or trained such quality racehorses as Sarava, (Belmont winner) Curlin, (All time leading money earner) Dream Empress, Tejano Run, Harlan’s Holiday, Hard Buck (BRZ), Repent, Take Charge Lady, Sweet Talker, Leah's Secret, She’s A Devil Due,Wild Desert, Einstein(BRZ), Prince Arch, Noble’s Promise, Kathmanblu and Rogue Romance, among others. McPeek has won more than 115 stakes in his career, with over 40 of them graded and in 2009, he surpassed 1000 winners. In 2002, he won the Belmont Stakes with Sarava. He has won
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    LeRoy Jolley

    LeRoy S. Jolley (born 1937 in Hot Springs, Arkansas) is an United States Hall of Fame Thoroughbred horse trainer. The son of horse trainer Moody Jolley, LeRoy Jolley has been around horses all his life at age nineteen received a New York State trainer's license. In 1961, the 24-year-old LeRoy Jolley was the trainer of the colt Ridan who at age two went undefeated in seven races including wins in the Arlington Futurity and the Washington Park Futurity. Owned by his family along with two other partners, at age three Ridan gave LeRoy Jolley victory in record time in the Hibiscus Stakes, plus the first of his three Blue Grass Stakes wins. He then earned the first of his two Florida Derbys while defeating the future Hall of Fame filly, Cicada. The heavy favorite going into the Kentucky Derby, Ridan ran wide throughout the race and wound up third in a hard fought race where he and Roman Line finished a neck behind upset winner Decidedly whom Ridan had easily beaten in the Blue Grass stakes. In that year's Travers Stakes at the Saratoga Race Course, Ridan lost by a fraction of a nose to Jaipur in one of the most dramatic races in American Thoroughbred racing history and one that is still
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Tommy Smith

    Thomas John Smith AM MBE (3 September 1916 – 2 September 1998) also known as Tommy Smith or T. J. Smith was a leading trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses based in Sydney, Australia. He is acknowledged for his record number of Sydney Trainers Premierships and for training many champion racehorses including Tulloch, Gunsynd and Kingston Town. Smith was based at Randwick Racecourse during his career and trained out of the Tulloch Lodge stables. Born in Jembaicumbene (near Braidwood, New South Wales) and raised at the small town of Goolgowi in the Riverina district of New South Wales, young Tommy worked with his father. driving bullock teams and breaking in horses. When Tommy looked back on his life, he would always recall with regret the lack of formal education that he received. Tommy yearned to be a famous jockey and as a child won many races for his father at the picnic races. Smith rode as a jockey until he was age 20, but he was never very good. When weight became a problem he took to hurdle racing, but a bad fall and broken hip ended his riding career. Smith became a trainer, acquiring his license in 1941. His first success came in 1942 with Bragger a rogue horse he bought from
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Carl Nafzger

    Carl A. Nafzger (born August 29, 1941 in Plainview, Texas) is an American Hall of Fame horse trainer. Before he was involved in horseracing he was a championship Rodeo bullrider. Nafzger trained Unbridled who won the 1990 Kentucky Derby and Breeders' Cup Classic. In 1990 he was voted the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer and the Big Sport of Turfdom Award. In 1994, he wrote a book on the training of Thoroughbred horses titled Traits Of A Winner that was published by R. Meerdink Co. (ISBN 978-0929346328). In 1998, Nafzger trained Banshee Breeze who won that year's Eclipse Award for Outstanding 3-Year-Old Filly. In 2006 he was back in the national spotlight as the trainer of the colt Street Sense who won the 2006 Breeders' Cup Juvenile and the 2007 Kentucky Derby. Now in semi-retirement, Nafzger will only train for two clients, James B. Tafel, owner of Street Sense, and for Bentley Smith, who now has eight horses being trained by Nafzger. Smith's first wife (who died in 1999) was the daughter of Unbridled's owner, Frances A. Genter, and ran the Genter stable before its dissolution. Inducted to the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame in 2008
    5.33
    3 votes
    181

    Harry Giddings, Jr.

    Harry Giddings, Jr. (May 18, 1884 - June 15, 1949) was a Canadian owner, breeder, and trainer of thoroughbred racehorses. He was born in Trafalgar Township in Halton County, Ontario now at the outskirts of the city of Oakville. Raised on an equestrian farm, he learned about training horses from childhood and by 1907 was successful enough to have one of his horses compete in the Queen's Plate, Canada's most prestigious horse race first run in 1860. Giddings would win his first Queen's Plate in 1911 and from there went on to capture a total of eight, a record for a trainer that was tied by Roger Attfield on June 22, 2008. Harry Giddings, Jr. maintained a stud farm near Oakville, and owned four of his eight Queen's Plate winners. He trained horses for other owners and was active in the business until his death in 1949. Following its creation, Harry Giddings, Jr. was inducted posthumously in the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame in 1985.
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Barclay Tagg

    Barclay Tagg

    Barclay Tagg (born December 30, 1937 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) is an American thoroughbred horse trainer. A 1961 graduate of Pennsylvania State University with a degree in Animal Husbandry, he is best known for conditioning Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and Jockey Club Gold Cup winner Funny Cide. Horses in Tagg's stable have included Showing Up and Nobiz Like Shobiz. Barclay trains horses year round, spending spring in New York and winter in Florida. Formerly a steeplechase jockey, Tagg won his first race in 1972 at Old Liberty Park. He has been a journeyman trainer for many years, and with Funny Cide became the first trainer to win the Kentucky Derby in his first attempt since Cam Gambolati with Spend a Buck in 1985. Q - "You enabled a New York-bred gelding to transcend the Sport of Kings and infiltrate mainstream America like no other horse in the last 30 years." ---Steve Haskin A - "That's all I do. I don't play golf. I don't go bowling. I don't go to Disneyland. I just take good care of the horses and wait for something good to happen. It took me 30-some years but this lovely thing came along." ---Barclay Tagg on Funny Cide
    6.00
    2 votes
    184

    Bobby Frankel

    Robert Julian Frankel (July 9, 1941 – November 16, 2009) was an American thoroughbred race horse trainer whom ESPN called "one of the most successful and respected trainers in the history of thoroughbred racing." He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1995, and was a five-time winner of the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer. Often referred to as "Bobby" by others, he preferred and always used "Robert." Frankel set the single-season world record for most Grade/Group I victories in 2003 with 25 Grade I wins, a record he still holds. Early in his career in 1960s New York, Frankel assisted the prominent trainer Buddy Jacobson. On his own, Frankel saddled his first winner late in 1966 before struggling somewhat in 1967, when he won with just 9 of 101 starters. During 1968, however, he won 36 of 165 outings, his horses accumulating $167,000 in purse money. In the next few years, he continued to prosper in New York, and during the winter of 1970–1971, he had some success at the West Coast meeting at Santa Anita. After moving permanently to California in 1972, Frankel scored a series of wins that brought him to the attention of the horse betting world,
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    6.00
    2 votes
    186

    Horatio Luro

    Horatio A. Luro (February 27, 1901 - December 16, 1991) was a thoroughbred horse racing trainer in the United States. Born in Argentina into a wealthy family that had been involved with horses for several generations, a suave young Horatio Luro grew up as something of a playboy and maintained this lifestyle after moving to the United States. Well connected, he was friends with the social and business elite who could afford to be involved in the costly sport of thoroughbred racing. One of those elite was Canada's E. P. Taylor (1901–1989), chairman of a giant business conglomerate, the founder of the Jockey Club of Canada, and later the president of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association. Taylor hired Horatio Luro to run his Windfields Farm, a large breeding and racing operation with two farms in Ontario and another in Chesapeake City, Maryland. In a career that spanned 48 years from 1937 to 1984, Horatio Luro trained 43 Stakes winners and 3 Champions. He won the 1962 Kentucky Derby with California-bred Decidedly and two years later won both the Derby and the Preakness Stakes with Northern Dancer, a horse who would go on to be the 20th century's greatest sire. Luro also trained
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    MacKenzie Miller

    Mackenzie "Mack" Todd Miller (October 16, 1921 – December 11, 2010) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and owner/breeder. During his forty-six year career, he conditioned seventy-two stakes winners, including four Eclipse Award champions. Mack Miller grew up near the Keeneland Race Course, and attended its first race in 1936. He studied at the Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida then at the University of Kentucky but interrupted his education to serve with the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war's end, in 1947 he went to work as a stable hand for Calumet Farm. He became involved with conditioning horses, and took out his training license in 1949. Miller trained 1974 Epsom Derby winner Snow Knight who had been purchased by E. P. Taylor; Snow Knight was selected 1975's American Champion Male Turf Horse. Miller also trained for Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. He was then was hired by Paul Mellon for his Rokeby Stables. He and Mellon had their first Kentucky Derby win in 1993 with Sea Hero. Among their other successes, Winter's Tale won the 1980 Brooklyn Handicap, the Suburban Handicap, and the Marlboro Cup Invitational Handicap. In 1984, Fit to
    6.00
    2 votes
    188

    Marcus Tregoning

    Marcus Tregoning is a horse racing jockey who worked in an apprenticeship under Dick Hern. Tregoning began training horses by himself in the year 1997, originally starting with 50 horses.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Mesh Tenney

    Meshach A. "Mesh" Tenney (November 16, 1907 - November 6, 1993) was an American Thoroughbred horse trainer. From Arizona, Mesh Tenney began his career as a Thoroughbred trainer in the western United States in 1935. He won the Santa Anita Derby three times (1955, 1956, 1963) and was the leading money-winning trainer in the United States in 1962 and 1963. Mesh Tenney is best remembered as the trainer of Swaps who won the 1955 Kentucky Derby and the Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year in 1956. He also trained Candy Spots who won the 1963 Preakness Stakes and finished 2nd in both the Derby and the Belmont Stakes. During his 40 year career Mesh Tenney trained 36 stakes winners. In 1991, he was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Mesh Tenney died in Safford, Arizona in 1993.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190

    Steve Asmussen

    Steven Mark Asmussen (born November 18, 1965 in Gettysburg, South Dakota) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born into a horse racing family, his parents, Keith and Marilyn "Sis" Asmussen, are both trainers who operate El Primero Training Center off the Mines Road in Laredo, the seat of Webb County in south Texas. His older brother, Cash Asmussen, currently a trainer himself, is a retired Eclipse Award-winning jockey and a champion in Europe. Asmussen began racing at age sixteen as a jockey, competing at racetracks in New Mexico, California, and New York for three years until his height and weight ended his riding career. In 1986 he began training Thoroughbreds and American Quarter Horses in New Mexico. In 2002, he led all trainers in Thoroughbred flat racing with 407 wins then in 2004 set a new record for wins by a trainer with 555, surpassing the previous standard of 496 held since 1976 by Jack Van Berg. Steve Asmussen's colt, Curlin, finished third in the 2007 Kentucky Derby and beat out Derby-winner Street Sense to win the 2007 Preakness Stakes. Curlin finished second in the 2007 Belmont Stakes to filly Rags to Riches, and went on to take the Breeders' Cup Classic
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Frank Butters

    Frank Joseph Arthur Butters (1878–1957) was a racehorse trainer specialising in flat racing who trained in Austria, Italy and England in the first half of the 20th century. He trained for two of the most successful owner-breeders in British racing at the time, Lord Derby and HH Aga Khan III, and was British flat racing Champion Trainer on eight occasions. Frank Butters was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1878 while his father Joseph Butters was training racehorses there. He was educated in Britain but returned to Austria as an assistant to his father. He was interned in Austria during World War I and trained in Italy after the war. In 1926 he returned to Britain to start a four-year contract as Lord Derby's trainer at Stanley House stables in Newmarket in succession to George Lambton. He trained a number of Classic winners for the Earl and also trained for other owners, winning the Epsom Oaks in 1927 for the Earl of Durham. In 1930 Lord Derby terminated Butters' employment but he set up as a public trainer and when the Aga Khan split with Dick Dawson, Butters took over as his trainer. He trained for the Aga Khan until forced to retire after a serious bicycle accident in 1949. In that
    5.00
    3 votes
    192

    Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons

    James Edward ("Sunny Jim") Fitzsimmons (July 23, 1874 – March 11, 1966) was a thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Born in Sheepshead Bay in Brooklyn, New York, Fitzsimmons began his career in 1885 working at a racetrack as a stable boy. After nearly ten less-than-successful years as a thoroughbred jockey, he became too heavy for that job and took up the training of horses. He went on to have one of the most successful careers in racing history that spanned seventy years from 1894–1963 and produced 2,275 race wins. Known both as "Sunny Jim" and as "Mr. Fitz," he trained three Kentucky Derby winners, four Preakness Stakes winners, and six Belmont Stakes winners. Included were two U.S. Triple Crown champions, Gallant Fox in 1930 and Omaha in 1935. His total of thirteen Classic wins was tied by D. Wayne Lukas in 2000. Five times, Fitzsimmons was the season's top money-winning trainer. In 1923 Jim Fitzsimmons took over training at Belair Stud. Following the death of Belair's owner and the dispersal of its stock, Fitzsimmons continued to train for the Wheatley Stable where he conditioned Preakness winner and the 1957 American Horse of the Year Bold Ruler who sired Secretariat. In recognition
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    John Hyland

    John Hyland

    John Joseph Hyland, Jr (September 1, 1912 – October 15, 1998) was an admiral in the United States Navy who commanded the U.S. Pacific Fleet from 1967-1970. A naval aviator, he was a champion of the aircraft carrier. Hyland was born in 1912 in Philadelphia, the son of a naval officer. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1934 and completed naval aviation training in 1937. Posted to the Philippines, he was located there when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor to begin US involvement in World War II. He participated in the defense of the Philippines, and the subsequent Allied withdrawal to Australia, winning the Distinguished Flying Cross for rescuing a British airman in the Molucca Sea. He then became the personal pilot of Admiral Ernest King, then Chief of Naval Operations. Upon returning to the Pacific Theater in 1943, he took command of an air squadron based on the USS Intrepid. He participated in numerous operations, earning a Silver Star for leading a ground attack against the Japanese at Kure on March 19, 1945, and another Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal for other missions against the Japanese. After the war, he served stints as a test pilot, then took
    4.25
    4 votes
    194

    Alec Taylor, Jr.

    Alec Taylor, Jr. (1862–1943) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse trainer who followed in the footsteps of his highly successful father, Alec Taylor, Sr.. From his Manton Stud at Manton, Wiltshire, Alec Taylor trained a large number of very successful horses, winning most every major race in England. He claimed victory in twenty-one of the Classic Races and is the only trainer to ever win two British Triple Crown titles, doing it back-to-back in 1917 and 1918. Remaining as trainer until his retirement in 1927, in 1918 Taylor sold Manton to Joseph Watson, the Leeds soap magnate, winning the 1921 Epsom Oaks for him with Love in Idleness and the Grand Prix de Paris the same year with Lemonora, which came 3rd. in that year's Derby. Watson was elevated to the peerage in 1922 taking the title Baron Manton. Twelve times Taylor earned British flat racing Champion Trainer honors as the year's leader in earnings including seven in a row between 1917 and 1923. Beyond his Classic winners, Taylor also trained Buchan, Picaroon, and Sceptre, amongst others. 2,000 Guineas 1,000 Guineas Epsom Derby Epsom Oaks St. Leger Stakes
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Bob Baffert

    Bob Baffert

    Robert A. "Bob" Baffert (born January 13, 1953 in Nogales, Arizona) is an American horse owner and trainer, whose horses have won three Kentucky Derbies, five Preakness Stakes, one Belmont Stakes and two Kentucky Oaks. He graduated from the University of Arizona's Race Track Industry Program with a Bachelor of Science degree. Bob Baffert began his career as a jockey. As he grew bigger, he had difficulty maintaining the required jockey weight, (around 100-108 pounds), and he switched to the training of American Quarter Horses. In 1991, he began devoting himself to conditioning Thoroughbreds for flat racing. From a base in California, he became the United States' leading money-winning trainer four times. He got his first big break in 1992, when he won his first Breeder's Cup race with Thirty Slews. In 1996, Baffert finished second in the Kentucky Derby by a nose with Cavonnier to Derby winner Grindstone. He came back the next year and won his first Kentucky Derby in 1997 with the gray colt Silver Charm. The horse also gave Baffert his first Preakness Stakes win, the second jewel of the Triple Crown. Silver Charm went on to place second in the Belmont Stakes and claim the first of
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Bud Delp

    Grover Greer "Bud" Delp (September 7, 1932 - December 29, 2006) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred racehorse trainer best remembered for his conditioning of Hall of Fame colt, Spectacular Bid. Bud Delp began his career as a Thoroughbred trainer in 1962 and in 1980 was voted the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer. Delp, along with John J. Tammaro, Jr., King T. Leatherbury and Richard E. Dutrow, Sr. were known as Maryland racing's "Big Four" who dominated racing in that state during the 1960s and '70s and who helped modernize flat racing training. During his career, Bud Delp's horses won 3,674 races and earned purses totaling nearly $41 million. In 2002, an honor he said he was most proud of, Delp was inducted into the United States' National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Delp remained a lifelong resident of Maryland and died in 2006 at his home in Ellicott City, aged 74.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    D. Wayne Lukas

    Darrell Wayne Lukas (born September 2, 1935 in Antigo, Wisconsin) is a former educator who became one of the most successful horse trainers in American Thoroughbred horse racing history and a U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee. Lukas graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison with a master's degree in education then taught high school where for nine years he was a head basketball coach. Born and raised on a small farm, D. Wayne Lukas grew up with an interest in horses. He began training quarter horses in California in 1968 and after ten years of considerable achievement that saw him train 24 world champions, he switched to training thoroughbred race horses. The first trainer to earn more than $100 million in purse money, he has been the year's top money winner 14 times. Lukas got his big break in 1980 when he won the Preakness Stakes on Codex. His horses have won the Kentucky Derby four times, the Preakness Stakes on five occasions, and have claimed victory four times in the Belmont Stakes, including winning all three of the Classics in 1995 with Thunder Gulch (Kentucky Derby, Belmont Stakes) and Timber Country (Preakness), making him the first trainer to sweep the Triple
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    George M. Odom

    George M. Odom

    George Martin Odom (July 8, 1882 - July 29, 1964) was an American National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame jockey and trainer in Thoroughbred horse racing. He is only one of two people to ever have won the Belmont Stakes as both a jockey and a trainer. A native of Columbus, Georgia, at age fourteen George Odom galloped horses for future Hall of Fame trainer, William P. Burch. He began riding professionally at age fifteen and in 1899 at age sixteen, won his first race. He quickly made such an impression that an April 10, 1899 article in the Chicago Daily Tribune referred to him as another Tod Sloan. In June 1899, the eighty-seven-pound Odom, who was an early advocate of the short-stirrup riding manner used today, signed a contract to ride for W. C. Whitney for a salary of $10,000 a year with additional compensation on a sliding scale for winning and finishing in the money. He rode at tracks in New York, New Orleans and the Benning Race Track in Washington, D.C.. Among his major wins as a jockey, Odom rode Banastar to victory in the 1901 Metropolitan Handicap and won the Woodlawn Vase trophy on three occasions. The best known of his mounts was future Hall of Fame inductee,
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    Jonathan E. Pease

    Jonathan Edward Pease (born June 8, 1952 in Northumberland, England) is a member of the area's prominent Pease family and a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. The son of Derrick Allix Pease and the Hon. Rosemary Portman, his grandfather was Sir Richard Arthur Pease, 2nd Baronet of the Pease Baronets, of Hammersknott. After studying at Eton College and Cambridge University, Jonathan Pease began learning the business of conditioning Thoroughbreds for racing in England under the tutelage of Toby Balding and Clive Brittain. He relocated to the United States where he worked for U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer, MacKenzie Miller and in Australia learned under legendary trainer and Australian Racing Hall of Fame inductee, T. J. Smith. In 1976 he went to work for French trainer, Francois Mathet and in 1979 took up permanent residence in France where he obtained his trainers license and set up a public stable at the renowned training facility at Chantilly Racecourse. Among his clients, Pease has conditioned horses in France for British stable owner Gerald W. Leigh and the Niarchos family. In 2004 he won France's most prestigious race, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. As well, he has trained for
    5.50
    2 votes
    200

    Katsuhiko Sumii

    Katsuhiko Sumii (角居 勝彦, Sumii Katsuhiko) (born March 28, 1964, Kanazawa, Ishikawa) is a Japanese horse trainer. He trained the first and second placing horses in the 2006 Melbourne Cup, Delta Blues and Pop Rock.
    5.50
    2 votes
    201

    Kiaran McLaughlin

    Kiaran P. McLaughlin (born November 15, 1960 in Lexington, Kentucky) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He currently has a blog website, at http://kiaranmclaughlin.com where he updates what horses he has racing for that particular day. He was born in an area of the country where horse racing and breeding is preeminent, McLaughlin was a student at the University of Kentucky when he decided to give up his studies and pursue a career in the Thoroughbred horse racing industry. He spent close to three years as an assistant for various trainers before going to work for U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer, D. Wayne Lukas in 1985. In 1992 he became the agent for jockey Chris Antley, a job he held until November 1993 when he signed on as the trainer for Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum in Dubai. In 1998, Kiaran McLaughlin was diagnosed with Multiple sclerosis and is required to take daily injections to suppress the disease. For ten years, Kiaran McLaughlin spent half of each year working in Dubai and half in the New York city area. In both locations he trained horses for Sheik Mohammed and his brother, Sheik Hamdan. He was the leading trainer at Dubai's Nad Al Sheba Racecourse
    5.50
    2 votes
    202

    Fulke Walwyn

    Fulke Thomas Tyndall Walwyn (1910-1991) was a British jockey and racehorse trainer specialising mainly in National Hunt racing. He was born in Wrexham and died in Newbury. He was educated at Malvern College. As a jockey his most notable victory came as an amateur rider on Reynoldstown in the 1936 Grand National. Forced by injury to retire from riding, he became one of the most successful National Hunt trainers of all time. He trained the winners of four Cheltenham Gold Cups, two Champion Hurdles. five King George VI Chases, seven Whitbread Gold Cups, seven Hennessy Gold Cups and a Grand National in 1964 with Team Spirit. He was British jump racing Champion Trainer five times. He trained 40 winners at the Cheltenham Festival between 1946 and 1986, a record which stood until beaten by Nicky Henderson in 2012, and he is commemorated in the title of the Fulke Walwyn Kim Muir Challenge Cup at the Festival. Amongst his notable owners were the Queen Mother and Dorothy Paget. As well as his many National Hunt victories, he trained Dorothy Paget's Aldborough to win the Doncaster Cup and Queen Alexandra Stakes on the Flat. Walwyn became a household name when, in 1964, his Cheltenham Gold Cup
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    John A. Nerud

    John A. Nerud (born February 9, 1913) is an American thoroughbred horse trainer and owner who was inducted in the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1972. Nerud, who was born on a ranch in Minatare, Nebraska, worked as a rodeo cowboy, groom and most notably as a trainer during his youth. Prior to serving in World War II, he was the agent for Hall of Fame jockey Ted Atkinson in New England. He served with the United States Navy during the war, then returned to racing as an assistant to Frank J. Kearns at Woolford Farm. He eventually took over from Kearns and in 1949 trained his first Champion when Delegate earned American Co-Champion Sprint Horse honors. Nerud spent the bulk of his 44-year training career (1935–1978) as a trainer, president and general manager for William L. McKnight's Tartan Farms in Ocala, Florida. When Nerud retired from training in 1978, he remained at Tartan as manager of racing and breeding. As a trainer, Nerud first drew national attention in 1956 after prepping Switch On to win the Palm Beach and McLennan Handicaps. The following season, in 1957, Nerud lost the Kentucky Derby by a nose to Iron Liege after jockey Bill Shoemaker, aboard Gallant Man,
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    John C. Kimmel

    John C. Kimmel (born June 25, 1954 in East Orange, New Jersey) is an American thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He holds a pre-med undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School in 1980.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    Sylvester Veitch

    Sylvester E. Veitch (February 24, 1910 - February 14, 1996) was a Hall of Fame thoroughbred horse trainer. Veitch began his career in racing as a jockey and trainer in Steeplechase racing. In 1939 he moved to flat racing when he began employment as a trainer with Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney in Kentucky. He won two Belmont Stakes while in Whitney's employment: one in 1947 with Phalanx and the second in 1951 with Counterpoint. In 1958 he left his position with C.V. Whitney and began employment with George D. Widener, Jr. where he trained What a Treat, and many other notable horses. In 1971, after Mr. Widener's death, Sylvester Veitch opened his own public stable. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1977. Among his accomplishments, Sylvester Veitch held the single-season mark of 24 wins in 24 days set in 1954 at Saratoga Race Course, a record that held until 2003. In the course of his career he had forty-four stakes winners. He trained 5 champions in all: First Flight in 1946, Phalanx in 1947, Counterpoint in 1951, Career Boy in 1956, and What a Treat in 1965. Mr. Veitch died at the age of 85 at the Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, Long Island, New
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    206

    Tim Ritchey

    Timothy F. "Tim" Ritchey (born May 21, 1951 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He is best known as the trainer of Afleet Alex, a 2005 winner of two American Classic Races, the Preakness and Belmont Stakes. Tim Ritchey married Janet Wood, a native of England. The couple have two sons, Christopher and Benjamin, who were born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania.
    6.00
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    207

    Gordon J. McCann

    Gordon J. "Pete" McCann (1908 – January 18, 2000) was a Canadian Thoroughbred horse trainer. He was born in East York, now part of the city of Toronto. Known to his family as Gordon, in racing circles he was nicknamed Pete. Pete McCann began his career as a jockey. He raced at Oriental Park Racetrack in Havana, Cuba where he was a leading jockey in 1926. He rode with success in Toronto then in 1940 took out his trainer's license and won his first King's Plate that same year with Willie the Kid. McCann was hired by E. P. Taylor as head trainer at Windfields Farm in 1950 where he would spend the next twenty-one years. During his training career, McCann conditioned seven Canadian Hall of Fame horses and six horses that won Canadian Horse of the Year honors including Canadian Triple Crown winners New Providence in 1959 and Canebora in 1963. He also trained six winners of Canada's most prestigious race, the Queen's Plate and overall won seventeen races that now comprise the Canadian Classics. He also is tied for having trained the most winners with three in the Canadian International Stakes. In 1971, McCann retired from training after Taylor divided the stable into Canadian and United
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    208

    Neil J. Howard

    Neil J. Howard (February 23, 1949 in Riverdale, Bronx, New York) is an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer. Howard began working for a racing stable in 1969 and went on to spend seven years as an assistant and stable foreman to future Hall of Fame trainer MacKenzie Miller before going out on his own in 1979. With Summer Squall, in 1990 Neil Howard won the second leg of the U.S. Triple Crown series, the Preakness Stakes and in 2003 trained Mineshaft to American Horse of the Year honors.
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    2 votes
    209

    Pete Bostwick

    George Herbert "Pete" Bostwick (August 14, 1909 - January 13, 1982) was an American court tennis player, a steeplechase jockey and horse trainer, and an eight-goal polo player. He was born in Bisby Lake, New York to Mary L. Stokes and Albert Carlton Bostwick. His grandfather, Jabez A. Bostwick, was a founder and treasurer of the Standard Oil Company of New York and a partner of John D. Rockefeller. His grandmother, Helen C. Bostwick, left upon her death in April 1920 a sum of $1,156,818 to him and similar amounts to his siblings. Among his cousins were the cross-dressing woman speedboat racer "Joe" a/k/a Betty Carstairs and the pilot Francis Francis. Pete Bostwick's inherited wealth afforded him the opportunity to pursue a number of sporting interests. His father was a horseman and polo player and Pete Bostwick become one of a leading steeplechase owners, trainers, and riders. Pete Bostwick was a member of The Jockey Club and a patron of the National Tennis Club. He rode Thoroughbred steeplechase horses from 1927 to 1949 both in the US and Grand National in the UK and also rode in flat racing. In flat racing he finished 4th in the 1928 running of the Belmont Stakes aboard Whisk
    5.00
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    210

    Charlie Whittingham

    Charles Edward Whittingham (April 13, 1913 - April 20, 1999) was an American thoroughbred race horse trainer who is one of the most acclaimed trainers in U.S. racing history. Born in Chula Vista, California, Whittingham began working around race horses at a young age and was eventually taken on as an assistant by Hall of Fame trainer Horatio Luro. During World War II, his career was interrupted by service with the United States Marine Corps. At war's end, he returned as an assistant trainer until 1950 when he set up his own stable to take on the training of horses for various owners. He got his big break when Liz Whitney Tippett hired him to condition her Llangollen Farm racing stable. In 1953, Whittingham trained his first Champion when Llangollen's Porterhouse earned U.S. Two-Year-Old colt honors. Over his forty-nine years as a head trainer, Whittingham had 252 stakes wins and became the all-time leading trainer at both Hollywood Park Racetrack and Santa Anita Park. He won the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer in the U.S. in 1971, 1982 and 1989 and U.S. Champion Trainer by earnings seven times: 1970 to 1973, 1975, 1981, and 1982. Whittingham trained several champions
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    211

    Mark Prescott

    Sir Mark Prescott, 3rd Baronet (b. 1948) is a race horse trainer with over 1300 winners to his name. An English baronet he inherited his knighthood from his father and obtained his first trainers license in 1970. The son of a theatre and art critic for Punch magazine, the young Prescott broke his back in a riding accident in 1965 resulting in a 9 month stay at Oswestry Orthopedic Hospital. On 1 September 2009 Prescott and television cook Clarissa Dickson-Wright received an absolute discharge from Scarborough Magistrates Court after pleading guilty to hare coursing whilst attending an event organized by Yorkshire Greyhound Field Trialling Club in March 2007. Sir Mark trains at the Newmarket yard, Heath House (which traces back to Tregonwell Frampton, England's first professional race horse trainer). He took over running the yard in 1970 on the retirement of Jack Waugh, to whom Sir Mark was assistant. Sir Mark is well known and hugely respected as a patient trainer, whose horses are given time and not rushed. Sir Mark is also a famously skilled 'placer' of horses, choosing horse's races very carefully. He formerly had a decades-long association with veteran jockey George Duffield -
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    212
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    213

    Warren A. Croll, Jr.

    Warren A. "Jimmy" Croll, Jr. (March 9, 1920 – June 6, 2008) was an American Hall of Fame Thoroughbred race horse trainer. Croll was born in 1920 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. After finishing high school, he attended the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming a veterinarian but left to pursue his passion for racing Thoroughbreds. In 1940 he obtained his trainers' license but his racing career was interrupted by service with the United States Army in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II. Upon the 1946 opening of the new Monmouth Park Racetrack in Oceanport, New Jersey, Croll relocated there and became a permanent part of that facility's annual summer campaign. In 1998, he received Monmouth Park's "Raines Distinguished Achievement Award" given in memory of trainer Virgil W. Raines to an owner or trainer who has shown a dedication to the sport of Thoroughbred racing through exemplary conduct demonstrating professionalism and integrity. Best known as "Jimmy" Croll, he earned his first graded stakes race win with War Phar in 1951. Although Croll has had a number of good horses, there are several that stand out: Jimmy Croll conditioned horses for Rachel
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    214
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    216
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    217

    Saeed bin Suroor

    Saeed bin Suroor (born October 10, 1966, Dubai), is a horse racing trainer. Formerly a policeman, he took out his training license in 1994 and the following year was appointed as the trainer for Sheikh Mohammed's Godolphin operation. He has been British Champion Trainer on four occasions. Great Britain Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Ireland Italy Japan Singapore United Arab Emirates United States
    5.00
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    218

    Horace A. Jones

    Horace A. "Jimmy" Jones (November 24, 1906 – September 2, 2001) was an American thoroughbred horse trainer. The son of Hall of Fame horse trainer Ben A. Jones, Jimmy Jones was born in Parnell, Missouri. Raised around horses from infancy, he learned the art of training from his father while working with him at Woolford Farm in Prairie Village, Kansas from 1931 to 1939, after which his father signed on as the head trainer at Calumet Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. There, Jimmy worked as his father's assistant but his career was interrupted when he joined the United States military during World War II. At war's end, he returned to training horses and in 1948 took over the head trainer duties from his father, who was appointed Calumet Farm's general manager. In 1948, Jimmy Jones stepped aside as the trainer of record for Citation to allow his father to be officially designated as the trainer for the Kentucky Derby. Ben Jones wanted the opportunity to equal the record of Herbert J. "Derby Dick" Thompson, who had trained four Derby winners. Citation won the race. Ben Jones later returned to training and won the Derby two more times. Jimmy Jones was named Citation's trainer for the Preakness
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    219

    Melvin F. Stute

    Melvin Frederick "Mel" Stute (born August 8, 1927, in Fort Wayne, Indiana) is an American trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. On December 11, 2010, at Hollywood Park Racetrack , he won the 2000th race of a career that includes a win in the second leg of the U.S. Triple Crown series, the Preakness Stakes in 1986, the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies that same year, and the 1987 Breeders' Cup Sprint. Stute is the younger brother of trainer Warren Stute (1921–2007). His family moved to California in 1934 when Mel was seven years old. In his teens, Stute worked as a groom at Santa Anita Racetrack before winning his first race as a trainer in 1947 at Portland Meadows Racetrack in Portland, Oregon. Since then he has won twelve training titles at various California tracks of which six were at Fairplex Park Racetrack, where he is the all-time leader in races won. In 1986, Stute trained two Champions. One was Snow Chief, with whom he won the Santa Anita Derby and Preakness Stakes, and was voted American Champion Three-Year-Old Male Horse. The other was Brave Raj, the American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly who won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies. Stute bred and trained Telly's Pop. The
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    220

    André Fabre

    André Fabre (born 9 December 1945) is a French thoroughbred horse racing trainer. The son of a diplomat, Fabre graduated from university with a law degree but then decided to pursue a career in thoroughbred horse racing. He began by working in the stables as a groom then as a schooling rider. He became France's leading jump jockey, winning more than two hundred and fifty races including the Grand Steeple-Chase de Paris. When he turned to training horses, Fabre proved even more successful, first with jump horses then with flat racers. He has been the champion trainer in France for nineteen straight years and is one of the most successful trainers in the world, winning across Europe and North America including four Breeders' Cup races. Among the many champions Fabre has trained are Trempolino, Peintre Celebre, and two horses ranked No. 1 in the world, Hurricane Run (2005) and Manduro (2007). Fabre fulfilled a lifelong ambition by finally winning the Epsom Derby in 2011 with Pour Moi France Canada Germany Great Britain Ireland Italy United Arab Emirates United States
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    221

    Ben A. Jones

    Benjamin Allyn Jones (December 31, 1882 - June 13, 1961) was a thoroughbred horse trainer. Ben Jones was born in Parnell, Missouri, and attended Wentworth Military Academy in Lexington, Missouri for high school. Jones went into the business of breeding and training of thoroughbreds during the first decade of the 20th century, racing his horses on small circuits in the American West and in Mexico. By the end of the 1920s he was recognized as one of the better trainers in the industry. He gave up his operation to accept the job of trainer for Woolford Farm in Prairie Village, Kansas from 1931 to 1939 during which time he trained three champions including the 1938 Flamingo Stakes and Kentucky Derby winner, "Lawrin." For the next season, Jones was hired by Warren Wright, Sr. to train for his Calumet Farm in Lexington, Kentucky and to take charge of its breeding operation. Under Ben Jones, Calumet became one of the greatest stables in thoroughbred racing history. He is the only trainer to win the Kentucky Derby six times, including victories by two U.S. Triple Crown winners, Whirlaway and Citation. In 1948, Ben Jones was appointed general manager of Calumet Farm and his son, Horace A.
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    222

    Dermot Weld

    Dermot K. Weld (born 29 July 1948) is one of Ireland's most successful racehorse trainers. He holds the record for the most winners trained in Ireland (2,578 set in August 2000). A qualified veterinarian and former jockey, Weld maintains his stable, Rosewell House, in Curragh, Ireland. He is married, with two sons. Irish bookmakers, Paddy Power, tried to launch a campaign to change the name of the world famous Galway Races to the Dermot Weld Retirement Fund Races, however it proved to be unsuccessful. He was played by Brendan Gleeson in the feature film The Cup. Ireland Australia France Germany Great Britain Hong Kong Italy United States
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    223

    H. Allen Jerkens

    Harry Allen Jerkens (born April 21, 1929 in Islip, Long Island, New York) is an American Thoroughbred race horse Hall of Fame trainer. Jerkens' father owned a riding academy on Long Island that led to his interest in horse racing and in 1950 he trained his first winner. Sometimes called the "Giant Killer", he is best known for his upsets. Jerkins saddled 1973 Whitney Handicap winner Onion (defeating Secretariat), 1973 Woodward Stakes and Jockey Club Gold Cup winner Prove Out (defeating Secretariat and Riva Ridge, respectively), and Beau Purple, who defeated Kelso in 3 of their four meetings. In addition his horses have defeated other greats such as Buckpasser, Cougar II, and Forego. In 1973, H. Allen Jerkens was voted the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer and in 1975 he became the youngest trainer ever inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame at the age of 45. Still active, he has trained more than 160 stakes winners including Duck Dance and Tunex. His son Jimmy followed in his footsteps and is also a successful trainer.
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    224

    James Fanshawe

    James Fanshawe is a British racehorse trainer. He principally trains flat horses such as multiple Group 1 winner Soviet Song. However, he has twice won the Champion Hurdle in 1992 with Royal Gait (previously a disqualified winner of the Ascot Gold Cup and ten years later with Hors La Loi III. Fanshawe has also won at the Cheltenham and Aintree festivals with the J.P. McManus owned Reveillez. He trains at Pegasus Stables in Newmarket. Great Britain France Ireland Canada
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    225

    Noel Murless

    Sir Charles Francis Noel Murless (known as Noel) (24 March 1910 – 9 May 1987) began his career as a racehorse trainer in 1935 at Hambleton Lodge in Yorkshire before moving to Hambleton House after the war, at one time sharing premises with Ryan Price. In 1947, he moved south, first to Beckhampton, Wiltshire (where he was champion trainer in his first season) and then onto Warren Place, Newmarket (where his one-time son-in-law Henry Cecil still trains). He retired in 1976 and was knighted the following year. Over the years Sir Noel enjoyed nineteen classic wins in England and two in Ireland. Of these there were three Epsom Derby wins, with Crepello (1957), St. Paddy (1960) and Royal Palace (1967). Like his Warren Place successor, he also had an outstanding record in the Epsom Oaks, saddling no less than five winners: Carrozza (1957), Petite Etoile (1959), Lupe (1970), Altesse Royale (1971) and Mysterious (1973). His greatest horse was Royal Palace who preceded his Derby success by winning the 2,000 Guineas, to which he added the Eclipse and the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes the following year. Fitzgeorge-Parker, Tim (December 1980). Guv'Nor: A Biography of Sir Noel
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    226

    Roger Laurin

    Roger Laurin (born 1936 in Montreal, Quebec) is a trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses in the United States and Canada. He has trained Champions Numbered Account, the 1971 American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly, and Chief's Crown, the 1984 American Champion Two-Year-Old Colt and Breeders' Cup Juvenile winner. Roger Laurin grew up in the Thoroughbred racing business as the son of U.S. Racing Hall of Fame trainer Lucien Laurin. Roger Laurin came into prominence in 1964 when he took charge of the race conditioning of a filly name Miss Cavandish. Purchased by Harry S. Nichols for just $1,500 because she had a severe "toeing in" problem, under Roger Laurin Miss Cavandish became one of the top two fillies racing in the United States in 1964, finishing second in the balloting for 1964 American Champion 3-Year-Old Filly honors behind future U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee, Tosmah. By 1966, Roger Laurin was training for major owners such as Harry Guggenheim's Cain Hoy Stable and then for Penny Chenery's Meadow Stable. In 1971 Roger Laurin was offered the job as head trainer for Ogden Phipps, a major stable owner and part of the Phipps family, one of America's most prominent racing families.
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    227
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    228

    William B. Finnegan

    William B. "Bill" Finnegan (September 19, 1890 - October 18, 1970) was an American Thoroughbred horse racing trainer. A native of New York City, Finnegan spent more than fifty years as a trainer primarily on the West Coast of the United States. During his career he conditioned horses for major stable owners such as Vera S. Bragg, movie mogul Louis B. Mayer, Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., Edward S. Moore's Circle M Ranch stable, George A. Pope, Jr.'s El Peco Ranch, and Neil S. McCarthy who would name one of his horses in his honor. Following its opening in December 1929, Finnegan was racing at Agua Caliente Racetrack in Tijuana, Mexico. Racing in California, where he would make his home in Arcadia near Santa Anita Park, Finnegan won the 1939 Hollywood Derby with Shining One who equalled the Hollywood Park track record. In 1940, he took over as the trainer of Big Pebble after the four-year-old was purchased by client, Edward S. Moore. Raced by his former owner at age two and three, Big Pebble showed little and had even been used as a lead pony. Under Finnegan in 1941, Big Pebble blossomed into the best older horse in the United States. Enroute to being named American Champion Older Male
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    229

    Criquette Head-Maarek

    Christiane "Criquette" Head (born 6 November 1948 at Marly-le-Roi, near Maisons-Laffitte, France) is considered to be the leading female racehorse trainer in the world. Known as Criquette, she was born into the Thoroughbred horse racing business. Her great grandfather was a jockey-turned-trainer as was her grandfather William Head who was a very successful jockey, trainer, and owner in both flat racing and steeplechase events. Her father, Alec Head, became a successful trainer and breeder and the owner of Haras du Quesnay near Deauville. The eldest of three daughters, her brother Freddy Head was the champion jockey six times in France who now trains horses, and sister Martine oversees the operations at Haras du Quesnay. In her teens, Criquette Head studied for three years in the United Kingdom at schools in Guildford in Surrey and Eastbourne in East Sussex. She started riding ponies as a child then at age 18 began competing as a rider. Trilingual (French, English and Spanish), she lived in Spain for several years before returning home in 1974 where she worked in a brokerage firm but decided on a career in racing. She began as an assistant trainer for her father and in 1978 obtained
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    230

    David Hofmans

    David E. Hofmans (born January 27, 1943, in Los Angeles, California) is an American trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. Born and raised in Los Angeles, as a boy his father brought him to watch horse racing at area tracks. While a student at Pasadena City College he became friends with Gary Jones. The son of a horse trainer and future trainer himself, Jones spurred Hofmans' interest in horses and he would begin learning the business as a groom and hot walker for Jones' father. As a professional trainer, Hofmans earned his first win in 1974 at Santa Anita Racetrack. After success on California race tracks, in 1996 he gained national attention as the trainer of Alphabet Soup who defeated the great Cigar in the Breeders' Cup Classic. Training for prominent horseman and Magna Entertainment Corp. Chairman, Frank Stronach, in 1997 Hofmans won Canada's most presigious race, the Queen's Plate, with Awesome Again and won the Belmont Stakes that saw his colt Touch Gold end Silver Charm's bid for the U.S.Triple Crown. Hofmans won his second Breeders' Cup race in 2003 when Adoration captured the Breeders' Cup Distaff and his third with Desert Code's victory in the 2008 Breeders' Cup Turf
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    231

    David O'Brien

    David O'Brien is an Irish former racehorse trainer. He was the son of highly successful trainer Vincent O'Brien. His primary successes included Assert who won the 1982 Irish and French Derbys and Secreto who won the 1984 Epsom Derby, defeating El Gran Senor trained by his father Vincent, making David O'Brien the youngest trainer to win the race. He retired from training in the late 1980s and moved to France where he purchased a vineyard, Chateau Vignelaure , where he immersed himself in the production and distribution of what is now considered to be a world class wine. In 2009, David and his family decided to move to Australia, where his wife Catherine and mother Jacqueline had both grown up. They now reside in Dakeith, Perth, with their 2 youngest children. Their 3rd son, Charles O'Brien, recently graduated from Boston College with majors in Economics and Philosophy.
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    232
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    233

    Elie Lellouche

    Elie Lellouche (born March 5, 1952 in Tunis) is a French trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses and jockeys. After having modest success as a jockey, in 1979 Lellouche obtained his horse trainer's license. He had reasonable achievements and built a reputation good enough that in the 1990s the prominent Wildenstein Stables shifted forty-two of their horses from André Fabre to Lellouche's care. The move brought considerable success and raised his reputation even further that helped attract other owners to bring quality horses to his training facilities at Chantilly. For Spanish owner/breeder Enrique Sarasola, Lellouche trained Helissio, the 1996 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe winner. More recently, the Wildenstein Stable's colt, Westerner, became the first French-trained winner of Britain's Ascot Gold Cup in almost thirty years and was voted the Cartier Racing Award as Europe's Top Stayer in 2004 and 2005. Lellouche is also known for coaching successful French jockey Dominique Boeuf. France Great Britain Hong Kong Italy
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    234

    Eoin G. Harty

    Eoin G. Harty (born November 23, 1962 in Dublin, Ireland) is a Thoroughbred racehorse trainer in the United States. From a family of horsemen, Eoin (pronounced Owen) Harty is the fourth generation to be involved in racing. At age sixteen he went to work at the Irish National Stud then a year later moved to the United States, working in the business in California where he still makes his home. Harty worked for notable stables such as that of Allen E. Paulson and eventually became an assistant to trainers John Russell and then Bob Baffert. In 2000, he took charge of the training of two-year-olds for the North American division of Sheikh Mohammed's Godolphin Racing. In 2001, Eoin Harty got his big break as he conditioned Godolphin's Tempera who won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies and earned American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly honors. In 2007, Eoin Harty began conditioning horses for WinStar Farm and has met with considerable success, notably winning the 2008 Travers Stakes with Colonel John and the 2009 Dubai World Cup with Well Armed.
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    235

    François Boutin

    François Boutin (January 21, 1937 - February 1, 1995) was a French Thoroughbred horse trainer. The son of a farmer, he was born in the village of Beaunay in the northerly Seine Maritime département. He began riding horses at a young age and competed in show jumping and cross-country equestrianism. He began his professional racing career driving horses in harness racing then after serving as a flat racing apprentice, obtained his license as a trainer in 1964. François Boutin was the trainer for the stables of Jean-Luc Lagardère and for the Stavros Niarchos family. During his more than thirty year career he was the leading money winner in France seven times (1976, 1978–81, 1983–84). Although victory eluded him in France's most prestigious horse race, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, Boutin won the Poule d'Essai des Poulains on six occasions and most every other important race in the country multiple times. Racing outside of France, Boutin's horse Sagaro was the first to win England's Ascot Gold Cup three years in a row. As well, Boutin-trained horses won the 1982 English 2,000 Guineas, the 1987 1,000 Guineas and the Matron Stakes in Ireland (Nureyev, ridden by stable jockey Philippe
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    236

    Frank L. Brothers

    Frank L. Brothers (born October 24, 1946 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer who in 1991 won two of the three U.S. Triple Crown races. He was voted the Outstanding Thoroughbred Trainer Award from the United Thoroughbred Trainers of America in 1991 and was inducted into the Fair Grounds Racing Hall of Fame. A resident of Louisville, Kentucky, Frank Brothers is married to former jockey and television racing analyst, Donna Barton.
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    237
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    238
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    239
    James Rowe, Sr.

    James Rowe, Sr.

    James Gordon Rowe, Sr. (1857 - August 2, 1929) was an American jockey and horse trainer elected to the Hall of Fame for Thoroughbred Horse racing. He won the Belmont Stakes twice as a jockey and won it eight times as a trainer. He had 34 champion horses to his credit, more than any other trainer in the Hall of Fame. Rowe was born in the environs of Richmond, Virginia, and went to work at a racetrack as a boy of ten. He went from apprentice rider to being considered the leading jockey in the U.S. at age 14, a position he kept from 1871 to 1873. With age came weight, and in 1875, at the age of 18, Rowe retired from racing as a jockey. He began working for the Davis & Hall racing stable as an assistant to the trainer, David W. McConn. Rowe eventually became head trainer for the stable. In 1879, Rowe joined the Dwyer Brothers Stable. On May 17, 1881, with the future Hall of Fame horse Hindoo, he became the youngest trainer to win the Kentucky Derby. Hindoo won eighteen straight races that year. The Dwyers pushed their horses hard, in a manner that would be unacceptable and illegal today. Rowe quit the Dwyers in 1885 in a dispute regarding over-racing their horses, especially the mare
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    240

    Jerry Hollendorfer

    Jerry Hollendorfer (born June 18, 1946 in Akron, Ohio) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse owner and trainer. He has the most wins in the history of Northern California race horse trainers. Hollendorfer currently lives in Redwood City, California with his wife, Janet. In May 2011, he was inducted into the US Racing Hall of Fame.
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    241
    John E. Madden

    John E. Madden

    John Edward Madden (1856–1929) was a prominent AmericanThoroughbred and Standardbred owner, breeder and trainer in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. He owned Hamburg Place Stud in Lexington, Kentucky and bred five Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes winners. He was inducted into the National Racing Hall of Fame posthumously in 1983. He was also inducted into the Harness Racing Hall of Fame for his contributions to the sport as a trainer, breeder and owner. He is the only person to be inducted into both the Harness and Thoroughbred Halls of Fame. He was also a businessman, who invested in corn refining. John E. Madden was born on December 28, 1856 in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to Patrick and Catherine (McKee) Madden, who were Irish immigrants from Roscommon. Madden's father died in 1860, which resulted in hardship for the family. Young Madden often had to rely on his wits and athleticism to survive. He worked for four years in the local steel mills as a teenager and often fought in prizefighting as a young man to earn money. Boasting an athletic build, at nearly six feet tall and weighing 180 pounds, Madden excelled in baseball, running and broadjumping. By the age of 16,
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    242

    John Oxx

    John M. Oxx (born 14 July 1950 in Ireland) is a trainer of Thoroughbred racehorses. His stables are located on "The Curragh" of Kildare, the stables are named Currabeg Stables. His father, John Oxx Sr., was also a very successful trainer who won eight Irish classics and it was the younger Oxx's ambition to follow in his father's footsteps. He qualified as a veterinarian, graduating from University College Dublin and has been training since 1979, when he received his training license. He currently resides in County Kildare, Ireland and trains out of Currabeg Stables. His family includes his wife and three children. He is best known for Sea The Stars who he meticulously trained to land six Group 1 wins in six months in England, Ireland and France in the 2009 season. Ireland Canada Great Britain France Germany United States Ridgewood Pearl 1995 Irish 1000 Guineas, Coronation Stakes, Prix Du Moulin and Breeders Cup Mile Turf Timarida 1995 & 1996 Matron Stakes, Prix De L’Opera, EP Taylor Stakes, Bayerisches Zuchtrennen, Beverly D. Stakes and Irish Champion Stakes Sinndar 1999 & 2000 National Stakes, Epsom Derby, Irish Derby and Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe Alamshar 2003 Irish Derby
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    243

    John Shirreffs

    John A. Shirreffs (born June 1, 1945 in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer. Based in California, Vietnam War veteran John Shirreffs began training Thoroughbreds in 1978. He has won a number of stakes races with his most important coming in the 2005 Kentucky Derby when Giacomo scored a major upset. In 2007, another Shirreffs-trained horse scored a major upset when Tiago, a half-brother to Giacomo (both out of the mare Set Them Free) won the Santa Anita Derby. He is also the trainer of champion Zenyatta, beaten only once in twenty career starts, and winner of the Breeders' Cup Ladies' Classic in 2008 and Breeders' Cup Classic in 2009. In November 2009, Shirreffs became the first trainer to conquer both the Ladies' Classic and Classic in the same year, as Life Is Sweet romped home in the former and Zenyatta defeated males in the latter. Shirreffs grew up around horses at his family's farm. He served in the Marine Corps until he was discharged. Later he broke yearlings for Ed Nahem at Lakeview thoroughbred farm. After that Shirreffs got his training license in 1978 and operated a small stable in Northern California. He is married to Dottie Ingordo.
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    Jonathan E. Sheppard

    Jonathan E. Sheppard (born December 2, 1940 in Ashwell, Hertfordshire, England) is a Hall of Fame trainer in American Thoroughbred horse racing. Sheppard came to the United States in 1961 and in 1966 won his first race with Haffaday in a steeplechase event at My Lady's Manor, Maryland. In 1973 he won his first earnings championship in steeplechase racing. He went on to win the earnings title another twenty-three times. He has trained the winner of four Breeders' Cup Grand National Steeplechase and holds the record for most wins in the Colonial Cup Steeplechase with eleven. Sheppard is the only trainer to win the American steeplechase Triple Crown, doing it with Flatterer, the only horse to win the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Steeplechase horse four years in a row. In addition to steeplechase racing, Jonathan Sheppard has met with considerable success in flat racing. In both venues, he has had a long working relationship with stable owner, George W. Strawbridge, Jr. and in 2008 he conditioned Strawbridge's filly Forever Together to victory in the Breeders' Cup Filly & Mare Turf. In 1990, he was inducted in the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. In 2004, Jonathan Sheppard
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    Jonjo O'Neill

    Jonjo O’Neill (born 13 April 1952) is an Irish racehorse trainer and former National Hunt jockey. O'Neill was born in County Cork. His boyhood ambition was to become a jockey, and, after leaving school he began an apprenticeship with Michael Connolly. In 1970 he rode his first winner when Lana dead-heated at the Curragh. Three years later, O'Neill moved to England and from then on his career burgeoned. In 1977/78, he broke the record for most winners in a season. His tally of one hundred and forty nine beat the previous record (held by former champion and one of Jonjo’s closest friends, Ron Barry) by twenty four. In the 1979/1980 season, he claimed the Jockeys’ Championship for a second time. O'Neill was a hugely popular figure as a jockey. In a career spanning 16 years (between 1970 and 1986), he notched up 901 winners, and secured a reputation as one of the greatest jump jockeys of all time. Over the course of his career, O'Neill sustained many injuries, some of them serious and ensuring lengthy spells on the sidelines. His great rival and friend, John Francome, once described O'Neill’s achievements in winning two Champion Jockeys’ titles whilst based in the far north of England
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    Michael Stoute

    Sir Michael Ronald Stoute (born 22 October 1945 in Barbados) is a Barbadian British thoroughbred horse trainer in flat racing. Stoute, whose father was the Chief of police for Barbados, left the island in 1964 at the age of 19 to become an assistant to trainer Pat Rohan and began training horses on his own in 1972. His first win as a trainer came on 28 April 1972 when Sandal, a horse owned by Stoute’s father, won at Newmarket Racecourse in Suffolk, England. Since then, he has gone on to win races all over the globe, including victories in the Dubai World Cup, the Breeders Cup, the Japan Cup and the Hong Kong Vase. He was knighted in 1998 for services to tourism in Barbados. He was the only trainer in the 20th century to win an English Classic in five successive seasons and has been Champion Trainer ten times (1981, 1986, 1989, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006 and 2009). He was the trainer for Kribensis, who is the only horse to have won the Triple Crown of Hurdling, doing so in the 1989/90 racing season. Stoute also trained Shergar, arguably his most famous horse, who won the 1981 Epsom Derby and was later stolen, presumably by the IRA. In 2009, three horses trained by Stoute,
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    Roger Attfield

    Roger L. Attfield (November 28, 1939 in Newbury, Berkshire, England) is a Canadian thoroughbred horse trainer and owner and an inductee of both the Canadian and United States horseracing Halls of Fame. In his native England, Attfield had become an accomplished international-level equestrian competitor when he emigrated to Canada in 1970. Five years later he returned to the sport he loved and began working as a trainer of show jumping horses and eventually was offered the chance to train thoroughbred race horses. Instant success led to training opportunities for other owners including for Frank Stronach and Kinghaven Farms where he met with his greatest success. A resident of Nobleton, Ontario, Roger Attfield won the Sovereign Award for Outstanding Trainer a record six times. Of the seven horses who have won the Canadian Triple Crown, three were trained by Attfield. A winner of twenty Canadian Triple Crown races, he holds or equals the record for most wins in each of the three races. In 2001, he set a record for most wins by a trainer in the Breeders' Stakes and in 2005 set the record for trainers by winning his fifth Prince of Wales Stakes. At the 2008 Queen's Plate, Attfield tied
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    Wally Dunn

    Thomas Wallace "Wally" Dunn (December 4, 1911 - April 21, 2004) is a Canadian-born Thoroughbred horse trainer. Born in Minitonas, Manitoba, Wally Dunn went to Vancouver, British Columbia at age seventeen where he would find work in Thoroughbred horse racing. One of five brothers who became involved in the sport, his brother Wilson Dunn bred George Royal and brother George trained the 1965 Canadian Horse of the Year. In the 1930s, Wally Dunn took horses south to race at Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles, California. Dunn's career as a trainer was interrupted by World War II when he served overseas with the Canadian Army. After the war, Dunn returned to train in California. Among his notable Thoroughbreds was in Correspondent who won 1953's Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland Race Course and the following year the Hollywood Gold Cup Stakes at Hollywood Park Racetrack. Wally Dunn had four horses compete in the Kentucky Derby and two in the Preakness Stakes. Correspondent's 5th place finish was his most successful Derby and in 1962 Green Hornet gave a 6th place best in the Preakness. In 1964, he trained Colorado King who also won the Hollywood Gold Cup Stakes and equalled the world record
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    William Hurley

    William J. "Bill" Hurley was an American horse trainer in Thoroughbred horse racing. He is best remembered for his more than two decades as a trainer for Col. Edward R. Bradley's Idle Hour Stock Farm. Among Bill Hurley's early victories was a win with Kalitan in his first Preakness Stakes in 1917, a race he would win again twenty-three years later. He trained Bagenbaggage, who won the 1926 Latonia and Louisiana Derbys and was second in the Kentucky Derby to stablemate, Bubbling Over. That same year Hurley also won the 1926 American Derby with Boot to Boot, beating both Display and Black Maria. In 1935 Bill Hurley won the Florida Derby, Coaching Club American Oaks and American Derby with the great filly and 1991 U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee, Black Helen. Another of Hurley's important Hall of Fame horses was Bimelech who earned U.S. Champion 2-Yr-Old Colt and 3-Year-Old honors in 1939 and 1940 respectively, and who just missed winning the U.S. Triple Crown when he finished second in the 1940 Kentucky Derby then won both the Preakness and Belmont Stakes.
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